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Eric Offner, the founder & president of The Sidney Bechet Society, passed on, early Tuesday morning.

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Greetings jazz lovers, and longtime friends,

It is with sadness that we report that Eric Offner, the
founder & president of The Sidney Bechet Society,
passed on, early Tuesday morning.

Eric’s declining health had prevented him from attending
our last two concerts. He passed quietly in his sleep, in
the comfort of his own home, where he had hosted many
SBS events over the years.

A memorial service will be held on Long Island,
Sunday, June 8th, at 1:30pm, at the
Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Shelter Rock (http://www.uucsr.org/discover/getting-to-shelter-rock/)
48 Shelter Rock Rd, Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 627-6560

A further memorial, in Manhattan, will follow in the
coming months. We will keep you informed & updated.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be sent to:
Drug Fighters School
c/o Reach the Children
Attn: Mary Harris, Executive Director
14 Chesham Way, Fairport, NY 14450

All the best,
Donald, Phil, Geri and the SBS family

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Phil Stern
philstern5@aol.com (mailto:philstern5@aol.com)
516-209-1437
The Sidney Bechet Society
www.sidneybechet.org (http://www.sidneybechet.org/)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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LondonJazzCollector | Adventures in collecting “modern jazz”

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** LondonJazzCollector (http://londonjazzcollector.wordpress.com/)
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** Adventures in collecting “modern jazz”: the classical music of America from the Fifties and Sixties, on original vinyl, on a budget, from England. And writing about it
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Doyle New York to Auction the Jazz Collection of Bruce Lundvall on June 25, 2014 – 2805 – Doyle New York

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** Philip Harrison Hays American, 1931-2005 Bessie Smith – The World’s Greatest Blues Singer, 1970 (CBS 66258)
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Estimate: $1,000 – 1,500

Jim Marshall American, 1936-2010 Miles Davis at Newman’s Gym, 1971 Robert L. Weaver American, 1924-1994 Charlie Parker, Bird with Strings: Live at the Apollo, Carnegie Hall and Birdland Marshall Arisman American, b. 1937 Bud Powell Paul Davis American, b. 1938 Clifford Brown: The Beginning and the End 1952/56, reissued 1973 Philip Harrison Hays American, 1931-2005 Bessie Smith – The World’s Greatest Blues Singer, 1970 (CBS 66258) Robert Weaver American, 1924-1994 Charlie Parker, 1977 Thomas B. Allen American, 1928-2004 (i) Lester Young (ii) Eric Gale – I Know that’s Right Laszlo Kubinyi American, 20th Century Thelonious Monk, Straight No Chaser Thomas B. Allen American, 1928-2004 Lester Young – The Lester Young Story Volume 1, 1975 Bruce Mitchell American, 1908-1963 Jazz Orchestra from the Wings Robert Andrew Parker American, b. 1927 Art Tatum, Piano Starts Here, 1968 Ink and watercolor on paper 17 x 17 i… Al Hirschfeld American, 1903-2003 Bruce with Sax Robert Weaver
American, 1924-1994 Coleman Hawkins/Clark Terry – Back in Brown’s Bag, 1963 John Berg American, 20th Century Dexter Gordon – Homecoming: Live at the Village Vanguard, 1977 Thomas B. Allen American, 1928-2004 Lester Young

** DOYLE NEW YORK TO AUCTION THE JAZZ COLLECTION OF BRUCE LUNDVALL ON JUNE 25, 2014
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** Longtime President of Blue Note Records
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** The Bruce Lundvall Collection Will Be Offered as a Featured Section of the June 25 Doyle at Home Auction
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** The Collection Comprises Approximately Thirty Lots of Original Jazz Album Cover Art, Photographs and Ephemera
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Doyle New York is honored to auction a remarkable collection of original album cover art, rare photography and related ephemera assembled by Bruce Lundvall, longtime president of the renowned Jazz label, Blue Note Records. During his half-century in the music industry at record labels Columbia, CBS, Elektra, Manhattan (EMI) and finally Blue Note, Bruce Lundvall discovered and signed a number of Jazz legends.

The Bruce Lundvall Collection comprises approximately thirty lots documenting the history of Jazz. Featured items include the original artwork for Thelonious Monk’s groundbreaking album, Straight, No Chaser (Colombia: 1966) and Charlie Parker’s Bird with Strings: Live at the Apollo, Carnegie Hall and Birdland (CBS: 1977), as well as a rare 1972 photograph (printed in 1982) of Miles Davis that captures the mercurial genius in a boxing ring at a San Francisco gym. Additional highlights include original album artwork for a number of jazz legends, among them Art Tatum, Woody Shaw, Bessie Smith, Lester Young, Bud Powell and others.

The Bruce Lundvall Collection will be offered as a featured section of the Doyle at Home auction on June 25, 2014 at 10am. The public is invited to the exhibition on view from June 21 through 24 at Doyle New York.

The Internet catalgue for the Bruce Lundvall Collection will be available on Wednesday, June 11. Please check back.

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Buddy Bolden biopic to resume production, but without Anthony Mackie | NOLA.com

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** Buddy Bolden biopic to resume production, but without Anthony Mackie
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buddy bolden and band circa 1905.jpg

Hyatt Hotels scion Dan Pritzker is finally ready to resume production on his long-gestating biopic on New Orleans jazz pioneer Buddy Bolden. But he’s going to have to do it without leading man Anthony Mackie (http://topics.nola.com/tag/anthony%20mackie/index.html) , according to Deadline. (http://www.deadline.com/2014/05/seven-years-after-production-began-dan-pritzkers-bolden-skeds-new-shoot-sans-star-anthony-mackie/)

The planned three-month shoot for “Bolden!” — which Pritzker wrote and is directing — will be the third round of production on the film, which is described on IMDB as “a mythical account of … the first Cornet King of New Orleans.” It first went before cameras in 2007, and then underwent reshoots in 2009. This latest round will see Pritzker reshoot approximately half of his film.

Mackie, a New Orleans native who has seen his star rise significantly since production began — thanks to roles in such films as “The Hurt Locker (http://topics.nola.com/tag/hurt%20locker/index.html) ” and “Captain America: The Winter Soldier (http://topics.nola.com/tag/captain%20america/index.html) ” — participated in both of those shoots, which took place in New Orleans and in Wilmington, N.C. This time, however, he will be replaced Gary Carr (“Downton Abbey”).

Other cast members — at least in the previous shoots — include Jackie Earle Haley, Michael Rooker, Omari Hardwick and Mackie’s fellow New Orleanian Wendell Pierce. Locally reared jazzman Wynton Marsalis composed the film’s score.

The project, which Pritzker is self-financing, has cost a reported $30 million. So far. But as a billionaire member of Forbes’ list of the 400 richest Americans, he’s got pockets deep enough to keep shooting until he gets the film the way he likes it. “Obviously, I’ve had a steep learning curve, and I just decided that I wanted to tell the story in a different way than I had captured it,” he told Deadline’s Mike Fleming Jr. in a story published this week.

The three-month shoot for “Bolden!” is expected to take place largely in Wilmington.

The talented but troubled Bolden is among the more colorful characters in New Orleans’ exceedingly colorful jazz history. A cornet player, he was a huge draw in his hometown of New Orleans in the early 1900s, with “Funky Butt (Buddy Bolden’s Blues)” among his more celebrated numbers, one widely covered by other musicians.

Bolden’s career was hampered, however, by a struggle with mental illness — before it was halted all together by the onset of what is described as alcohol-related psychosis. By the time he was 30, he was institutionalized at the Louisiana State Insane Asylum at Jackson, where he lived for the remainder of his life. He died at 54 years old and was buried in a pauper’s cemetery in New Orleans.

His musical influence, however, long outlasted him. No known recordings of his work exist, and facts about his life have become intermingled with no small amount of mythology. This much is certain, though: Bolden’s improvisation-heavy blend of ragtime and blues — which he performed with his Bolden Band under the name King Bolden — is widely recognized as an originator of the musical form that would become jazz.

“Bolden!” isn’t the first time Pritzker has been motivated to make a film about a New Orleans jazz icon. He also wrote and directed a black-and-white silent film on the early years of Louis Armstrong, titled “Louis” and also featuring Mackie as Bolden. That film has played a handful of one-offs but has yet to land a distribution deal.

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The art of noise: how music recording has changed over the decades | Music | The Guardian

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** The art of noise: how music recording has changed over the decades
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giant exponential horn
Big audio dinosaur … the giant exponential horn at the Science Museum. Photograph: Jennie Hills

One of the great changes in the British countryside is that hedgerows and verges no longer glisten in the way they did 20 years ago. No longer does the sunlight catch the strands of tape that used to festoon thorns and grasses, lost reminders of another cassette jammed in the car stereo. It would eject, but would emerge trailing a loop of slender, slippery tape, the end snagged deep in the player’s insides. A helpful passenger might tease it free and painstakingly spool the tape back into its case, ready to play and jam again; more likely they would rip it from the machine and throw it out of the window.

Driving today has fewer distractions, hour after hour passing as the MP3 player shuffles through its enormous repertoire, and listening at home is equally trouble-free, a laptop and headphones doing away with the need for all those records, cassettes, CDs, turntables, amplifiers, wires and speakers. So much time filled, so much space saved; never before has music been so available and yet so immaterial. Perhaps it’s this immateriality that has provoked a revival of interest in older audio technologies, in ways of recording and listening that involve something more tangible than a stream of digital code. Tellingly, this is a revival led by people too young to have used these technologies when they were state of the art, probably even too young to have thrown that cassette tape (http://www.theguardian.com/music/cassette-tape) out of the car window. It’s this generation that is buying vinyl (http://www.theguardian.com/music/vinyl) , and it’s musicians of the same generation who
are making the records, experimenting with tape recorders and enthusing about analogue sound.

Some of this is fashion, of course, an audio equivalent of steampunk or hipster beard-growth, but there’s something more significant going on as well. The march of progress has taken us from innovation to innovation – mechanical to electrical, 78 to 33⅓, mono to stereo, LP to CD, Walkman to iPod – each new technology overwhelming us with its superiority and the way it solved recurrent problems in audio engineering – fidelity in recording, more signal and less noise in playback, longer listening times. Resistance was futile because the two halves of the recording industry marched hand in hand, phasing out production of older playback equipment as new formats were introduced.
audio cassette tapes Missing from the English countryside … old audio cassette tapes. Photograph: Alamy

Only now, when that march seems to have reached some sort of destination – all the music in the world available at any time, usually at little or no cost, in crystal-clear recordings – is it possible to question whether this is really where we want to be, or whether we might instead like to revisit some of the points along the way. It’s this retrospection that is allowing us to take pleasure in the special characteristics of old recording formats, to savour the realisation that technologies are not transparent, but put their particular stamp on the experience which they mediate. Etching, silk screen and lithography have all been superseded by more efficient printing methods, but visual artists continue to use them; perhaps music has reached this point too.

A process such as etching, cutting an image into a plate and then printing it affects what can be depicted and how we see it. In the same way, recording formats shape how musicians work and how we listen. Pop songs are short and sharp because in the days of analogue recording a song could last no longer than the time it took the gramophone needle to cross the narrow gap between the edge of the record and the maker’s label in the middle. Whether it was a 10-inch shellac disc turning at 78rpm, or a seven-inch single turning at 45rpm, the musical discipline was the same: there was time for variety – introduction, verse, chorus, middle eight, instrumental – but there had to be a beginning, middle and end too.

How the music was recorded was also important. For the first 50 years of the recording era the manufactured cylinder or disc was a duplicate of a live performance. As the musicians played, the disturbances they created in the air were caught by a horn, later a microphone, and etched into a groove. But with the advent of magnetic tape it became possible to combine layers of time, recording different performances side by side on the same length of tape. As tape technology developed in the 50s and 60s, the number of tracks multiplied, and musicians’ imaginations could wander through a labyrinth of takes, re-takes, overdubs and patches. With more and more tracks available nothing needed to be thrown away; recording became a sort of musical hoarding. Not sure about the bass line? Don’t delete it, just mute that track and add another version.

Multiple options can breed indecision, otherwise known as remixing. The history of pop music in the 1970s is full of tales of release dates postponed while artists agonised over how to create a definitive version out of all that accrued studio time, stacked up, track upon track, on the master tape. In the 1980s indecision became a marketing strategy – release one mix, then another, then another. In the age of the internet indecision was even promoted as a sort of shared creativity – don’t decide, just put everything you’ve got online and let the fans do the work.

But it is recording formats that matter most to listeners, and now that the LP is with us again it’s easy to see why we missed it. There’s room for enough of one sort of music – a Brahms symphony, Kind of Blue – but not too much. There’s a necessary break which, especially in pop music, imposes a set of helpful creative questions: is side two a variation of side one or should each new side offer a new style, a new energy? Above all, analogue formats remind us that in recording and listening we don’t have to be passive. In an age when we can wallpaper our lives with a random shuffle of MP3s, there’s something splendidly willed about choosing to put a record on a turntable. It’s a choice that necessitates more choices. CDs end in silence, but the scratch and click of the centre groove on an LP is a nagging call to action: get up, turn me over, or choose something else. There’s a hint of wilful destruction too, knowing that each playing spins the disc a little closer to its
ultimate ruin.

My involvement with the record industry began just as the last LPs were being cleared from the shelves, so I’ve only made CDs. But a year ago I began to make plans for an LP of music I have written for the cellist Anton Lukoszevieze (http://www.antonlukoszevieze.co.uk/) . As we only had enough music for one side of an LP I needed to write a new piece for the other side and I decided the music should, in some way, be about recording itself. The result is called re:play and begins with the cellist making a series of recordings of himself; as he listens back to what he has recorded and then tries to play the same music again, the recordings provide audible evidence that, try as he might, he can’t recapture what he initially played. To make this even clearer, each recording is made with a different technology, and in the version we made for BBC Radio 3 last month we used a Dictaphone, a Studer tape recorder and an Edison wax cylinder phonograph.

The first two were easy to find. The Studer was the work-horse of BBC radio studios until the digital age and the Dictaphone has been a lo-tech favourite of experimental musicians for many years; it’s battery-powered, fits in the palm of a hand, and distorts any sound it records. Edison’s machine, on the other hand, is a real antique and came with its own curator, Aleks Kolkowski, who carefully attached a large conical horn to the hand-cranked recorder and warmed up a wax cylinder with a hairdryer to soften the wax. The hairdryer may not have been authentic but everything else was, and when the recording was played back it sounded as if my music had been transported back in time to the early 1900s.

After the session I talked to Kolkowski, a violinist who works mostly in free improvisation, about the allure of the phonograph. “I saw my colleagues playing with laptops”, he told me, “and I wanted to do something else.” In particular he wanted to make music “influenced by post-1945 electronic music but using pre-electric technology”. He told me too about his most recent project, an installation called The Exponential Horn: In Search of Perfect Sound, which will open at the Science Museum on 20 May and has at its heart an “audio dinosaur”, a 27-foot horn loudspeaker.
Science Museum workshop staff Science Museum workshop staff working on the reconstruction of the giant horn. Photograph: Jennie Hills

The horn opens from an initial 4 sq cm to a 2.15 sq m mouth and is a reconstruction of one of the most popular exhibits in the Science Museum in the 1930s. The original was commissioned in 1929 by Roderick Denman, the Science Museum’s then curator of telecommunications, and was designed to reproduce the widest possible sound frequency range. Once a week this was demonstrated with broadcasts from the BBC’s London Regional Service and in Kolkowski’s installation the audio demonstrations will include sound art, new poetry and archive radio footage, with broadcasts from the BBC and Resonance FM (http://resonancefm.com/) as well as new work.

Audio nostalgia? Perhaps, but, like me, Kolkowski is interested in the way technology affects the processes of recording and listening. He is, he says, “very ambivalent about recording” and, because he wants to make “recordings that sound like recordings”, he chooses to work with technologies that very obviously impose themselves on what is recorded and how it is heard. For him the fascination of the Science Museum’s giant loudspeaker is not only its power and fidelity but also its limitations; there is, he says, an “incredible sound presence in front of the horn, almost three-dimensional” but as soon as one steps away “the sound changes dramatically”.

In 1972, in Ways of Seeing (http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2012/apr/02/how-we-made-ways-seeing) , John Berger described how, “for the first time ever, images of art have become ephemeral, ubiquitous, insubstantial, available, valueless, free”. Some time in the last decade innovations in recording and distribution reduced music to a similar condition, but it may be that installations such as The Exponential Horn and the boom in LP sales will restore some of that lost tangibility and substance, music to value rather than to throw away.

• Christopher Fox’s re:play will be broadcast on Radio 3 in the summer.

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Trumpeter’s ‘amazing’ trove of Long Island jazz memorabilia needs permanent home – Newsday

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** Trumpeter’s ‘amazing’ trove of Long Island jazz memorabilia needs permanent home
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Published: May 30, 2014 10:56 AM
By JAN TYLER Special to Newsday
Jazz trumpeter Tom Manuel of St. James has

Jazz trumpeter Tom Manuel of St. James has collected a vast trove of Long Island jazz memorabilia, including trumpets, trombones, sheet music and other items from the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s. Manuel, 35, seen in his basement of his home on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, wants to place the collection in a public domain so it can be seen and appreciated by the masses. (Credit: Newsday / Chuck Fadely)

Tom Manuel’s basement music room is reminiscent of Aladdin’s cave, if you substitute the diamonds, rubies, pearls and magic lamp for trumpets, trombones, sheet music and other jazz memorabilia from the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s.

All these items and more — autographed pictures, vintage LPs and diaries that once belonged to jazz musicians who played alongside greats like Duke Ellington, Count Basie…

Content Preview This content is exclusive for Newsday digital access and home delivery subscribers and Optimum Online customers.

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The Pianist Jon Weber Offers ‘From Joplin to Jarrett’ – NYTimes.com

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** The Pianist Jon Weber Offers ‘From Joplin to Jarrett’
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And Scott Joplin begat Jelly Roll Morton, who begat James P. Johnson, who begat Fats Waller, who begat Earl Hines, and on and on. That is a rough sketch of the jazz piano genealogy described by the pianist Jon Weber (http://www.jonwebermusic.com/) in his fascinating and essential show “From Joplin to Jarrett: 115 Years of Piano Jazz,” at the Metropolitan Room on Thursday evening.

That history suggested a river gathering tributaries until it reached a delta, symbolized by Keith Jarrett, whose unaccompanied solo marathon concerts in the 1970s summarized much of what preceded him.

From an academic perspective, this one-hour program was an enlightening music history tutorial, delivered with enthusiasm and wit by a musician with no axes to grind and who is utterly devoid of professorial grandiosity. But because Mr. Weber can play up a storm (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TO2Z5Nq9-tM&feature=kp) , it was also a thrilling demonstration of one man’s passionate attachment to his chosen instrument.

Mr. Weber, who has hosted the NPR series “Piano Jazz” (http://www.npr.org/series/145131718/piano-jazz-rising-stars) and is one of the most imaginative and gifted cabaret musical directors, has a deep understanding of how technology and the media have revolutionized the relationship between the musician and the audience. Yet he knows exactly how technical to get without sounding like a textbook.

Like many jazz musicians, Mr. Weber, despite a formidable talent that allows him to play in any style and key, is humble when contemplating the leaps made by his artistic forebears. When he reached Art Tatum and played his “walking chords” over a jet-propelled right hand, he said in awed tones that he had only 1 percent of Tatum’s ability. But that percentage seemed much higher in his phenomenal demonstration.

He showed how the sounds of instrumentalists — particularly on brass, clarinet and guitar — influenced piano styles. In broad outline, it was also the story of how African influences surpassed European styles, and how jazz improvisation, with Louis Armstrong leading the way by playing music that “came directly to his head,” overtook written composition. By embracing jazz, he said, America stopped being what he called “Europe Jr.”

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Jelly Roll Morton, ‘inventor’ of jazz music, is buried in Los Angeles | Off-Ramp | 89.3 KPCC

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** Jelly Roll Morton, ‘inventor’ of jazz music, is buried in Los Angeles
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** Public domain
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Jelly Roll Morton (third from left) and bandmates outside the Cadillac Cafe in 1918.

Of all the places in the United States to look for the headstone of the jazz’s first big innovator, East L.A. is probably the last place on the list. But buried under an unassuming stone in Cavalry Cemetery are the bones of Ferdinand Joseph LaMothe — better known as Jelly Roll Morton — the self-proclaimed, and not entirely wrong, “originator of jazz.”

Can any one person be credited with inventing jazz? Probably not, but Jelly Roll Morton had the audacity and experience to at least be a top contender for the position.

Morton was born in New Orleans in 1890 and honed his chops as a teenager, playing piano for deep-pocketed lowlifes in Storyvilile, New Orleans’ famed red light district and the birthplace of jazz.

There he developed an unmistakable sound, blending the ragtime feel of the previous century with his own complicated rhythms and innovative arrangements. He was a larger-than-life personality with a giant diamond in his teeth and furs on his shoulders.

When Storyville was shut down in 1918, he sought out his childhood crush, a woman named Anita Gonzales, who was running a tavern in Las Vegas. He wasn’t too keen on the weather there and suggested a move further west.

“Anyway, Anita decided to stay in Los Angeles so she went into a small hotel business,” said Morton in a 1938 interview with musicologist Alan Lomax. “She bought a hotel on the corner of Central near 12th in Los Angeles and named it The Anita. By that time, I had several little businesses branching out myself again.”

Most of Morton’s “business” skills had been picked up in Storyville: pool shark and pimp proved to be the most profitable. After an unsatisfactory musical career in Los Angeles, Morton packed his bags and left Anita behind.

He found success in Chicago scoring the more riotous Jazz Age parties with his Red Hot Peppers but when the Great Depression hit, Morton’s career stalled. He sold most of his diamonds and moved to New York.

In 1938, Morton was stabbed twice at a gig — in the head and in the chest. He survived, but the injuries led to chronic respiratory problems.

Two years later, at the age of 50, with failing health and a limited cash flow, he drove himself from New York to Los Angeles to reunite with Anita after almost 20 years.

Once in L.A., he ignored doctor’s orders and tried to mount a comeback, going so far as to book rehearsal time at Central Avenue’s Elks Hall with his old New Orleans friends Kid Ory and “Papa Mutt” Carey, but it never happened. On July 10, 1941, after an 11 day stay in Los Angeles’ General Hospital, he died of heart failure.

Jelly Roll Morton was buried without a headstone. Nine years later, the Southern California Hot Jazz Society held a fundraiser to finally put a marker over the jazzman’s casket. Only then did Anita step up to fund the stone herself, likely with the royalties he’d bequeathed to her on his deathbed.

In just a few short decades, Morton was lost to the evolving trends of jazz and had sabotaged his musical legacy with his own ego.

On the night he died, a savvier young bandleader named Duke Ellington premiered “Jump For Joy,” his impassioned bid for equality and artistic nobility at the Mayan Theater in downtown Los Angeles. The history books were far kinder to him.

Sean J. O’Connell’s book, Los Angeles’s Central Avenue Jazz (http://www.amazon.com/Angeless-Central-Avenue-Images-America/dp/146713130X) is out now onArcadia Publishing (http://www.arcadiapublishing.com/9781467131308/Los-Angeless-Central-Avenue-Jazz) . In it, you’ll find more on Jelly Roll and other Los Angeles Jazz musicians.

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Music: Louis Armstrong’s Renaissance on Record – WSJ.com

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** His Renaissance on Record
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Louis Armstrong (1901-1971) performed in public for most of his life: singing for coins as a child in the roughest streets of pre-World War I New Orleans, playing trumpet and vocalizing in legendary Chicago and New York jazz bands of the 1920s and ’30s, and entertaining huge throngs from the U.S. to Europe to Africa to Asia in the ’50s and ’60s. Performing for audiences (along with making records and movies) made “Satchmo” Armstrong one of the most famous and beloved persons on the planet.

And it was in-person performing that rescued Armstrong’s music from the artistic doldrums into which it had drifted after World War II.

A new nine-disc boxed set documents Louis Armstrong’s resurgence with his ‘All Stars’ band. © Bettmann/CORBIS

In the late 1940s, fronting a big-band out of step with the times and recording best-selling but saccharine-sounding vocal platters, Armstrong was being scorned by jazz critics and despaired over by devotees of the earlier hot music he’d helped invent. The renaissance in his sound and reputation came in 1947, when the charismatic performer pared down his ensemble to a combo of “All Stars” for a series of concert-hall appearances that played to his strengths as a virtuoso trumpeter, an inspiring leader, and a witty and emotional singer.

That period of reinvention is vividly presented on “The Columbia and RCA Victor Live Recordings of Louis Armstrong and the All Stars,” an ear-opening, nine-CD Mosaic boxed set to be released next week. Annotated by Armstrong biographer and archivist Ricky Riccardi, the package documents performances from 1947 to 1958 in venues from New York to Amsterdam to Accra.

The first instance here of the All Stars template Armstrong would follow the rest of his career is a late-night recital at New York’s Town Hall in the spring of 1947. Armstrong commands immediate attention with the up-tempo “Cornet Chop Suey,” a rhythmically intricate number he wrote in 1924—and plays here with a lively urgency that makes it seem as fresh as a Dizzy Gillespie bebop line. The brooding, soaring “Dear Old Southland” (copyright 1921), based on the spiritual “Deep River,” is done by Armstrong in duet with pianist Dick Cary and sounds even more soulful for its secular setting. “Our Monday Date,” “Pennies From Heaven,” “Ain’t Misbehavin'”—the hits from decades past keep coming, infused by Armstrong and colleagues with matchless fire and poignancy.

“This is American music, concert-style,” emcee Fred Robbins states during the next recorded All Stars gig, six months later at Carnegie Hall. Among Armstrong’s steady colleagues now are trombonist-singer Jack Teagarden, clarinetist Barney Bigard and vocalist Velma Middleton. All the stars through the years would be given featured numbers—including bassists and drummers. Teagarden is outstanding in 1947 on “St. James Infirmary”; Bigard makes an engaging showcase out of “Tea for Two.” But even in these spotlight numbers, Armstrong is a vital presence: playing a late-chorus counterpoint to Bigard, for instance, upping the energy toward a big-finish finale.

And when not playing, Armstrong is also a driving force: shouting encouragement to sidemen (some of it quite profane, in previously unreleased tracks) and uttering other heartfelt expressions of joie de vivre. He also directs the spectators from time to time: telling an enthusiastic Milano paisan, “Don’t sing louder than me, brother!” and addressing a terse (but funny) “Shut up, boy” to a boisterous Town Hall patron.

Audience response to Armstrong’s All Stars is at its most tumultuous in New York’s Lewisohn Stadium in the summer of 1956: While Edward R. Murrow’s CBS camera crew works through technical glitches between takes of the combo’s scheduled concert-arrangement performance of “St. Louis Blues” with an 88-piece symphony orchestra led by Leonard Bernstein, a large portion of the 21,000 spectators begin shouting “We want Louis,” prompting Armstrong and his band to wow them with an unplanned “Basin Street Blues.”

Forty-six of the 97 tracks in this Mosaic box are marked “previously unissued.” Some earlier-released cuts, sonically amplified 50 or 60 years ago, have had their dubbed-in applause removed. Certain performances once presented as concert takes are now revealed to have been done in a studio. Other selections made to seem then as if played before a large crowd were in fact swung in front of a smaller audience. Mr. Riccardi’s instructive notes tell us what inventive steps were taken back in the day by producer George Avakian not only to enhance the listener’s experience but to evade obstructive legal roadblocks set up by rival record companies and other factions.

Whether played in an outdoor stadium or an indoor studio, there’s a copious amount on these Mosaic discs of truth, beauty, spontaneous joy and technical prowess—be it the fierce ensemble swing generated on “Royal Garden Blues,” the sweetness of “Faithful Hussar” (a European folk tune in which Armstrong seems to scat sing in German) or the at-home party feel of trombonist Trummy Young on “You Can Depend on Me.” Armstrong’s upper-register notes—a stunning array of high C’s, D’s, E-flats and even an F—are especially heart-piercing on the slow-drag “Back o’ Town Blues,” while his loose and winning way with a lyric is demonstrated through three separate versions (at three different tempos) of “On the Sunny Side of the Street.” And not until Jimi Hendrix deconstructed the national anthem at Woodstock a decade later would there be anything to rival the ripping, impassioned, bravura “Star Spangled Banner” with which Armstrong caps the All Stars’ set at the Newport Jazz Festival of
1958.

As Teagarden drawls in appreciation on his first 1947 concert date with the All Stars: “I’m really in heaven tonight.” Or as Louis shouts at the end of a raucous 1958 Newport number: “Shake ’em on down!”

Mr. Nolan is the author of “Artie Shaw, King of the Clarinet: His Life and Times” (Norton).

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Jazz and Cocktails From the Crypt – WSJ.com

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** Jazz and Cocktails From the Crypt
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An evening of music and drinks in the crypt of the Church of the Intercession.Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

On the steps of the Church of the Intercession on 155th Street and Broadway, Allison Meier, the senior editor for Atlas Obscura, an online compendium of “the world’s wondrous and curious places,” was directing small groups of partygoers wearing vintage formalwear into the church, through the cemetery outside, and down into an underground crypt.

“This is the only currently operating cemetery in Manhattan, but they just do immediate burials, meaning that you can’t buy a plot—you can only get a spot if you need to be buried right then!” explained Ms. Meier, Atlas Obscura’s resident cemetery aficionado, trying in vain to conceal her enthusiasm.

Ella Morton Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

Guests collected inside the crypt on Saturday night, marveling at the majestic architecture and sipping Prohibition-era cocktails as candlelight danced across the walls and a jazz pianist began warming up the crowd. The guests had come for Cocktails in the Crypt, a night of jazz and vintage-inspired libations, put on by the New York Obscura Society, the real-world exploration arm of Atlas Obscura.

“I forwarded the information about this party to my roommate and said, ‘I’m dying to go!’ She asked me if the pun was intended. It wasn’t, but I wished it was,” said Anne Johnson, the social media manager for Vogue.com, looking around the crypt.

Ms. Johnson then smiled knowingly while reflecting on the fact that the cemetery only accommodates on-demand burials: “Wouldn’t you feel bad if your relative asked to be buried in this cemetery and you couldn’t get them in? Like, wouldn’t that be so New York? To not be able to get in?”

Dylan Thuras, who founded Atlas Obscura with Joshua Foer in 2009, explained, “This is kind of the natural completion of the mission we started with—we felt like the world was filled with wonders and hidden spots and hidden stories, both far-flung and close to home, so the events we do complete our mission by helping actually bring people to these places.”

Megan Roberts, Atlas Obscura’s events director, echoed this sentiment: “If you’re not looking for new experiences, even within your own city, you’re missing out. To us, not only was this an incredible space, but, like…Come uptown for the evening! We were trying to break the mold with this—it’s the first event we’ve done in Harlem.”

At around 11 p.m., Loren Schoenberg, the artistic director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, descended the staircase into the crypt. As he gazed around in awe, he seemed at a loss for words because of the beauty of the setting.

“How the heck…? Who would think that under a church…?” he said.

A few minutes later, he introduced Lucky Chops, an eight-year-old jazz band whose members were students together at La Guardia High School. The band’s set included originals and covers of songs including “Eye of the Tiger,” “This Little Light of Mine” and “I Feel Good.”

Because of the acoustics in the crypt, the band filled the room with roaring, honking, swinging explosions. Talking was no use. Luckily, guests didn’t appear to have come for the conversation—most took the opportunity to show off their finest steps.

Leo Pellegrino of the Lucky Chops Brass Band Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

Joseph Desmond, the Accounting Policy Director at Citigroup, and his wife Nicole, a Pilates instructor, dressed to the nines (he in black-and-white wingtips, she with a feather in her hair) and dancing with vigor, appeared to have stepped out of “The Great Gatsby.”

Katherine Rushton with Eric Dysart Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

“When we got married 20 years ago, we took some lessons, and when you’re with someone for that long, you start to know their moves. It’s important not to step on each other,” said Mr. Desmond.

A few feet away, David Bailey and Stephanie Harrison-Bailey, who were married the day before, reflected on Ms. Harrison-Bailey’s dress: “It was the first dress I saw on the rack in a thrift store—I got it right before the party,” she said.

Mr. Bailey looked closely at the dress.

“I suspect the dress is haunted and being near this crypt will trigger some cataclysmic event,” he joked.

By midnight, the air inside the crypt had become humid and taken on the smell of live bodies. Josh Holcomb, the 22-year-old bandleader, wearing wingtips and a vibrant suit, stood outside in the cemetery, taking in some fresh air during the band’s break.

“This is definitely the spookiest place we’ve ever performed—we’ve never played in a cemetery, much less an indoor cemetery,” he said, glancing around at the tombstones.

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A New Focus on Eric Dolphy, in Washington and Montclair – NYTimes.com

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** A New Focus on Eric Dolphy, in Washington and Montclair
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Continue reading the main story Slide Show

** A Virtuoso Revisited
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Credit Francis Wolff/Mosaic Images, via CORBIS.

In the jazz of the 1960s, Eric Dolphy was an original: a hero to some, but also a mystery, a virtuosic improviser searching for ways of expression outside of common practice. He died of an undiagnosed diabetic condition in Berlin in June 1964, at 36, old enough to consolidate his experience and wisdom but perhaps too young to settle his reputation, which had by then taken some knocks from those who found his music abstract or abrasive.

Though he had recorded a fair amount, especially in his last four years, culminating in the 1964 album “Out to Lunch!” and a Dutch performance recorded 27 days before his death and released as “Last Date,” there is still more to be known about what produced and drove him. Right now, a half-century after his death, might be a significant turning point. His musical papers have just been acquired by the Music Division of the Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/rr/perform/div-intro.html) , and his music, including pieces never performed before, will be played at a two-day festival in his honor, called Eric Dolphy: Freedom of Sound (http://seedartists.org/) , this weekend in Montclair, N.J.

The papers were long in the possession of Dolphy’s close friends the composer Hale Smith, who died in 2009 (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/28/arts/music/28smith.html) , and his wife, Juanita, who later gave them to the flutist and composer James Newton (http://www.jamesnewtonmusic.com/) . The cache, five boxes of material, is available to scholars in the Library of Congress Performing Arts Reading Room. It includes several previously unperformed works, as well as extensions or alternative arrangements of Dolphy pieces, including “Hat and Beard,” “Gazzelloni” and “The Prophet.”

It also holds a key to how he thought and what he practiced: his transcriptions of other music, including bits of Charlie Parker and Stravinsky; Bach’s Partita in A minor for flute; and a bass-clarinet arrangement for Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1. There are also many scales of Dolphy’s own devising, which he was using as the basis for improvisation; practice books and lead sheets; and a page of transcriptions of bird calls.

“The thing that really astounded me,” Mr. Newton said recently, “was that this was a person who thought very profoundly about the organization of his music.” Dolphy wrote out hundreds of his altered or “synthetic” scales. In some cases, including on the individual parts for “Out to Lunch!,” he wrote out the unusual scales beneath the composition, as a possible basis for improvisation.

“Eric was developing multiple styles of music simultaneously,” Mr. Newton continued. “There was this highly chromatic post-bop; then music that combined elements of jazz and contemporary classical; and jazz combined with world music.” (Dolphy, along with his friend John Coltrane, was listening to Hindustani music and the songs of the so-called Pygmy peoples of Central Africa.)

The festival, organized by the drummer Pheeroan akLaff and produced by his nonprofit organization, Seed Artists, will be held this Friday and Saturday at Montclair State University. It will include some of those previously unperformed works, which Mr. Newton is reasonably sure come from the end of Dolphy’s life. It will also include other Dolphy-related music performed by several generations of musicians, including Andrew Cyrille, Henry Threadgill, Don Byron, Vernon Reid, Oliver Lake, Marty Ehrlich, David Virelles, James Brandon Lewis and Dolphy’s former bandmate the 84-year old bassist Richard Davis.
Continue reading the main story

Dolphy, born in 1928, played alto saxophone, bass clarinet and flute. He grew up in Los Angeles and didn’t move to New York until the age of 30 — not the standard narrative of most great figures in jazz during that time. He was an only child, and a prodigy: While still in junior high, he won a two-year scholarship to study at the music school of the University of Southern California, and his parents built him a music studio behind the house.

Dolphy came into a compositional style that used wide interval jumps in various ways, sensuous or fractured. He also organized an original improvising language, both in and out of traditional Western harmony and jazz convention. He was influenced by, among others, Parker, Art Tatum and Arnold Schoenberg, as well as the microtones and quick-pivoting phrasing of bird song.

“In my own playing,” he told the critic Martin Williams in 1960, “I am trying to incorporate what I hear. I hear other resolutions on the basic harmonic patterns, and I try to use them. And I try to get the instrument to more or less speak — everybody does.”

Toward the end of his life, Dolphy wasn’t getting enough work playing his own music. He’d been derided in the jazz press, especially after touring with Coltrane in 1961 and 1962. “He was getting criticized even by friends,” Ms. Smith said.

He left New York for Europe in early 1964, to tour with Charles Mingus. (He eventually quit that tour, determined to work on his own in Europe and to settle down with his fiancée, the dancer Joyce Mordecai, who was living in Paris.) Before leaving, he dropped off his papers and other things, including tapes and a reel-to-reel recorder, with the Smiths. The tapes yielded “Other Aspects,” an album released in 1987. But the sheet music, finally given to Mr. Newton in 2004, took a while longer to be sorted out.

Among the never previously performed pieces scheduled for the weekend are an untitled solo bass-clarinet work, to be played by Mr. Byron; a short piece for flute and bass, “To Tonio, Dead”; and “Song F.T.R.H.” and “On the Rocks,” for jazz ensembles.

Those last two were written without tempo markings, but Mr. Newton and Mr. akLaff agree that they are to be played slowly. Mr. akLaff said the pieces could be described as ceremonial music, having a “deep, dark grandeur.” (Dolphy seemed to like word puzzles; we don’t know what F.T.R.H. stands for, nor the meaning of words written in pencil on one version of the score: “Split clock birds drink wood’s angel through longhouse.”)

If Dolphy didn’t have enough cultural capital at his death to inspire a school of imitators, he became a model for how to be dedicated and curious. Mr. Lewis, 30, a saxophonist who will perform in an ensemble on Saturday, said that Dolphy suggests “a figure determined to say what he had to say at the highest level in which he had to say it.” (Like everyone who talks about Dolphy, at a certain point Mr. Lewis just had to indicate an example and listen, agog: He specified Dolphy’s bass-clarinet solo on Billy Strayhorn’s “Take the A Train,” live with Mingus in 1964, which can be easily found on YouTube. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuCbQCnoIzI) )

“He’s just amazing,” Mr. Lewis added. “He sounds completely different than anyone else on stage, but he sounds confident.”

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My Terrifyingly Gracious Meeting With Miles Davis – Speakeasy – WSJ

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** My Terrifyingly Gracious Meeting With Miles Davis
————————————————————

Everett Collection
Miles Davis in the 1980s.

Miles Davis, who would’ve turned 85 today, was, without dispute, a giant of late 20^th century music, fronting two of America’s great quintets and developing several streams of modern jazz. He was also my first major assignment for The Wall Street Journal.

This was back in the early ‘80s when the paper was introducing its Leisure & Arts section. I had written a review of a book about Davis and was encouraged by my then-editor Raymond Sokolov to seek other assignments. At the time, Columbia was investing in introducing Wynton Marsalis to the jazz world and I offered to do a story about him. Then, I had the idea, which fell somewhere between inspiration and idiocy, to ask Davis about Marsalis. They were about to share a double bill at Lincoln Center and Marsalis, who was in his early 20s, would be playing with some members of the second great Davis quintet.

You have to understand that there was no reasonable expectation that Davis would agree. He didn’t seem to like critics and if he wanted to open up, the greats like Whitney Balliett, Leonard Feather and Nat Hentoff could offer him a platform. But I had underestimated the pull of the Journal and, more to it, Davis’s desire to discuss his electric fusion music – in case anyone expected he would return to the past to play ‘50s style jazz with Marsalis and his old friends. Word arrived that Davis would meet me in a restaurant near the United Nations.

Overly prepared and properly terrified – I was well aware Davis could be contentious – I turned up at least a half hour early for the interview, and then said nothing as Davis, fresh from swimming for exercise, walked past me. I didn’t know what to do – what’s the protocol when you’re dealing with a legend? Finally, a publicist arrived to introduce me. I was quaking when Davis and I shook hands.

I was relieved to find him in a playful mood. He asked the publicist if she liked his new publicity photo. When she allowed she did, he asked her if she put it up in her bedroom. When she said her husband might disapprove, in his raspy voice, Davis replied, “Give him one too.”

He ordered coffee with a dollop of vanilla ice cream and the interview began. I asked, with little grace I’m sure, what he thought of Marsalis’s music. “Somebody must like it,” he replied. “But I don’t.” To my surprise, he began to talk about how he enjoyed playing acoustic hard bop in its day – and then launched into a long story about Fats Navarro, a trumpeter who I knew only a little about. When I asked about what we might expect from the Davis band at the Lincoln Center, he put his Walkman on the table, slipped the cushiony headphones over my ears and let me hear an excerpt from his latest rehearsal. With warm eyes, he watched as I listened. Coming to jazz from rock, I focused on the rhythm section featuring Al Foster on drums. Removing the headphones, I mentioned how I could feel how tight Foster and bassist Marcus Miller locked in. “You got to have a black drummer,” Davis commented. I had no idea what he meant, but, to hide my ignorance, failed to ask him to
explain.

Soon the publicist returned and the interview ended. From the moment we met until I left, Davis was gracious, funny and most of all forgiving – he knew I was a kid and in way over my head. After following up with phone calls to Marsalis and Davis, I wrote the story and it ran. Everyone seemed pleased. I never spoke to Davis again.

The coda: I taped the conversation with Davis and was particularly proud of the moment when he asked me if I knew music. “Yes,” I replied, though what I knew at the time was what I’d learned playing folk guitar and triads on piano. “Good,” Davis replied, before moving on to explain how his compositions evolved in rehearsal. I played that section for many friends.

A few years later, when my family and I were moving, I put about 100 cassette tapes, including several interviews I’d done for the Journal, in a plastic garbage bag and put in among the boxes to be loaded on the moving van. Months later, I discovered the movers had tossed it. Though some of the particulars of what Davis said have faded from memory in the subsequent decades, I’ve always remembered how sympathetic he was to me. Over the years, I’ve learned by talking to many members of his various bands that I had met the Miles Davis they knew – and had a glimpse of the man whose sensitivity and spirit was conveyed in his most memorable music. It was an experience I’ll never forgot.

Mr. Fusilli is the Journal’s rock and pop music critic. Email him atjfusilli@wsj.com (mailto:jfusilli@wsj.com) or follow him on Twitter: @wsjrock (http://twitter.com/#%21/wsjrock) .

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Herb Jeffries, a.k.a. ‘Bronze Buckaroo’ of Song and Screen, Dies at 100 (or So) – NYTimes.com

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/27/arts/music/herb-jeffries-singing-star-of-black-cowboy-films-dies-at-100.html?emc=edit_tnt_20140526&nlid=16833052&tntemail0=y&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/27/arts/music/herb-jeffries-singing-star-of-black-cowboy-films-dies-at-100.html?emc=edit_tnt_20140526&nlid=16833052&tntemail0=y&_r=0)

** Herb Jeffries, a.k.a. ‘Bronze Buckaroo’ of Song and Screen, Dies at 100 (or So)
————————————————————

Photo
A 1930s poster for “The Bronze Buckaroo.” Credit John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive, via Getty Images

Herb Jeffries, who sang with Duke Ellington (http://movies.nytimes.com/person/88854/Duke-Ellington?inline=nyt-per) and starred in early black westerns as a singing cowboy known as “the Bronze Buckaroo” — a nickname that evoked his malleable racial identity — died on Sunday in West Hills, Calif. He was believed to be 100.

The cause was heart failure, said Raymond Strait, a writer who had worked on Mr. Jeffries’s autobiography with him.

Mr. Jeffries used to say: “I’m a chameleon.” The label applied on many levels.

Over the course of his century, he changed his name, altered his age, married five women and stretched his vocal range from near falsetto to something closer to a Bing Crosby baritone. He shifted from jazz to country and back again, and from concert stages to movie theaters to television sets and back again.

He sang with Earl Hines and his orchestra in the early 1930s. He starred in“Harlem on the Prairie,” (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0028978/) a black western released in 1937, and its several sequels. By 1940, he was singing with the Ellington orchestra and soon had a hit single,“Flamingo,” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORaSnWF2SX4&list=RDORaSnWF2SX4#t=7) 1941, which sold more than 14 million copies. (His name had been Herbert Jeffrey, but the credits on the record mistakenly called him Jeffries, so he renamed himself to match the typo.)
Photo
Herb Jeffries in a 2006 interview. Credit Stephanie Diani for The New York Times

He moved to Europe and performed there for many years, including at nightclubs he owned. He was back in America by the 1950s, recording jazz records again, including “Say It Isn’t So,” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-IycrV_CBE) a highly regarded 1957 collection of ballads. In the 1970s he picked up roles on “Hawaii Five-O” and “I Dream of Jeannie.” In the 1990s he performed at the Village Vanguard. In the 2000s he performed regularly at Cafe Aroma in Idyllwild, Calif.

Deep into his 90s, he was still swinging.

“He called me over once and said, ‘Is this your place, kid?’ ” recalled Frank Ferro, who runs the cafe. “He said, ‘I’ve had two nightclubs in Paris, and let me tell you, kid, you’re doing it all just right.’ ”

Mr. Ferro also recalled Mr. Jeffries saying: “You know, I’m colored. I’m just not the color you think I am.”

Mr. Jeffries’s racial and ethnic identity was itself something of a performance — and a moving target. His mother was white, his father more of a mystery. He told some people that his father was African-American, others that he was mixed race and still others that he was Ethiopian or Sicilian.

In the crude social math of his era, many people told Mr. Jeffries he could have “passed” for white. He told people he chose to be black — to the extent that a mixed-race person had a choice at the time.

“He told me he had to make this decision about whether he should try to pass as white,” the jazz critic Gary Giddins recalled in an interview for this obituary. “He said: ‘I just knew that my life would be more interesting as a black guy. If I’d chosen to live my life passing as white, I’d have never been able to sing with Duke Ellington.’ ”

In 1951, Life magazine published an extensive feature on Mr. Jeffries that dwelled heavily on his racial heritage.

“Jeffries’s refusal to ‘pass’ and his somewhat ambiguous facial appearance have let him in for so many cases of prejudice and mistaken identity that he is practically a one-man minority group,” the article said. It described his “smoky blue eyes” and noted that he was frequently mistaken for Mexican, Argentine, Portuguese “and occasionally a Jew,” but that he had chosen to be “what he is — a light-skinned Negro.”
Continue reading the main story

Mr. Jeffries cited his race as Caucasian on marriage licenses. (All five of his wives were white; his second wife was the stripper Tempest Storm.)

Late in life he said that his father, Howard Jeffrey, was actually his stepfather, and that his biological father was Domenico Balentino, a Sicilian who died in World War I.

In a 2007 documentary about him, “A Colored Life,” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkMSZJKmrek) Mr. Jeffries said that the name on his birth certificate was Umberto Alejandro Balentino, and that he was born on Sept. 24, 1913, two years later than he had sometimes told people. The documentary included a mock birth certificate bearing that name.

Firm evidence of Mr. Jeffries’s race and age is hard to come by, but census documents from 1920 described him as “mulatto” and listed his father as a black man named Howard Jeffrey. They give his birth year as 1914, which matches what he told Life in 1951.

“It’s always been the big question, you know — where do we really come from?” Romi West, one of Mr. Jeffries’s daughters from his first marriage, said in an interview.

Herbert Jeffrey was born in Detroit on Sept. 24, in either 1913 or 1914. In addition to his wife, Savannah, and his daughter, Mrs. West, his survivors include two sons, Robert and Michael; two daughters, Ferne Aycock and Patricia Jeffries; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Mr. Giddins, the jazz critic, noted that people tend to think of Mr. Jeffries primarily as a black cowboy star or as a man with a complicated racial story. But what was most remarkable about Mr. Jeffries, he said, was his voice.

“ ‘Flamingo’ was a really important recording,” Mr. Giddins said. “Partly because of that, RCA gave Ellington carte blanche in the 1940s. I don’t think he would have had that kind of complete authority in the studio if ‘Flamingo’ wasn’t making so much money for them.”

Mr. Giddins said Mr. Jeffries never seemed consumed with being successful. He noted that even as he became a star while singing with Ellington, Mr. Jeffries chose to leave to pursue other endeavors.

“He has these gorgeous tones, and he really knows how to phrase a ballad,” Mr. Giddins said. “The mystery is why that didn’t lead to a bigger career.”

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Jeff Goldblum Plays A Jazz Show Almost Every Week. No, Really. : NPR

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** Jeff Goldblum Plays A Jazz Show Almost Every Week. No, Really.
————————————————————

by TOM DREISBACH
May 25, 2014 4:21 PM ET

**
————————————————————

All Things Considered (http://www.npr.org/programs/all-things-considered/)
5 min 55 sec
*
* Download (http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/atc/2014/05/20140525_atc_jeff_goldblum_plays_a_jazz_show_almost_every_week_no_really.mp3?dl=1)
* Transcript (http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=312857631)

Jeff Goldblum performs with his band The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra on Wednesdays at Rockwell club in L.A.

Jeff Goldblum performs with his band The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra on Wednesdays at Rockwell club in L.A.
Hayley Bartels for NPR

Did you know the theme music (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOmJLk1lu08&t=1m25s) to Jurassic Park has lyrics?

Well, according to Jeff Goldblum, who played “Dr. Ian Malcolm” in the film, here they are:

In Jurassic Park
Scary in the dark
I’m so scared that I’ll be eaten.

At least that’s what Goldblum said — or, rather, sang — at a recent performance of the jazz show he plays in Los Angeles almost every week. He’s been playing there since the 1990s.

Goldblum’s long-time hobby might come as a surprise to his fans.

The actor, now 61 years old, has been performing in movies, television, and on stage for more than four decades. In addition to Jurassic Park, he’s acted in Independence Day, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Big Chill, The Fly and dozens of other films and TV shows, where he provides that uniquely wry, charming, and unpredictable edge.

But before Jeff Goldblum was an actor, he played piano.

“I’m from Pittsburgh, and I played piano when I was a kid,” Goldblum says before a recent performance. “I got the idea to play out and about in cocktail lounges when I was, like, 15, and got a job or two.”
Goldblum’s acting career still comes first, but when he’s not busy acting, he gets his band together for an improvised set.

Goldblum’s acting career still comes first, but when he’s not busy acting, he gets his band together for an improvised set.
Hayley Bartels for NPR

Ever since, whenever he’s not playing a character on set, he’s playing a piano at home.

“These days and for many years, I just hardly spend a day where I don’t pass a piano in my place and just play for as long as I can,” he says.

Meet The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

Sometime in the 1990s — and he can’t recall exactly when — Goldblum got a band together through a friend of a friend named John Mastro, who had connections in the local music scene.

“We just started playing,” says Mastro, who still manages the band. There was “no advertising or anything. It was just something to do.”

The semi-regular group of professional jazz players that perform with Goldblum even took on a name, The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra. They’re named for a friend of Goldblum’s family back in Pittsburgh.

Goldblum says he still prioritizes his acting career, so the shows have not always been exactly weekly. But when he’s not busy, he’ll get his band together for the very loose, improvised three-hour show at an L.A. club called Rockwell.

“So we have a kind of hootenanny, or be-in, or some kind of a jam session is what they call it,” Goldblum says, “and people seem to enjoy it.”

Working The Room
Fans take their picture with Goldblum before the show at Rockwell club in Los Angeles. Goldblum likes to mingle with audience members before the show. “Nobody works the room like Jeff Goldblum,” says John Mastro, the band’s manager.

Fans take their picture with Goldblum before the show at Rockwell club in Los Angeles. Goldblum likes to mingle with audience members before the show. “Nobody works the room like Jeff Goldblum,” says John Mastro, the band’s manager.
Hayley Bartels for NPR

A big part of the audience’s enjoyment comes from the joy Goldblum takes in working a room full of Goldblum acolytes and fans.

“I consider myself a social lubricant as much as a musician really,” Goldblum says.

During a recent show, Goldblum meets two musicians in the audience, Ryan Thorn and Jessica Hall. The three spontaneously start singing the aria, “Caro Mio Ben” together.

“This is the greatest moment ever,” says Hall.

“This is the greatest moment of my life,” Goldblum shoots back.

Goldblum’s willingness to interact with everyone, taking photos, and playing little games with people in the audience, tends to put many of the very nervous fans at ease.

“After hundreds of shows, I’m amused every time,” says Mastro, as Goldblum takes photo after photo with people in the audience. “Nobody works the room like Jeff Goldblum.”

‘Exactly How He Is In The Movies’

For many of the fans, the show has nothing to do with jazz.

“Jurassic Park was my favorite movie since I was a little kid,” says Jay Salahi. “I’ve probably seen that movie 200 times.”

The generation of people who grew up watching Goldblum star in 1990s blockbusters have embraced the actor.

Recently, both his “Ask Me Anything” (http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/20xynh/hi_this_is_jeff_goldblum_go_ahead_im_all_ears_ask/) on Reddit, and a fan tribute on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJelEXaPhJ8) to his eccentric way of laughing in Jurassic Park went viral online.

“As someone born in the 80s,” says Lucy Shanahan in between songs, “Jurassic Park was kind of up there in terms of life moments.”

And at least for fan Zach Johnson, Goldblum makes good on those expectations.

“His persona, his stage presence, how he is in person,” Johnson says, are “exactly how he is in the movies.”

The Show Comes First
Goldblum’s band is named The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, after a family friend back in Pittsburgh.

Goldblum’s band is named The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, after a family friend back in Pittsburgh.
Hayley Bartels for NPR

For the rotating group of musicians that plays with Goldblum, it’s been an odd but fun ride.

They perform loose, improvised versions of jazz standards like “Summertime,” “Watermelon Man” or “The Sidewinder.”

“I actually like to play things that I’m surprised that I’m playing, have never played before,” Goldblum says. “I like to cold read stuff and kind of, you know, make it up.”

In fact, Goldblum says, until very recently, The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra never rehearsed.

Between songs, Goldblum banters with the audience, plays the movie game, or assures people that he tied his bow tie himself. “I can undo it right now and show you,” he says of a green Brooks Brothers number. “It’s not a clip-on!”

What the group might lack in technical discipline, bassist Tim Emmons says, they make up in showmanship.

“Jeff’s much more personable than most band leaders,” Emmons says. “I go sometimes to play jazz gigs, and the people [in the band] don’t talk to the audience.”

Drummer Kenny Elliott says Goldblum provides a welcome shot of joy to the local jazz scene. When he got the call to perform with the group, he says, “I jumped out of my pants to do it!”

‘I Just Like To Play’

Goldblum makes clear that he has no “careerist ambitions” about his music. “I just like to play,” he says. At the end of the show, he’s fairly unassuming about the three-hour performance.

“I had no idea what we were gonna do, actually,” he says. “It was kind of fun, wasn’t it?”

He stays after the final set to chat with fans, take photos and say his goodbyes.

And if he’s not up to anything else, Goldblum will be out there again next Wednesday, working the room.
————————————————————

Tom Dreisbach is an associate producer with NPR’s weekend All Things Considered. NPR’s Daniel Hajek also contributed to this story.

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Frank Strazzeri (1930-2014)- JazzWax

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** Weekend Wax Bits
————————————————————

http://marcmyers.typepad.com/.a/6a00e008dca1f0883401a3fd0f5a62970b-popup
Frank Strazzeri (1930-2014), a gentle, bop pianist who studied at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y., and eventually settled on the West Coast in 1960 after touring with Charlie Ventura and Woody Herman, died May 9. He was 84.

http://marcmyers.typepad.com/.a/6a00e008dca1f0883401a3fd0f5a78970b-popup
Strazzeri wasn’t well known to many jazz fans, perhaps because he didn’t start recording steadily until he was 30, when he first appeared on a Terry Gibbs Quintet date. By then—1960—jazz was beginning to fade in popularity but Strazzeri managed to record with many West Coast artists, including Oliver Nelson and Art Pepper. In the 1970s, Strazzeri recorded as the leader of varying-sized groups for small Hollywood labels. In the 1980s, he recorded with Tal Farlow, Bill Perkins, Conte Candoli, Frank Rosolino and Mike Barone and others. Perhaps his best known album from this period was Chet Baker Sings and Plays from the Film ‘Let’s Get Lost.’

http://marcmyers.typepad.com/.a/6a00e008dca1f0883401a511befd78970c-popup
Strazzeri could play in virtually any style, from Dixieland to stride, but he resisted bombast, preferring instead to swing softly with space-rich chord voicings and provocatively jagged improvisational lines. One of his finest albums of this genre is Relaxin’, a solo date he recorded in July 1980 that’s available only on vinyl. (A special thanks to Mike Barone and David Langner)

Here’s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8yKfEtdC4s) Strazzeri last year backing singer Maki Maggie Inouye…

http://marcmyers.typepad.com/.a/6a00e008dca1f0883401a73dca3466970d-popup
Judy! I’m not a massive Judy Garland fan—her singing style was often tainted by the visual demands of her profession, which made her delivery excessively theatric. But I do love her distressed quality. One could argue that her high-strung, all-in performances on radio and film helped create an emotional template for rock and roll artists of the ’50s. One of my favorite Garland songs is The Man That Got Away. Here are two outtakes of the Skip Martin-arranged song from A Star Is Born (1954), with the film version in the final clip. Love those faux musicians on-screen and the over-acting piano player mashing his chewing the gum. I guess they needed the extra takes so the notoriously neurotic director George Cukor could figure out what Garland should wear in his first Technicolor film—and what kind of piano looked best…

Outtake #1 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wpl2NDEURWw) …

Outtake #2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaNxDlqiFwU) …

Film version (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooeuybwJAsE) …

http://marcmyers.typepad.com/.a/6a00e008dca1f0883401a3fd0f5b25970b-popup
The Civilized Cinema. On this Memorial Day Weekend, I thought I’d put up one of my favorite movies about World War II—The Victors (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1g3v3ANhZc) (1963). This rare film was directed by Carl Foreman and stars George Peppard, Eli Wallach, Melina Mercouri, Peter Fonda and George Hamilton. The film, shot on location in Europe, looks at the stark realities of war and occupation, with a focus on a platoon’s travels from Sicily to Berlin. An unvarnished plot so bleak and anti-war in tone it had to be made by a British studio.

Oddball album cover of the week.

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“Artists, I’ve called you here to come up with an album cover concept. But before we start, help yourself to the blotter acid.”

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Jerry Vale, Who Crooned Smoothly of Love, Is Dead at 83 – NYTimes.com

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** Jerry Vale, Who Crooned Smoothly of Love, Is Dead at 83
————————————————————

Photo
Jerry Vale in 1976.
Continue reading the main story

Jerry Vale, a pop crooner known for his velvety voice and the classic love songs he recorded in the 1950s and early ’60s, died on Sunday at his home in Palm Desert, Calif. He was 83.

His family confirmed his death.

Mr. Vale rose to stardom performing in supper clubs as a teenager, hitting the charts for the first time in 1953 with “You Can Never Give Me Back My Heart.” He was a fixture at Columbia Records, where he recorded more than 50 albums and had hits with songs like “Two Purple Shadows” and “Al Di La.” His biggest hit, “You Don’t Know Me,” peaked at No. 14 on Billboard’s Hot 100 in 1956.

Like so many of his fellow crooners — among them Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and Perry Como — Mr. Vale was Italian-American, and he helped popularize romantic Italian songs for American listeners with renditions of “Innamorata (Sweetheart)” in 1956 and “I Have but One Heart” in 1962.

As a teenager, he worked as an oiler alongside his father, an engineer, on excavations for projects like a sewage plant in Oyster Bay, on Long Island. “But then I got a break singing,” he said in a radio interview in 1984. “So, thank God, I made the right decision.”

Mr. Vale got his big break in 1950 while working at the Enchanted Room in Yonkers. There he met the singer Guy Mitchell, who arranged an audition for him with Mitch Miller, head of artists and repertoire at Columbia. He was signed to a contract and changed his name — he was born Genaro Louis Vitaliano — and his career was launched.

That career took him to Carnegie Hall as well as the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas, where he met and worked with the stars of his time, among them Jerry Lewis, Sammy Davis Jr. and Nat King Cole.

His autobiography, “Jerry Vale: A Singer’s Life,” written with Richard Grudens, was published in 2000. In it, he recalled meeting his longtime idol, Sinatra, in the early 1950s at Lindy’s Restaurant in New York City, a magnet for show business talent. When they were introduced, Sinatra stood up, an unusual gesture for big stars at the time. It stunned Mr. Vale.

“A few years ago I had heard so many negative stories about Frank that I was somewhat apprehensive to approach him,” he said. “To my absolute surprise, he wound up being quite amiable, and the most caring individual that I have ever known.”

The two became fast friends. Sinatra, who was a partner in the Sands Hotel, helped Mr. Vale get his first gig there, a two-week engagement that was extended to 22 weeks after an owner, Jack Entratter, heard Mr. Vale’s voice.

After Mr. Vale and his wife, Rita, moved to California, the two became a constant presence at Sinatra’s ranch in Rancho Mirage. He took part in the annual Frank Sinatra Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament for several years and once performed at the event in 1996.

In 1963 he hired a 40-piece band and eight background singers to record the national anthem. The recording became a fixture at sporting events for years and was the first song inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.

Mr. Vale made cameo appearances as himself in the films “Goodfellas” (1990) and “Casino” (1995), both directed by Martin Scorsese, and in the television series “The Sopranos.”

He was born on July 8, 1930, in the Bronx. In 1959 he married Rita Grapel, an actress who appeared on the television dramatic anthology series “Studio One in Hollywood (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040051/?ref_=nmbio_mbio) ” on CBS and “The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040049/?ref_=nmbio_mbio) ” on NBC and in the 1952 film “The Thief (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045230/?ref_=nmbio_mbio) .”

She survives him, as do their son, a daughter and three grandchildren.
Correction: May 19, 2014

An earlier version of this obituary misidentified the person who signed Mr. Vale to a recording contract. He was signed by Mitch Miller, not by Guy Mitchell.
Correction: May 21, 2014

An obituary in some late editions on Monday about the singer Jerry Vale misspelled the surname of an owner of the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas, where Mr. Vale performed early in his career. He was Jack Entratter, not Enratter. The obituary also misstated the maiden name of Mr. Vale’s wife. She was Rita Grapel, not Vale.

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Inventor updates ’70s creation to bring 3-D vision to music – Music – The Boston Globe

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** Inventor brings 3-D vision to music
————————————————————
Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Bill Sebastian inside a prototype of a dome used for displaying visual music content. Sebastian is the founder of Visual Music Systems, which is developing technology to make music a fully visual experience.

On the edge of the woods in Falmouth rests the decaying hulk of one man’s youthful ambition. It’s the bones and innards of an instrument that was designed to facilitate a pretty big notion: human contact with another dimension.

The story behind its creation — and rebirth — involves the Vietnam War, New Kids on the Block, the early days of the Internet, and one MIT dropout’s lifelong determination.
Sun Ra performed on keyboards at Nightstage June 10, 1986.

Phil Spring/Globe Staff

Sun Ra performed on keyboards at Nightstage June 10, 1986.

In the late 1970s, the instrument led to concert appearances with the late, cosmically attuned jazz bandleader Sun Ra. Now Bill Sebastian, 61, the man who built the instrument, has been working in a Boston office on his invention’s digital successor, which he’s almost ready to show the world.

It is a kind of optical synthesizer called the Outerspace Visual Communicator, or OVC.

Designed to let the user “play” with images as part of a musical composition, the original OVC was a custom-built keyboard featuring an array of sensors to be brushed with fingertips (“like fingerpainting”). It created dynamic color changes in the lights on a structure overhead, such as a dome over a concert stage.

Sebastian performed with the OVC in a few extended runs with Sun Ra and his big band, the Arkestra.
For years, the early OVC lay ignored in the backyard of Sebastian’s home in Falmouth.

David Black

For years, the early OVC lay ignored in the backyard of Sebastian’s home in Falmouth.

The new visual synthesizer — this one in 3-D — is his second attempt to take “the most powerful art form, music, and make it available to our most powerful sense, which is vision,” Sebastian said one recent evening.

“We really feel this is the art form of the 21st century.”

For the past several months, two fellow engineers and computer programmers have been working with Sebastian at his company Visual Music Systems, headquartered in a mixed-use office space above a sub shop near Downtown Crossing.

The team has been working on proprietary computer programs and prototypes of the new OVC, which, in place of the keyboard and buttons, is operated by hand controllers that look a bit like robotic arms fitted with valves (like those of a trumpet) and sliders (roughly analogous to the frets on a guitar). Sebastian envisions applications for the 3-D OVC ranging from planetariums to virtual reality headsets.

In the office, a half-dozen pine desks line the white-painted brick walls, leading to a second work space dominated by a bank of oversized monitors, like an editing suite. On the wall to the right hangs a neat array of colorful photos of Sun Ra and his band.

In the back corner, opposite an open kitchen, is a makeshift 2-by-4 framework closed off with heavy black canvas. Inside, the space is dominated by a large, curved fiberglass screen. Several home projectors fitted with wide-angle lenses target the screen from a raised platform.
Joshua Slocum, an engineer with Bill Sebastian’s Visual Music Systems, models a hand controller (left) for Sebastian’s Outerspace Visual Communicator.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Joshua Slocum, an engineer with Bill Sebastian’s Visual Music Systems, models a hand controller (left) for Sebastian’s Outerspace Visual Communicator.

“Imagine you wanted to record the first sound in your head — let’s say it’s Beethoven — but first you had to build a violin, and ask questions like, what’s a loudspeaker? If you had to build everything? This is kind of like that,” says Sebastian of his operation.

Jeffrey Ventrella is a musician, artist, and computer programmer who studied at the MIT Media Lab in the early 1990s. He helped Sebastian design the “visual language” of the new OVC, creating vividly colored particle systems and “dancing fractals.”

Though Sebastian plays down the notion that he’s a synesthete, that is, someone who “sees” or experiences sound as color, Ventrella says the definition can be broadened. “Bill is really going for something that’s much more of a language, less a sensory wash,” says Ventrella on the phone from his home north of San Francisco. “It’s very much connected to the musical language, and most of us agree there’s a language to music.”

The real core value of the project, Ventrella says, “is that these visual graphics will be performed by a person or several people in conjunction with music. I like the idea that it’s a pure form of artistic expression, which of course can be hard to market or build a business around.”

Sebastian is well aware the concept can sound baffling, and more than a little nutty, to a skeptical audience. As a kid growing up in Texas, he was an “archetypal nerd techie” who loved to take things apart to see how they worked. He came here to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but was quickly disillusioned.

It was the era of the Vietnam War, he says, and he began protesting. “I couldn’t deal with anything but politics. The world was not the place to be an engineer in 1970. There was this massive technological war on poor people, and I didn’t want to be a part of that.”

Like so many students of the time, he was excited by the music and enticed by mood-altering substances.

“A lot of us were trying everything we could to try to understand anything we could,” he says, after some hesitation, noting that he’s been working in the “straight” world of business for decades. He studied Carl Jung’s “multitiered levels of self-consciousness and the concept of the collective subconscious,” always asking himself, what’s behind the next door?

Listening to artists such as Jimi Hendrix, he began to gather his earliest thoughts about the intersection between music and vision. He sent a design to the Jefferson Airplane, but got no reply.

Then in 1973, a friend urged Sebastian to see Sun Ra at the old nightclub Paul’s Mall on Boylston Street. He was instantly taken by the high-concept, wildly costumed bandleader, who often claimed he was from Saturn, and his “intergalactic” Arkestra (which included saxophonist Pat Patrick, whose son, Deval, is now the governor).

“I said, yep, that’s it,” Sebastian recalls.

He dropped out of MIT and spent the next four years building the OVC, scavenging for used electronics at Eli Heffron’s in Cambridge and devising parts during down time in his job as a machinist. He completed the job while holed up in a farmhouse in the Texas woods, loaded it into a U-Haul and drove it back to Boston to present it to Sun Ra. He caught up with the musician at a Boston show a month after his return.

“I said, ‘Let me visualize soundwaves,’ ” Sebastian recalls. “To him, it was totally natural. Three or four days later, I was driving him back to Philadelphia,” where Sun Ra was based at the time.

“We both had this conception that music is not just sound — it’s a way of communicating alternative realities to people. He probably understood the instrument much better than I did.”

From 1978 to ’80, Sebastian joined the Arkestra for several series of shows, in performance lofts in Boston and New York and one memorable week at Massachusetts College of Art. The OVC reached the pinnacle of its modest cultural success two years later, when the Jonzun Crew released their electronic funk song “Pack Jam (Look Out for the OVC).”

“It had all this mystique to it,” says author Dave Tompkins, who wrote about Sebastian and the OVC in “How to Wreck a Nice Beach,” his 2010 book about the origins of the voice-altering tool called the vocoder.

“You assumed it wasn’t real,” Tompkins continues. “It had this sort of sinister dimension to it.”

In those years, Sebastian was sharing a house in Roxbury with members of The Johnson Brothers band, led by Michael and Larry, with whom he’d played keyboards in a soul and funk cover band. Larry, changing his name to Maurice Starr, would soon became a mentor to Boston pop acts New Edition and New Kids on the Block.

Sebastian worked with the producers as an engineer and an unofficial business partner. The old house was chaotic, he says: “My bedroom was the recording room. Peter Wolf called it the ‘House of Hits.’ ”

With the bands blowing up, Sebastian was busy building a downtown recording studio called Mission Control, which was later moved out to suburban Westford. He had no time for the OVC, which was impractical anyway; it took at least a week to set up. Eventually, he moved it to the backyard behind his new home in Falmouth, where he and his wife, Rita, were raising their daughters.

Beginning in the late 1980s, Sebastian worked in fits and starts on the design for a new, 3-D version of the OVC. But he ran out of money for the project, and focused his attention on family life and building his telecommunications compressors — devices that enabled the transmission of increasing amounts of data through limited passages.

“All my daughters’ baseball games and stuff contributed to that 20-year blackout period,” Sebastian said. “I didn’t think about the instrument most of that time.”

While researching his book on the vocoder, Tompkins visited Sebastian in Falmouth one winter day. He had to be coaxed into talking about his sidetracked project.

“It had consumed a big part of his life, and he had to let it go,” Tompkins says. “I’m sure that was incredibly hard.” When Tompkins asked Sebastian to recall what it was like playing with Sun Ra, “He closed his eyes tight. The memories were so intense, it was almost like he was blacking out. He was really living this vision.”

After cutting a few lucrative deals for his compressor devices, Sebastian realized it was finally time to revisit the OVC.

“Certainly, my whole life was about the music and this,” he says. “There’s nothing else in the world I wanted to do.”

Now Sebastian and his team of engineers are on the verge of putting the various elements together. He’s been warning his team that, as with the original OVC, the finished product is likely not to seem so finished at first.

“It’ll be terrible when it’s first done,” he says. “When I first looked at [the original OVC], I said, oh, my God, I’ve just wasted 4½ years.”

But soon enough, they will teach themselves to master the instrument. Sebastian is certain that will be “a magic moment.”

“I’ve already conditioned everyone in the company: First you build it, then you have to discover it,” he says. “They’re two separate tasks, and they’re both really daunting.”

The potential life-changing perceptions he imagines the OVC offering go far beyond simple sensory pleasures, he says.

“That’s how I justify what I’m doing to my wife,” Sebastian says. “My theory is, if you get people to use their minds differently, they’ll look at the world differently.

“It could be a pretty phenomenal experience for the human race. That’s the thing you hope for.”

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Joe Wilder remembered, Dolphy fest | New York Amsterdam News: The new Black view

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** Joe Wilder remembered, Dolphy fest
————————————————————
Joe Wilder

Joe Wilder, the understated trumpeter with the smooth tone, a longtime member of Count Basie’s Orchestra and one of the first African-American musicians to play in the pit bands of Broadway shows, died on May 9. Wilder was 92 years old and a resident of Manhattan for many years.

Wilder, an elegant gentleman who was never seen without a suit and tie, received the Temple University Jazz Master’s Hall of Fame Award in 2006 and became a 2008 recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts’ NEA Jazz Masters Award.

He also played with Cab Calloway, Dizzy Gillespie, Jimmie Lunceford, Lionel Hampton, Benny Carter and Benny Goodman. Due to his soft sound, he was enlisted by such vocalists as Lena Horne, Billie Holiday and Dinah Washington. Wilder also played flugelhorn and cornet, which added to his versatility.

He was born in Colwyn, Pa., on Feb. 22, 1922, in a family of musicians; his father, Curtis Wilder, was a bandleader and bassist, and his older brother Curtis Jr. also played bass. As a youngster, Wilder began with the cornet and performed on the radio program “Parisian Tailor’s Colored Kiddies of the Air,” where he and the other young musicians were backed up by the bands of Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong, who were then playing at the Lincoln Theater.

Wilder attended Mastbaum Technical High School before taking his first jazz gig touring with the Les Hite band at age 19. Wilder was in the first wave of young Black men that were able to join the U.S. Marine Corps. He began in special weapons and eventually transferred to the headquarter’s band and later was promoted to assistant bandmaster.

He later studied classical music at the Manhattan School of Music, where he graduated in 1953.

The trumpeter was one of the first African-American musicians to become a member of Broadway’s elite pit band, playing in the 1950 musical revue “Alive and Kicking.” Later, when he joined the pit band of “Guys and Dolls,” he met two other Black members, trombonist Benny Morton and pianist Billy Kyle. This was a rare exception, because Blacks still weren’t totally accepted in the pit. In 1955 the lyricist Cole Porter personally requested Wilder for his Broadway show “Silk Stockings.”

From 1957 to 1974, Wilder was instrumental, along with Milt Hinton and others, in integrating network radio studio bands, and television later followed. He was a member of the ABC-TV ensemble where he was heard on such shows as “The Voice of Firestone” and “The Dick Cavett Show.” He did studio work for ABC-TV while building his reputation as a soloist with his albums for Savoy and Columbia.

In recording studios, he worked with vocalists that included Harry Belafonte, Tony Bennett, Eileen Farrell, Billie Holiday and Johnny Mathis. In the 1980s, he was in the pit band for the long-running Broadway musical “42nd Street.” His dream to play classical music eventually came true when he was asked on a few occasions to perform with the New York Philharmonic.

A soft-spoken gentlemen who was always ready to advise younger musicians, Wilder had a warm smile that will be missed.
| Read More >> (safari-reader://amsterdamnews.com/news/2014/may/22/joe-wilder-remembered-dolphy-fest/?page=2)
Page 2 of 2
Joe Wilder

There is always a jazz festival going on, but one of the most innovative of the year will be “Eric Dolphy: Freedom of Sound” at Montclair State University Memorial Auditorium in Montclair, N.J., presented by Seed Artists during Memorial Day weekend (May 30, 7-10:30 p.m. and May 31, 5-10:30 p.m.)

The musicians honoring Dolphy will include Richard Davis (both nights), Grachan Moncur III, Henry Threadgill, Andrew Cyrille, Oliver Lake, Don Byron, Vernon Reid, the Dolphy Bass Clarinet Quartet with Howard Johnson, Don Byron, Marty Ehrlich, Oscar Noriega and other innovators who are extending Dolphy’s legacy.

These musicians will be performing works by Dolphy that were never recorded or performed, from solo bass clarinet to an ensemble conducted by flutist and Dolphy scholar James Newton; this will be their world premiere.

Dolphy, a native of Los Angeles, Calif., explored music as a multi-instrumentalist playing alto saxophone, flute, bass clarinet, piccolo, baritone saxophone and clarinet.

While many associate him with avant-garde or free jazz, Dolphy was a voyager whose compositions travelled through the genres of bebop, classical Stravinsky, gospel, blues, Latin, African Aboriginal vocals and the sounds of the city. Like Frank Wess, he was one of the influential early jazz flute soloists. While playing with Chico Hamilton, he established the bass clarinet as a solo jazz instrument.

His Blue Note recording “Out to Lunch” with Freddie Hubbard, Tony Williams, Richard Davis and Bobby Hutchinson is focused, with an open structure. He has played and recorded with Ron Carter, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus (his mentor and collaborator), Roy Haynes, Abbey Lincoln, Ornette Coleman, Booker Little, Gunther Schuller, Jaki Byard and Oliver Nelson.

Dolphy’s album “Live at the Five Spot” (1961Prestige) in Manhattan with Booker Little, Mal Waldron, Richard Davis and Ed Blackwell is considered a classic, with his hard-hitting solos that travel the stratosphere. Dolphy was a visionary on a mission, who died at the early age of 36, on June 29, 1964, in a Berlin Hospital.

Proceeds will benefit Jazz Foundation of America and the Montclair Academy of Dance and Laboratory of Music. $20 per evening, $25 at the door. For complete listings, call 888-718-4253 or visit seedartists.org (http://www.seedartists.org/) .

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▶ THE EIGHT TRACK MUSEUM GUIDED TOUR WITH BUCKS BURNETT – YouTube

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Bucks Burnett offers a brief glimpse of just some of the treasures and oddities awaiting guests at The Eight Track Museum in Dallas, Texas.

We will have more than 200 different jazz titles that range from Jelly Roll Morton, Dixieland, big band swing, bebop, post bop and modern jazz, including several contemporary artists. Artists include Stan Getz, Benny Goodman, Miles Davis, Bud Powell, Artie Shaw, John Coltrane and Billie Holiday. Most $3.

We’ll also have multiple copies of recent titles from Nonesuch by Joshua Redman, Nicholas Payton and Bill Frisell PLUS Japanese pressings of several reissued Pat Matheny albums. PLUS, PLUS, copies of “Turn Out the Stars” a 6 CD set by Bill Evans live at the Village Vanguard in 1980. Good prices for all, like $45 for “Turn Out the Stars”

Oh, and on the R&B-side there’s the Ray Charles 8-CD box set: PURE GENIUS – the complete Atlantic recordings for $80. And beautiful Classical LP, so many on great condition, all $1

We also need donations to build the collection. Today was a banner day as people donated these 78s “Southern Exposure” by Josh White 1941 and Billie Holiday’s first recording of “Strange Fruit” 1939.

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Jazz @ the next ARC sale

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ARChive of Contemporary Music

54 White Street

New York City, 10013

tel : 212-226-6967

e : arcmusic@inch.com

www.arcmusic.org

June 7—15, 2014

We will have more than 200 different jazz titles that range from Jelly Roll Morton, Dixieland, big band swing, bebop, post bop and modern jazz, including several contemporary artists. Artists include Stan Getz, Benny Goodman, Miles Davis, Bud Powell, Artie Shaw, John Coltrane and Billie Holiday. Most $3.

We’ll also have multiple copies of recent titles from Nonesuch by Joshua Redman, Nicholas Payton and Bill Frisell PLUS Japanese pressings of several reissued Pat Matheny albums. PLUS, PLUS, copies of “Turn Out the Stars” a 6 CD set by Bill Evans live at the Village Vanguard in 1980. Good prices for all, like $45 for “Turn Out the Stars”

Oh, and on the R&B-side there’s the Ray Charles 8-CD box set: PURE GENIUS – the complete Atlantic recordings for $80. And beautiful Classical LP, so many on great condition, all $1

We also need donations to build the collection. Today was a banner day as people donated these 78s “Southern Exposure” by Josh White 1941 and Billie Holiday’s first recording of “Strange Fruit” 1939.

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Announcing Detroit Sound Conservancy’s inaugural conference

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Will Friedwald’s “CLIP JOINT: A Video Music Mixtape”

(Our first official show – Tuesday April 29 – was packed to capacity! OPA!)

sizzle / sample / promo reel (opening & closing) youtu.be/HLWxhvAoww4>

full details on Broadway World bit.ly/1hXc0rG>

To reserve a seat, RSVP to : Bob Levis

Upcoming events :

CLIP JOINT at the PLAYER’S CLUB (Tuesday, May 27 – 7 PM – 16 Gramercy Park South)

THE FRIAR’S CLUB PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH ERVIN DRAKE (Monday, June 9)

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL JAZZ SCENE

May 16, 2014: WEEKEND OF JAZZ ALL-STARS
NYU Jazz Expo, the New York Hot Jazz Festival and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
1gxa9jn >

May 9, 2014: REVISITING CARSON AND VAUDEVILLE
Bria Skonberg, Marilyn Maye’s Tribute to Johnny Carson and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/Rx7xpP>

May 2, 2014: Sparring Duets and Classic Cabaret
Denny Zeitlin, Vocalist Kendra Shank and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
http://on.wsj.com/1pWdYm0

April 25, 2014: All-Star Tributes and Tall Tales
Ervin Drake at 95, Tommy Tune and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1fyU0Uy>

April 18, 2014: Babs’s Baby Sister; a Folk Fest
Barbra Streisand’s Younger Sister, Roslyn Kind, the Brooklyn Folk Festival and More in the Jazz Scene
online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304810904579507643919567358>

April 11, 2014: Gypsy Jazz and 15 Years of Eternity
Fishtank Ensemble and David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Eternity Band in This Week’s Jazz Scene
online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304058204579493381442118834>

April 7, 2014: FETING A JAZZ LEGACY
Jazz at Lincoln Center honors Dave Brubeck
on.wsj.com/PY7QsW>

April 4, 2014: WORLD JAZZ AND AN UNSUNG WORDSMITH
Chick Corea, Johnny O’Neal and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1gZpUhc>

March 28, 2014: VETERANS OF SAX AND STAGE
Lew Tabackin, Roy Nathanson & Sotto Voce and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1phDwGw>

March 21, 2104: A MAMBO LEGACY AND A UKULELE VIRTUOSO
on.wsj.com/1etL3hK>

March 14, 2014: SATCHMO, SHIRLEY JONES AND SOUL JAZZ
A New Play and a Cabaret Debut in this Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1o0F9Yi>

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Voice of America : Blue Note Records Celebrates 75th Anniversary

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** Blue Note Records Celebrates 75th Anniversary
————————————————————
FILE – An original handwritten song by Lionel Hampton titled “Hamp’s Boogie Woogie” is seen at the Colored Musicians Club in Buffalo, New York, Jan. 14, 2005.

This year marks an important anniversary for American jazz, one that – on a number of occasions – looked like it would never arrive. The legendary Blue Note record label is celebratating its 75th birthday.
Nothing that becomes legendary starts out that way. In 1939 Blue Notes Records was the grain of an idea by Alfred Lion and Frank Wolff – two Germans who fell in love with music like that by the boogie-woogie piano player, Albert Ammons.
They first heard jazz improvisation as young men in Germany during the early years of the Nazi regime. Richard Havers is writing a book about Blue Note, called “Uncompromising Expressions.” He says that, to the Nazis …“jazz was everything that they hated. It was freedom of expression. It was not regimented. It didn’t go to a militaristic beat.”
Lion and Wolff pursued their love of jazz and freedom by leaving Germany for the United States. Shortly after arriving and hearing Ammons and another boogie-woogie piano-player, Meade “Lux” Lewis, they scratched together some money, put Ammons in a studio, and Blue Note Records was born. The label was swimming against the tide by promoting boogie-woogie.

Blue Note Records Celebrates 75th Anniversary

* Playlist
* Download (http://realaudio.rferl.org/voa/ENGL/2014/04/30/9b9da8c0-6bb0-4f67-a733-058329f4082d.mp3)

“Back then it was all about dancing,” said Dan Ouellette, who has written a book about Blue Note called “Playing By Ear.” .
And people were not dancing to boogie-woogie piano. Ouellette says Alfred Lion’s approach was more like a museum curator than a record producer.
“He wanted to document this music,” he said. “His whole philosophy is that jazz is an art form.”
Treating artists as artists and swimming against the tide became hallmarks of Blue Note jazz, an approach that finally paid off in the 1940s, when jazz shifted, away from the dance music of the Big Band Era and toward a new form that came to be called “Bebop.”
According to Havers, “Lion quickly realized that jazz was moving in a different direction, and the first of the new wave of artists that he recorded was Thelonious Monk, who he absolutely adored.”
“Thelonious Monk was famous for playing the wrong notes,” said Ouellette. “Many people thought it was just rubbish.”

But while much of the music business didn’t understand artists like Monk, Richard Havers says this was another example of Blue Note treating artists like artists.
“Alfred Lion gave his artists the freedom to do what they wanted to do,” he said. “They felt they were artists. They were not money machines.”
Blue Note was well respected and had some financial success, but by the 1960s, Ouellette says, things were not looking good for Blue Note or jazz.
“Rock music, and the beginnings of funk were coming around,” he said. “People are running away in droves because of rock music.”
In 1967, Alfred Lion sold Blue Note to another record company. They drove it into the ground. In a rush to make money quickly, they stopped paying for rehearsal time and otherwise alienated the label’s biggest stars, most of whom left to go to other record companies. The label got a reprieve in 1981 and had another long run of artistic success, but by the early 2000s, according to the current head of Blue Note, producer Don Was.
“There was a lot of talk about closing the label down, making it a website that sold catalogue and blue t-shirts,” he said.
Instead the label decided to revive itself again.
Mainly by turning back to a way of working that would make Alfred Lion proud. According to current Blue Note artist, Jason Moran, today, as they did in the past,
“People just went in and they make their music,” he said. “You follow the intuition of the artist and the artists that they work with, and you come together to make a recording.”
This return to the old ways is paying off, according to Dan Ouellette.
“The music that you are hearing today with some young artists like Robert Glasper and Jason Moran, the music is evolving, it’s not staying put, it’s not dying,” he said.

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Will Friedwald’s “CLIP JOINT: A Video Music Mixtape”

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Will Friedwald’s “CLIP JOINT: A Video Music Mixtape”

(Our first official show – Tuesday April 29 – was packed to capacity! OPA!)

sizzle / sample / promo reel (opening & closing) youtu.be/HLWxhvAoww4>

full details on Broadway World bit.ly/1hXc0rG>

To reserve a seat, RSVP to : Bob Levis

Upcoming events :

CLIP JOINT at the PLAYER’S CLUB (Tuesday, May 27 – 7 PM – 16 Gramercy Park South)

THE FRIAR’S CLUB PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH ERVIN DRAKE (Monday, June 9)

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL JAZZ SCENE

May 16, 2014: WEEKEND OF JAZZ ALL-STARS
NYU Jazz Expo, the New York Hot Jazz Festival and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
1gxa9jn >

May 9, 2014: REVISITING CARSON AND VAUDEVILLE
Bria Skonberg, Marilyn Maye’s Tribute to Johnny Carson and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/Rx7xpP>

May 2, 2014: Sparring Duets and Classic Cabaret
Denny Zeitlin, Vocalist Kendra Shank and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
http://on.wsj.com/1pWdYm0

April 25, 2014: All-Star Tributes and Tall Tales
Ervin Drake at 95, Tommy Tune and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1fyU0Uy>

April 18, 2014: Babs’s Baby Sister; a Folk Fest
Barbra Streisand’s Younger Sister, Roslyn Kind, the Brooklyn Folk Festival and More in the Jazz Scene
online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304810904579507643919567358>

April 11, 2014: Gypsy Jazz and 15 Years of Eternity
Fishtank Ensemble and David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Eternity Band in This Week’s Jazz Scene
online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304058204579493381442118834>

April 7, 2014: FETING A JAZZ LEGACY
Jazz at Lincoln Center honors Dave Brubeck
on.wsj.com/PY7QsW>

April 4, 2014: WORLD JAZZ AND AN UNSUNG WORDSMITH
Chick Corea, Johnny O’Neal and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1gZpUhc>

March 28, 2014: VETERANS OF SAX AND STAGE
Lew Tabackin, Roy Nathanson & Sotto Voce and More in This Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1phDwGw>

March 21, 2104: A MAMBO LEGACY AND A UKULELE VIRTUOSO
on.wsj.com/1etL3hK>

March 14, 2014: SATCHMO, SHIRLEY JONES AND SOUL JAZZ
A New Play and a Cabaret Debut in this Week’s Jazz Scene
on.wsj.com/1o0F9Yi>

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Warwick, Ny 10990
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Wanted: Birthday Cards for Lionel Ferbos on his 103rd Birthday

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
May 19, 2014

To: Listings/Critics/Features
From: Jazz Promo Services
Press Contact: Jim Eigo,
ji (mailto:jazzpromo@earthlink.net) m@jazzpromoservices.com
www.jazzpromoservices.com (https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/ )
It’s that wonderful time of the year when we have the opportunity to wish Lionel Ferbos a
Happy Birthday.

Mr. Ferbos will celebrate his 103rd Birthday on Thursday, July 17.

As we have done in the past, we are asking you to send birthday cards to Mr. Ferbos.

Lionel Ferbos Sr.
5543 Press Drive
New Orleans, LA
70126

(Tell a friend)

Mr. Ferbos performs at Nickel-A-Dance, October 2014

This E Mail Is Being Sent by:
Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com (mailto:jim@jazzpromoservices.com)
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

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the ARChive of Contemporary Music swingin’ SUMMER record + cd sale 2014

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
May 18, 2014

To: Listings/Critics/Features
From: Jazz Promo Services
Press Contact: Jim Eigo,
ji (mailto:jazzpromo@earthlink.net) m@jazzpromoservices.com
www.jazzpromoservices.com (https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/ )

the ARChive of Contemporary Music

swingin’ SUMMER record + cd sale 2014

WHAT

The ARChive of Contemporary Music’s Swingin’ Summer Record & CD sale.

WHY

To help support the ARChive : a not-for-profit music library with over 2,25 million sound recordings –

America’s largest and BEST popular music collection.

WHERE

At our ground floor office, Lower Manhattan : 54 White St. 3 short blocks south of Canal, between

Broadway & Church St in Tribeca. Take the #1 train to Franklin, or any train to Canal.

WHEN

Saturday, June 7 – Sunday, June 15 Everyday 11 am. to 6 pm

Admission is free! New recordings added daily. Over 20,000 items for sale

CDs are NEW donations from record companies and collectors, NOT used, returns or defects!

Mostly pop + rock recordings. Collectible LPs are priced below book/online value.

Hundreds of CDs are priced at $1 to $5 each. Just released NEW & HOT CDs are $5 – $10.

OUR CDS ARE CHEAPER THAN DOWNLOADING!

THIS SUMMER specials – Piles of Japanese pressings of Nonesuch CDs • Incredible selection of

Jazz CDs • original vintage 60s psychedelic posters from the Gande Ballroom in Detroit • RARE

Fillmore East programs • Turntables + audio equipment • Vintage Rock + music magazines

For the dis-en-vinyled – our Astroturf Yard Sale section of vintage kitchen wares and clothing!!!

PLUS – Shelves of music books • Classic Rock LPs African, Reggae & world-music releases

MOST Classical LPs $1.00 or LESS • videos + DVDs

COCKTAIL PARTY – ARChive Members are invited to a cocktail party Thursday, June 5.

Members shop before the general public. JOIN or call for info: 212-226-6967.

Generous party donors : Bonnie’s Grill in Brooklyn, Tribeca’s Bubble Lounge and Two

Boots everywhere. Once again, Kenny hipster city bus driver is bartender for a day.

ABOUT US – ARC is a not-for-profit archive, library and research center. We collect, preserve

and provide information on popular music from 1950 to the present. ARC keeps two copies of all

recordings released in America. Columbia University is our academic partner.

Board of Advisors : David Bowie, Jellybean Benitez, Jonathan Demme, Youssou N’Dour, Keith

Richards, Nile Rodgers, Todd Rundgren, Fred Schneider, Martin Scorsese, Paul Simon, Mike Stoller.

———————————————————————————————————————–

ARChive of Contemporary Music • 54 White Street, Tribeca / NY, 10013

tel : (212) 226-6967 e-mail : info@arcmusic.org

The amazing NEW WEBSITE is at : www.arcmusic.org

For the first time access to our catalog and hundreds of rare, unusual and useful images

———————————————————————————————————————–

SUPPORT LOWER MANHATTAN!

LINK TO OUR SALE ON THE WEB HTTP://WWW.ARCMUSIC.ORG/SUPPORT/RECORD-SALE/

—————————————————————————————————————————–

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE PLEASE ANNOUNCE OR LIST PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

Graphics and photos available

This E Mail Is Being Sent by:
Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com (mailto:jim@jazzpromoservices.com)
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDvUe6fkNLU) HERE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDvUe6fkNLU&feature=player_embedded)

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Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

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269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

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White-Smith Music case: A terrible 1908 Supreme Court decision on player pianos.

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http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/history_of_innovation/2014/05/white_smith_music_case_a_terrible_1908_supreme_court_decision_on_player.html

** Scales of Justice
————————————————————
Player piano. The player piano deeply troubled composers at the time of its introduction.

Courtesy of Rama/Musée Baud

Way before Spotify, stereos, or even radio, Americans who wanted to listen to music at home had one choice: They could play it themselves. This changed by the 1890s, when a hot new technology arrived: the player piano. Player pianos were miraculous in their ability to play popular songs and old standards alike while people sang along, danced, or just enjoyed the sounds. But as with a lot of newfangled machines, not everyone loved the player piano.

In particular, the technology deeply troubled composers, such as the famed John Philip Sousa. Sousa worried that the pianos would kill the public’s demand for sheet music, and copyright royalties from the sale of sheet music were what paid composers’ bills. To make matters worse, the player piano companies refused to pay royalties for the songs they put on piano rolls—scrolls of paper with holes punched out in patterns. People couldn’t read the rolls; they spoke only to machines. And on that ground, the player piano companies argued that the rolls did not “copy” songs, and so could be manufactured and distributed without the need to pay royalties.

This was an exceptionally stupid argument. Sheet music and player piano rolls both copy songs; they just use different languages. What matters is what comes out when the language is translated. And for both, the answer is the same: music.

So the issue wasn’t terribly difficult, but apparently it was complicated enough to fool the Supreme Court. In a 1908 case called White-Smith Music Publishing Co. v. Apollo Co., the Supreme Court sided with the player piano companies. The court said that because humans couldn’t read player piano rolls, they were not in fact copies, and as a result, composers like Sousa couldn’t demand any royalties.

The conventional wisdom is that no one will innovate if others can copy freely. Why invest the time to invent a better mousetrap, or write a great song, if someone can just take the fruit of your hard work and sell it themselves? This basic logic—that copying is bad for creativity—is the fundamental reason we have patent and copyright law. These rules exist to make sure that copying is only legal when the creator agrees to it. Unauthorized copying—as anyone who has watched a DVD with an FBI warning at the start knows—is against the law.

So when, more than a century ago, the Supreme Court declared that copying by player piano companies was just fine, we saw the beginning of a process that culminated in the death of American songwriting. Songwriters stopped writing, fearful that the piano roll companies would just steal their new songs and feed the expanding market for player pianos at home. Thanks to the Supreme Court, the golden age of American song essentially ended in 1908.

In creating the cover song, the Congress of a century ago had no idea it would let loose one of the great innovative forces in music.

If something seems wrong about this story, it’s because the last part is completely false. As we all know, the golden age of American songwriting did not end in 1908. In fact, geniuses such as George Gershwin and Cole Porter were still kids when White-Smith Publishing was decided. Nearly all the “great American standards” were written in the decades after White-Smith Publishing. The reason American songwriting not only survived the onslaught of the player piano, but thrived, tells us a lot about how creativity really works.

The first important thing to know is that the actual result in White-Smith Publishing lasted but a year before it was overturned by Congress. The Copyright Act of 1909 extended the law to cover all “mechanical” reproductions of songs, whether read by people or machines. At the same time, however, Congress did a very important thing: It mandated that all songs would be subject to what lawyers called a “compulsory license.” This meant that any musician could copy another’s song without asking permission, so long as they paid a low standardized fee to the songwriter ($0.02 per copy, originally, and quite a bit lower, adjusted for inflation, today). So on the one hand, Congress overthrew the argument that player piano rolls were not songs. But on the other, Congress set everyone free to copy, just so long as a small fee was paid.

So why did Congress create this unusual system of legal copying? Because it was afraid of one company—Aeolian. That firm is long gone. But in the early part of the 20^th century, Congress viewed Aeolian as something like the Microsoft or Google of the nascent player piano market.

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PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

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USA

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Jazz St. Louis schedules Rich McDonnell tribute concert : Entertainment

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http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-schedules-rich-mcdonnell-tribute-concert/article_d5b82328-b6f2-505f-8774-e14356b2b763.html

** Jazz St. Louis schedules Rich McDonnell tribute concert
————————————————————

1 (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-schedules-rich-mcdonnell-tribute-concert/article_d5b82328-b6f2-505f-8774-e14356b2b763.html#)

Print (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-schedules-rich-mcdonnell-tribute-concert/article_d5b82328-b6f2-505f-8774-e14356b2b763.html?print=true&cid=print)

Richard McDonnell

Kevin Johnson (http://www.stltoday.com/users/profile/kjohnson)

Richard McDonnell
17 hours ago • By Kevin C. Johnson kjohnson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8191 (http://www.stltoday.com/search/?l=50&sd=desc&s=start_time&f=html&byline=By%20Kevin%20C.%20Johnson%0Akjohnson%40post-dispatch.com%0A314-340-8191)
http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-schedules-rich-mcdonnell-tribute-concert/article_d5b82328-b6f2-505f-8774-e14356b2b763.html?mode=comments

** MAXJAZZ owner Richard McDonnell dies (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/maxjazz-owner-richard-mcdonnell-dies/article_35e6fa36-6c1a-5a87-9836-b74fab8fb4ed.html)
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http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/maxjazz-owner-richard-mcdonnell-dies/article_35e6fa36-6c1a-5a87-9836-b74fab8fb4ed.html

Jazz enthusiast started the Grammy-nominated record label in his living room in 1997. Read more (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/maxjazz-owner-richard-mcdonnell-dies/article_35e6fa36-6c1a-5a87-9836-b74fab8fb4ed.html)

** Jazz St. Louis names the best of MAXJAZZ releases (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-names-the-best-of-maxjazz-releases/article_737f929f-9061-5871-9f5b-ec9841124d28.html)
————————————————————
http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-names-the-best-of-maxjazz-releases/article_737f929f-9061-5871-9f5b-ec9841124d28.html

We’re still saddened and shocked by the death last weekend of Richard McDonnell, the founder of the Webster Groves-based MAXJAZZ Records and o… Read more (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-st-louis-names-the-best-of-maxjazz-releases/article_737f929f-9061-5871-9f5b-ec9841124d28.html)

** Jazz at the Bistro closing, reopening as $10 million jazz center (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-at-the-bistro-closing-reopening-as-million-jazz-center/article_50f806bc-010d-57a1-8a8a-19229bd15ade.html)
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http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-at-the-bistro-closing-reopening-as-million-jazz-center/article_50f806bc-010d-57a1-8a8a-19229bd15ade.html

The Ferring Jazz Bistro will kick off with an October show from Wynton Marsalis. Read more (http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/kevin-johnson/jazz-at-the-bistro-closing-reopening-as-million-jazz-center/article_50f806bc-010d-57a1-8a8a-19229bd15ade.html)

A memorial concert for Rich McDonnell will take place May 25 at Jazz at the Bistro.

The event is at 7 p.m.

McDonnell was the founder of MAXJAZZ Records and was on the board of Jazz St. Louis.

This concert will feature headlining performances by MAXJAZZ artists Terell Stafford, Bruce Barth, Tim Warfield, and Carla Cook, joined by St. Louis’s Montez Coleman and Bob DeBoo.

Jazz St. Louis executive director said: “Rich was always such a big supporter of Jazz St. Louis, and of jazz music in general. We’re honored to be able to celebrate his life with great music and the support of the artists on his label, as well as musicians from the St. Louis scene that he knew and loved.”

Many St. Louis-based artists including Good 4 the Soul, Jesse Gannon, Cheryl Brown, Funky Butt Brass Band, the Gene Dobbs Bradford Blues Experience, the Phil Dunlap Quintet and more will be performing throughout the day, beginning at 1 p.m.

The concerts are general admission, free, and open to the public. A suggested donation of $25 can be made at the door to Jazz St. Louis in honor of Rich McDonnell.

Get more information at jazzstlouis.org (http://jazzstlouis.org/) .

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Sidney Bechet celebrated in London – Telegraph

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/worldfolkandjazz/10799401/Sidney-Bechet-celebrated-in-London.html

** Sidney Bechet celebrated in London
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Sidney Bechet in 1959

“There are not many perfect things in jazz, but Sidney Bechet playing the blues could be one of them.” So said poet Philip Larkin (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/poetryandplaybookreviews/9120763/Philip-Larkin-The-Sunday-Sessions-Philip-Larkin-Reading-His-Poetry.html) of the legendary New Orleans musician who died in 1959.

Bechet is about to be celebrated in England, starting with a concert on Sunday to mark the English edition of a memoir by the jazz man’s son.

Books of Africa is launching Daniel-Sidney Bechet’s book, Sidney Bechet (http://www.jazzscript.co.uk/books/bechetchilton.htm) : My Father on Sunday May 4 at the Hippodrome, Leicester Square, followed by a concert of Bechet’s music performed by Daniel and accompanied by a British quartet presented by Jazzmo’thology. The panel discussing the book includes BBC broadcaster Alyn Shipton, writer Howard Rye and Gary Crosby, Chairman of Dune Records.

Clarinetist and saxophonist Bechet, who is the musical hero of film directorWoody Allen (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/10196567/Woody-Allens-30-best-one-liners.html) (he named Bechet as the person he would most like to have had dinner with), lived in France for many years and worked in England with Will Marion Cook’s band the Southern Syncopators.

There are also firm plans to commemorate Bechet with a plaque in central London. Camden Council have given permission for the plaque to be erected at 27 Conway Street. Bechet, who was born in 1897, lived there in 1922 (when it was called Southampton Street), during which time he was performing at the Rector’s Club in Tottenham Court Road. The plaque has been applied for by the Nubian Jak Community Trust.

As Larkin (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/worldfolkandjazz/9188330/Philip-Larkins-Telegraph-jazz-reviews-celebrated-in-music.html) wrote in his 1954 poem For Sidney Bechet:

On me your voice falls as they say love should,
Like an enormous yes.

For details of the Sidney Bechet celebration concert, seehippodromecasino.com (http://www.hippodromecasino.com/)

Sidney Bechet – Sidney Bechet, Marchand de Poissons & Other Hits (http://www.muzu.tv/sidney-bechet/sidney-bechet-marchand-de-poissons-and-other-hits-music-video/2156676/) on MUZU.TV (http://www.muzu.tv/) .

**
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PICTURE SPECIAL: 20 GREAT NEW ORLEANS MUSICIANS (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/worldfolkandjazz/10480111/New-Orleans-20-great-musicians-from-New-Orleans.html?frame=2373868)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=b17a5ea93d) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=b17a5ea93d&e=[UNIQID])

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Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

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