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‘I will kill you if you give this song to anyone but me’: how Peggy Lee was perfect for Is That All There Is? | Music | The Guardian

‘I will kill you if you give this song to anyone but me’: how Peggy Lee was perfect for Is That All There Is? | Music | The Guardian


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https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/may/26/peggy-lee-perfect-is-that-all-there-is-coronavirus?utm_term=RWRpdG9yaWFsX1NsZWV2ZU5vdGVzLTIwMDUyOQ%3D%3D
 

‘I will kill you if you give this song to anyone but me’: how Peggy Lee was perfect for Is That All There Is?

Tue 26 May 2020 01.00 EDT

As coronavirus derails plans for a concert to celebrate the centenary of Lee’s birth, Kevin EG Perry looks back on a singer whose seductive style masked rejection and pain

 

Impossibly glamorous … Norma Deloris Egstrom, better known as Peggy Lee. Impossibly glamorous … Norma Deloris Egstrom, AKA Peggy Lee. Photograph: George Rinhart/Corbis/Getty

In September 1968, songwriting titans Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller were on the hunt for a singer for their curious new composition Is That All There Is? The song was something of a departure for the writers of Hound Dog and Jailhouse Rock. It had been inspired by Thomas Mann’s 1896 short story Disillusionment, which deals with what Leiber called “the existential hole that sits in the centre of our souls”. The fatalistic spoken-word verses describe the narrator watching their house burn down, losing their first love, and even facing death, “that final disappointment”, with sanguine grace.

The pair felt the song needed an actress to sell it so offered it to Marlene Dietrich and Barbra Streisand before thinking of Peggy Lee. After catching her show at the Copacabana in New York, they handed Lee a demo. She called them the moment she listened to it. “I will kill you if you give this song to anyone but me,” she said. “This is my song. This is the story of my life.”

It’s not surprising that Lee wasn’t Leiber and Stoller’s first thought. Best known for her smouldering 1958 version of Fever, she had spent years carefully crafting an image for herself as an impossibly glamorous blonde with a seductive purr. Is That All There Is? spoke to the woman behind that image. As a child, on two separate occasions, she really had watched her family home burn down. Her first husband had left her to raise their daughter alone. There was even a lyrical reference to clowns, one of Lee’s lifelong obsessions. She felt that she too had learned to paint on a happy face. “That song completely resonated with her,” says her granddaughter, Holly Foster Wells. “To her it was about looking at everything that’s unfolding in front of you, pulling yourself back, accepting it, and going on living. What she heard was: survivor.”

Lee, who died in 2002, was born 100 years ago on Tuesday. There had been plans to celebrate the milestone with a tribute concert at the Hollywood Bowl, with performances from Herbie Hancock, Sheryl Crow and Debbie Harry. “Unfortunately the great equaliser, Mother Nature, has put us all on notice,” laments Harry. As a child, she heard Lee for the first time on the radio show Your Hit Parade. “The timbre of her voice was exciting and mysterious against the woodwind and brass. She had a wonderfully smoky voice and a phenomenal sense of time.”

When Lee was born, in the small farming town of Jamestown, North Dakota, she was named Norma Deloris Egstrom. She was the seventh of eight children, and her childhood was an unhappy one. Her father Marvin was a station agent for the Midland Continental Railroad and an alcoholic. Her mother, Selma, died when she was four. Her father remarried, the older children left home, and for 11 years Lee bore the brunt of her stepmother’s physical and emotional abuse. Her only escape was the radio. She fell in love with big band and jazz, and did her chores to a rhythm.

 

Peggy Lee with Nat King Cole and her partner David Barbour. Peggy Lee with Nat King Cole and her partner David Barbour. Photograph: NBCUniversal/Getty

The first time Lee ever sang in public, at church, she was so paralysed with nerves she sang facing a wall. By September 1937 she had scraped together enough confidence to audition for WDAY radio in Fargo. She impressed them, but the programme’s director, Ken Kennedy, couldn’t picture “Norma Egstrom” on a marquee. On the spot, he christened her Peggy Lee. The following year she tried her luck in Hollywood. Arriving in California with $18 and her father’s railroad pass, she wound up working as a carnival barker on Balboa Island. For a time, one of the of the 20th century’s great voices could be heard bellowing: “Three for a dime! You break one, you win!”

Undeterred, Lee continued to seek opportunities to develop her style. On stage one night early in 1941 at The Doll House, a tiny celebrity haunt in Palm Springs, she found herself struggling to hear the music over the roar of conversation and clinking cocktail glasses. Rather than shout over the din, Lee softened her voice. A hush fell. It suited her. “She said she didn’t like the idea of screaming: ‘I love you’,” says Foster Wells. “For her, it should be said softly, with feeling.”

Among the audience at The Doll House was Frank Bering, who owned the Ambassador West Hotel in Chicago. He booked Lee to play their venue, the Buttery Room, which is where bandleader Benny Goodman stumbled across her while searching for a new singer. Years later, appearing on This Is Your Life, Goodman reminisced about the moment, telling Lee: “I was so impressed that I hired you on the spot.”

 

 

The 1942 hit Why Don’t You Do Right? made Lee a household name

Singing with the Benny Goodman Orchestra was a dream come true for Lee, but Goodman was a tough boss. On stage she wore a borrowed dress and sang in someone else’s key. Critics compared her unfavourably to Goodman’s previous singer, Helen Forrest, while producer John Hammond assessed her witheringly: “Miss Lee is a lady whose attractiveness occasionally makes the listener forget that she has no vocal or interpretive talent.” Devastated, Lee tried to quit. Goodman refused. Less than a year later, on 27 July 1942, they recorded Why Don’t You Do Right?, which sold 1m copies and made Peggy Lee a household name.

As her star was ascending, Lee was falling in love with the orchestra’s guitarist, David Barbour. Goodman had a strict rule forbidding his musicians from fraternising with their female singer. When Lee became pregnant the couple could no longer keep their relationship secret. After breaking the news to Goodman that they were leaving, the couple married and moved to Los Angeles where Barbour could get work as a session musician. Lee planned to retire to raise their daughter, Nicki, but found she couldn’t stop writing lyrics. “My grandfather would come home at night,” says Foster Wells, “And my grandmother would say to him: ‘Dinner isn’t ready, but the song is.’”

The couple made an ideal songwriting team. After Lee resumed her singing career they had their biggest hit in 1947 with Mañana (Is Soon Enough for Me), which spent nine weeks at No 1. Behind the scenes, however, their marriage was collapsing. Barbour, like Lee’s father, was an alcoholic. You can sense her heartbreak close to the surface in her remarkable turn in 1955’s Pete Kelly’s Blues, playing a singer debilitated by drink. Despite having little acting experience she was nominated for the best supporting actress Oscar. “Of course, she was an actress while she sang,” says Foster Wells. “It was like watching a play unfold, watching her sing one song.”

 

Peggy Lee and Danny Thomas in a poster for the 1952 film The Jazz Singer Peggy Lee and Danny Thomas in a poster for the 1952 film The Jazz Singer Photograph: Everett Collection Inc/Alamy

Lee was devastated by the breakup. Later in life she would say that her favourite song of her own was The Folks Who Live on the Hill, which is about a couple growing old together. “That was the life she longed for,” says Foster Wells. “To have a stable, wonderful, long-term relationship with someone she grew old with in the same house having children. The life she got was the opposite of that dream.”

The glamorous, sexualised image Lee created for herself was a way of masking that pain. The flirtatious sensuality of her voice, combined with her looks, gave her more of an edge than some of her contemporaries. While the squeaky-clean Doris Day was advertising Lux soap and Royal Crown cola, Lee was the face of Chesterfield cigarettes and Rheingold beer. A press release from the early 50s breathlessly claimed: “Peggy puts more sex into a song than most girls could into a striptease.”

It wasn’t all raunch. Lee was delighted when Walt Disney invited her to collaborate with big band leader Sonny Burke on the soundtrack to 1955’s Lady and the Tramp. As well as writing and singing, Lee voices four characters including Peg, the Pekingese with a tail like a feather boa who vamps her way through He’s a Tramp. That was how the burlesque performer Dita Von Teese discovered Lee, though it was her image that later had an impression on her. “She was stylish throughout her life. Quietly cool and chic, confident and powerful. I think she’s extraordinary, not just for her talent in singing, but as a creator, a lyricist who clearly had high intelligence.”

 

New decade, new image … Peggy Lee in the 1970s. New decade, new image … Peggy Lee in the 1970s. Photograph: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Lee had no qualms about rewriting songs to better suit the character of “Miss Peggy Lee”. When she recorded Fever she added her own verses with allusions to Romeo and Juliet and Captain Smith and Pocahontas. By some margin her most popular song in the Spotify era, with more than 50m plays, it continues to accrue new fans: teenage Grammy winner Billie Eilish credits it with making her interested in older music. “She’s definitely had influence on my music,” says Eilish. “I wish I was as elegant as her when she performed. Her delivery and the way she sang and moved has been really inspiring to me.”

Lee’s influence has been felt by young musicians for more than a half a century. The Beatles covered Till There Was You in 1963 because Paul McCartney had heard Lee do it on 1960’s Latin ala Lee! Although Lee was initially concerned by the sudden eruption of rock’n’roll, in the end she quipped: “You can’t beat the Beatles, you join ’em.” She recorded versions of Something and A Hard Day’s Night. On a visit to London, she invited Paul and Linda McCartney to dinner at the Dorchester Hotel and McCartney announced he’d written the jazz ballad Let’s Love for her. “They said that instead of bringing her wine or flowers,” says Foster Well, “they brought her a song.”

The young songwriter Randy Newman also caught Lee’s ear – he was brought in at her request to play piano and arrange the orchestra for her recording of Is That All There Is? He remembers Lee being subdued in the studio. “She does it in sort of an almost cheerful, ironic manner,” he says. “I had no inkling that it would be a hit record.”

 

Platinum wig and rhinestones … Peggy Leein 1995. Platinum wig and rhinestones … Peggy Lee 
in 1995. Photograph: Darlene Hammond/Getty Images

The strange, melancholy song was indeed a hit, although it would be Lee’s last. She continued to perform into the 1990s, often in a wheelchair. “Ageing in the public eye was hard for her,” says Foster Wells. “She would say: ‘You try singing Fever when you’re in your 70s.’ She was constantly trying to recreate her look. As she got older she changed to a platinum wig and glasses, and made it a little more campy.” Lee released her final album Moments Like This in 1993 and died of a heart attack on 21 January 2002, at the age of 81.

Even amid the immense collection of music that Lee left behind, Is That All There Is? stands out. In the years since Lee’s recording it has been covered by artists as diverse as Chaka Khan, PJ Harvey and Cristina, whose 1980 no wave version was suppressed by Leiber and Stoller when they learned she’d added lyrics referencing Quaaludes and a violent relationship. “It wasn’t a parody; I was quite serious,” Cristina told the Boston Globe. “In fact, when I was asked to punk out the song itself, I said I wouldn’t. It was too good for that.”

It was more than just the lyrical coincidences that made Lee refer to Is That All There Is? as the story of her life. It is a song about the stripping away of illusions, performed by a woman who knew the power of them. She took all the pain of her childhood, and of losing the family she longed for, and remade herself as the superstar Miss Peggy Lee, a fragile heart sheltered behind sequinned armour.

• Ultimate Peggy Lee is available digitally now and on CD and vinyl from 19 June.

America faces an epic choice …

… in the coming year, and the results will define the country for a generation. These are perilous times. Over the last three years, much of what the Guardian holds dear has been threatened – democracy, civility, truth. 

Science and reason are in a battle with conjecture and instinct to determine public policy in this time of a pandemic. Partisanship and economic interests are playing their part, too. Meanwhile, misinformation and falsehoods are routine. At a time like this, an independent news organisation that fights for data over dogma, and fact over fake, is not just optional. It is essential.

The Guardian has been significantly impacted by the pandemic. Like many other news organisations, we are facing an unprecedented collapse in advertising revenues. We rely to an ever greater extent on our readers, both for the moral force to continue doing journalism at a time like this and for the financial strength to facilitate that reporting.

You’ve read more than 8 articles in the last six months. We believe every one of us deserves equal access to fact-based news and analysis. We’ve decided to keep Guardian journalism free for all readers, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. This is made possible thanks to the support we receive from readers across America in all 50 states.

As our business model comes under even greater pressure, we’d love your help so that we can carry on our essential work. Support the Guardian from as little as $1 – it only takes a minute. Thank you.

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Pioneering bass player for the Comets passes away | Local News | pottsmerc.com

Pioneering bass player for the Comets passes away | Local News | pottsmerc.com


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https://www.pottsmerc.com/news/local/pioneering-bass-player-for-the-comets-passes-away/article_bc9f9788-fb6b-56cf-9c67-20cb5974bca1.html

Pioneering bass player for the Comets passes away

WEST NORRITON — As a member of the aptly named Comets, bassist Al Rex supplied the pioneering rockabilly punch and the visual acrobatics that helped launch Billy Haley & His Comets into the rock ‘n’ roll stratosphere in the mid ’50s.

By 1962, when his son was born, Rex was going by his real name, Albert Piccirilli, and had left a brief but promising solo career, as well as his days as a Comet, behind him.

“He retired before I was born. I think he stopped playing in 1960,” Greg Piccirilli said of his dad, who had passed away at his Jeffersonville home on Sunday at age 91.

Although the Norristown native had left his music renown for a solid job with Alan Wood Steel, raising his family in the Black Horse section of Plymouth Township, he talked about that history-making era often with his son, Piccirelli recalled.

“He was with Bill Haley when he had the Saddlemen in the late 40s. Bill Haley became Bill Haley and the Comets in the early ‘50s when my dad was out on his own, but he rejoined Bill in 1955 when they started having some success and did some movies.”

Al Rex shared the spotlight with Haley and the Comets in the groundbreaking box office smashes “Rock Around the Clock” and “Don’t Knock the Rock” in 1956. His athletic bass playing was featured on the hits “Rocket 88,” “Shake, Rattle and Roll” and “See You Later, Alligator” with Haley and the Comets.

“Over the years he would talk about it all the time. My older brother and sisters say they remember seeing dad on the Ed Sullivan Show and the Arthur Godfrey Show,” Piccirilli noted. “I think the thing why my dad was so influential was his great talent at playing the bass, which acts like two instruments. You hear the bass and you also hearing a slapping, which is almost like a drum, a tap. So his talent was there and there were the things he would do with the bass. He would stand up on the bass. He would lay it on its back, on its side. He was real acrobatic with it. And in those days kids went crazy for that stuff. Years later, people like Jimi Hendrix would play guitar behind his back. Well, that’s influenced partly by my dad.”

Piccirilli’s siblings include Billy, Debbie, Valerie, Beverly, Lorraine, Mindy, Lisa and Christopher

Piccirilli said the fading popularity of the rockabilly style played a role in his dad’s retirement.

“I think the band’s popularity started to decline and they were bigger over in England. And by the time my sister was born in 1961, he had seven kids and felt he had to stay home and get a job. The lifestyle of traveling all the time was getting to him. And I don’t think the money was there for rock stars like it is today. Those guys back then had to work hard to make any money. They weren’t flying jets all around. When my dad started they were loading up old trucks with their gear and hitting all these clubs in Jersey and driving to New York for recording sessions. It was a hard road for all those guys who paved the way for rock and roll today. When he left music, I think my dad saw the writing on the wall with all the competition coming up, that they were kind of old news by then.”

Al spoke of the time an up-and-coming Elvis Presley opened the show for Haley and the Comets.

“Elvis opened for Bill Haley and the Comets in Cleveland and my dad met Elvis backstage. He said Elvis was nervous playing his first concert in the North and didn’t know how all these ‘Yankees’ were going to like him. I think that would have been 1956.

“When you look at the history, I think Bill Haley and the Comets were the first rock and roll band, bar none,”  Piccirilli added. “I think Bill Haley got it started for everybody else to follow him. And they added their own touches to it, like Chuck Berry with his awesome guitar playing, and Elvis Presley … everybody added a little something of their own.”

One of Piccirilli’s most vivid memories was when he attended with his dad the Comets’ induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012.

“It was an amazing night. There was a special committee  designated by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to get the bands whose leaders had already been inducted, to get the bands in there too. Buddy Holly was already in the Hall of Fame, but his band the Crickets weren’t.  Bill Haley was in the Hall of Fame but nobody ever mentioned the Comets. So that night, it was the Comets, the Crickets, the Miracles (of Smokey Robinson fame) and some others. It was a really good night because a lot of pioneers in rock were there to get the recognition they deserved.  My dad felt so honored. I remember the rock stars that I looked up to coming over to my dad, saying what an honor it was to meet him.”

Slash from Guns ‘N Roses and Kid Rock were among the admirers who came up to Al, Piccirilli remembered.

“My Dad was really happy that night. I’m glad he lived to see it.”

Al’s wife Mary had passed away in 2018.

The family is planning a private memorial on his birthday, July 13.

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Alice Coltrane Black Journal segment | National Museum of African American History and Culture

Alice Coltrane Black Journal segment | National Museum of African American History and Culture


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Tip O The Hat to Mr. Joseph Banks for this link.

https://nmaahc.si.edu/object/nmaahc_2012.79.1.16.1a

The 16mm color film print is a short documentary made for a segment of National Education Television’s Black Journal television program. The segment focuses on the life of Alice Coltrane and her children in the wake of the death of her husband, famed jazz magician John Coltrane. This film was shot sometime during 1970; three years after the death of John Coltrane.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Chicago columnist: What would happen to jazz if Louis Armstrong died during the last pandemic? | Music | nola.com

Chicago columnist: What would happen to jazz if Louis Armstrong died during the last pandemic? | Music | nola.com


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https://www.nola.com/entertainment_life/music/article_d8ff344e-9dd4-11ea-85e0-93db585cfe85.html
 

Chicago columnist: What would happen to jazz if Louis Armstrong died during the last pandemic?

As we continue to confront the coronavirus pandemic, it’s worth remembering that roughly a century ago an influenza pandemic similarly wreaked havoc around the world and swept through the city that invented jazz: New Orleans.

Between Sept. 8, 1918 and March 15, 1919, the Crescent City suffered 3,362 influenza-related deaths — almost 1% of New Orleans’ population and twice the national rate, according to the Historic New Orleans Collection, a repository of data and primary-source documentation. Another analysis, from the University of Michigan, tabulates that “between October 1918 and April 1919, the city experienced a staggering 54,089 cases of influenza. Of these, 3,489 died — a case fatality rate of 6.5%, and an excess death rate of 734 per 100,000. Only Pittsburgh (806) and Philadelphia (748) — the two cities with the worst epidemics in the nation – had higher death rates.”

From a cultural standpoint, it’s a little terrifying to realize that one New Orleanian who would go on to do more than anyone to personify and popularize the fledgling art form — Louis Armstrong — was in the crosshairs of this disease. Which could lead any jazz aficionado to wonder: What would have happened to the course of music history if a teenage Louis Armstrong, who remains the face of jazz, had succumbed?

“With everybody suffering from the flu, I had to work and play the doctor to everyone in my family, as well as all my friends in the neighborhood,” Armstrong wrote in “Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans.” “If I do say so, I did a good job curing them.”

So Armstrong, who was 17 at the time and years away from the jazz breakthroughs he would achieve in Chicago in the mid-1920s, wasn’t just present during the pandemic – he was exposed to its victims at close range night and day. Had he been afflicted, the nascent art form he would help define might never have conquered the world as quickly as it did – or in the way that it did – thanks largely to him.

True, “New Orleans music” — as locals described their indigenous sound before the term “jazz” came into vogue in the 20th century’s second decade — had other progenitors before Armstrong. Cornetist Buddy Bolden, who was born in New Orleans in 1877 and died in obscurity in 1931 (after more than two decades in a mental institution), conquered the city with what was described as an unrivaled and thrilling clarion sound. When Bolden played what’s believed to have been blues-inflected, ragtime-influenced solos at the Mississippi River’s banks, it was said that people could hear him clear to the other side. Because no recording of Bolden’s work is known to have survived, his contributions are preserved only in words, not sound.

Jelly Roll Morton, Armstrong’s senior by many years, was the first to prove that the elusive, improvised, seemingly chaotic music played in New Orleans’ bordellos, saloons and street parades could be articulated on paper. His “Jelly Roll Blues,” copyrighted in 1915, forever stamped jazz as a music that was suited to Western musical notation for other musicians to read, perform and improvise on. Morton’s recordings with His Red Hot Peppers, cut in Chicago, New York and New Jersey from 1926-30, brought jazz’s harmonic and structural sophistication to unprecedented heights. And his Library of Congress interviews with Alan Lomax, recorded in 1938, not only provided detailed accounts of the birth of jazz (complete with musical examples that Morton sang and played on the piano) but gave the world an intellectual framework with which to recognize jazz as a bona fide art form – one equal in complexity and sophistication to its European classical counterpart.

But it was Armstrong who in 1920s Chicago accomplished the triple feat of becoming the biggest jazz star of the era; the most brilliant trumpeter the art form had yet known; and the architect of solos so profound and ingeniously constructed that they’re studied, analyzed and absorbed to this day. The recordings Armstrong made with his Hot Five and Hot Seven ensembles in the Roaring Twenties became sensations because of his brilliant tone, comprehensive virtuosity and stratospheric high notes, helping establish Chicago as a jazz nexus and launching Armstrong into unending fame.

Armstrong may never have topped his musical achievements of the 1920s, but he went on to attain a degree of pop-culture stardom no jazz instrumentalist-vocalist ever has matched. Appearances in Hollywood films such as “High Society” (1956), “Paris Blues” (1961), “Hello, Dolly!” (1969) and in uncounted TV shows made him that rarest brand of celebrity, one universally known by a single name: Satchmo (short for “satchel mouth”). That he continued to perform around the world until his death in 1971, at age 69, brought jazz to millions of listeners and made him the embodiment of the music forevermore.

So what would have happened if Armstrong had not survived the pandemic of 1918-19? Which musician could have offered mass audiences a comparable combination of charismatic personality, unparalleled technique, singular sound and well-documented improvisational genius? Which trumpeter could have recorded solos of equal innovation, thereby pointing the way for acolytes such as Roy Eldridge, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and generations more? Who else could have given jazz such an indelible brand, yet one that was both welcoming to the uninitiated and satisfying to the cognoscenti?

The answer, of course, is no one. Without Armstrong, jazz would have lost the figure who set an exalted standard for all who came after and propelled an entire art form into global recognition.

Which makes you wonder: Amid all the death now surrounding us, how many visionaries and geniuses are we losing, and how will that loss echo for all time?

———

Howard Reich is the Chicago Tribune’s Emmy-winning arts critic; author of six books, including “The Art of Inventing Hope: Intimate Conversations with Elie Wiesel”; and writer-producer of three documentaries.

———

©2020 Chicago Tribune

Visit the Chicago Tribune at www.chicagotribune.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Jimmy Cobb, The Pulse Of ‘Kind Of Blue,’ Dies At 91 : NPR

Jimmy Cobb, The Pulse Of ‘Kind Of Blue,’ Dies At 91 : NPR


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https://www.npr.org/2020/05/25/845814061/jimmy-cobb-the-pulse-of-kind-of-blue-dies-at-91
 

Jimmy Cobb, The Pulse Of ‘Kind Of Blue,’ Dies At 91

Natalie Weiner 
May 25, 202010:12 AM ET

Jimmy Cobb was the last surviving member of what’s often called Miles Davis’ First Great Sextet.

Gai Terrell/Redferns

Jimmy Cobb, whose subtle and steady drumming formed the pulse of some of jazz’s most beloved recordings, died at his home in Manhattan on Sunday. He was 91. 

The cause was lung cancer, says his wife, Eleana Tee Cobb.

Cobb was the last surviving member of what’s often called Miles Davis’ First Great Sextet. He held that title for almost three decades, serving as a conduit for many generations of jazz fans into the band that recorded the music’s most iconic and enduring album, Kind of Blue

It’s impossible to overstate how much his playing, which propelled that all-star group forward with delicate washes of cymbals and brush-stroked snare, contributed to Kind of Blue‘s undeniable bounce and feel. “Jimmy, you know what to do,” Davis told Cobb before the session. “Just make it sound like it’s floating.” And it does: The perfect tension between Cobb’s signature driving cymbal beat and Paul Chambers’ relaxed walking bassline makes most people’s first jazz album one that you can — or can’t help but — move to.

 

 

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Cobb’s strength was always understatement, which meant that he didn’t necessarily get the same accolades and attention as some of his peers behind the kit. But his simplicity and intuitive feel made Cobb’s grooves a seamless part of any band’s living organism, its backbone or heartbeat. 

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Along with playing on other canonical Davis albums like Sketches of Spain and In Person Friday and Saturday Nights at the Blackhawk, Cobb helped crystallize the straightforward swing that brought hard bop to its greatest heights. He and his Davis bandmates Paul Chambers and pianist Wynton Kelly continued to play together — as a trio under Kelly’s name, and as a prolific rhythm team — until Chambers’ untimely death in 1969. They collaborated with Cannonball Adderley, John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Benny Golson, Wes Montgomery, Hank Mobley, Art Pepper and Joe Henderson. 

Cobb’s willingness to play a supporting role — as well as his unmatched ability to find the beauty in the background — meant that some of his longest tenures were as an accompanist to legendary vocalists Dinah Washington and Sarah Vaughan. He often cited that experience as formative. “I guess the sensitivity probably comes from having to work with singers, because you have to really be sensitive there,” he said in an oral history by the Smithsonian, when he was named an NEA Jazz Master in 2009. “You have to listen and just be a part of what’s going on.”

Born James Wilbur Cobb on Jan. 20, 1929, Cobb had longed to be part of what was going on since his teens, when he stayed up to listen to Symphony Sid’s late-night broadcast and worked as a busboy at a lunch counter in northwest Washington, D.C. Eventually he saved up enough money to buy a drum set, and started gigging professionally soon thereafter. For him, the “why” was straightforward. “I figured it was something I’d like to do,” said Cobb, “and when I learned enough to do it, I figured that would be what I would do for the rest of my life.”

Before his 20th birthday, the young drummer, who modeled himself after Max Roach and Kenny Clarke, was already getting high-profile gigs. Cobb played with Billie Holiday during a stint in D.C., and eventually in Symphony Sid’s traveling show, where he spent a week alongside Charlie Parker and Miles Davis — making him one of the last musicians able to say that they’d played with Bird and Lady Day. 

Cobb never shied from his status as a living link to the music’s venerable past, instead emphasizing what he viewed as a lifetime of good luck. “I’ve been in the right place at the right time a lot of times,” he said. “[But today] things are more mechanical than human, than they used to be. [Students today] got some advantages, because they have videos and all that, but it’s not walking up and shaking the dude’s hand and talking about things, or asking him questions.”

His first traveling gig with saxophonist Earl Bostic quickly turned into five years with Bostic’s tourmate Dinah Washington — which also happened to be the first of 20 years of collaborations with her then-pianist, Wynton Kelly. Cobb is featured on many of Washington’s most memorable recordings, including the underrated For Those In Love, for which a very young Quincy Jones provided the arrangements.

From there, he was recruited by Cannonball Adderley to play on some of that saxophonist’s earliest records — and eventually to join Adderley in Miles’ band. Kind of Blue was recorded shortly after Cobb’s 30th birthday. He was paid scale (something like $100 for all the album’s sessions), and never received any royalties. 

Despite the tireless work required of a sideman just to make ends meet, Cobb didn’t record as a bandleader until the early 1980s. By the ’90s, he was beginning to mentor young musicians in much the same way he had been in his early days — Roy Hargrove, Christian McBride, Wallace Roney and particularly Brad Mehldau, who played in the first edition of his band Cobb’s Mob while still in Cobb’s class at the New School, were all recorded to the beat of his evergreen swing. 

“As a drummer, he makes you feel so comfortable,” guitarist Peter Bernstein — another one of Cobb’s former students — said in the liner notes for This I Dig Of You, released last year. “Like, this is what it’s supposed to feel like.”

Cobb continued to perform and teach around the globe up until the end of his life. His family — his wife, Eleana Steinberg Cobb, and two daughters Serena and Jaime, all of whom survive him — organized most of his playing and teaching as he got older. Students never stopped asking how to master that light, insistent cymbal — something he made sound so easy, yet they quickly realized couldn’t be harder. But there was no secret, according to Cobb. “The first thing is they have to love it, and stay with it,” he said.

He lived that maxim, playing perfect time in countless bands, making music that he thankfully lived long enough to learn was timeless. When people decide to start listening to jazz today, one of the first people they hear is Jimmy Cobb, floating.

Nate Chinen of WBGO contributed to this story.

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The Fall of Autumn: Live Performance Producers Are Giving Up on 2020

The Fall of Autumn: Live Performance Producers Are Giving Up on 2020


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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/24/arts/reopening-dance-music-theater-virus.html?action=click
 

The Fall of Autumn: Live Performance Producers Are Giving Up on 2020

Uncertainty about the coronavirus and the challenge of protecting audiences and artists is prompting many prominent presenters to wait till next year.

By Michael PaulsonJoshua BaroneBen Sisario and Zachary Woolfe

May 24, 2020

In the world of performing arts, the coronavirus pandemic has already sunk summer. Now it is felling fall.

Even as reopened barbershopsbeaches and bookstores herald the resumption of economic life across America, concert promoters, theater presenters, orchestras and dance companies are ripping up their 2020 calendars and hoping 2021 will mark a new beginning.

“I think 2020 is gone,” said Anna D. Shapiro, the artistic director of Chicago’s storied Steppenwolf Theater Company. “I’ll be stunned if we’re back in the theater.”

In pop music, the superstars Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber have canceled their performances this year, and there’s not much hope for other large events. “It doesn’t seem likely we are going to open in the fall,” said Jay Marciano, the chairman of AEG Presents, one of the industry’s biggest promoters.

Much of the professional theater world is following suit. Guthrie Theater, a prestigious nonprofit in Minneapolis, jolted the industry with its announcement that its next season, which was to feature 12 productions beginning in September, would be scaled back to three beginning next March.

In South Carolina, Charleston Stage is delaying its next season until January, while in Utah, Pioneer Theater Company is aiming for February, and in California, Berkeley Repertory Theater plans to start in “late winter.”

“We won’t have programming this fall,” said Chris Coleman, the artistic director of the theater company at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts. “Part of it is the uncertainty of when it’s going to be safe to gather, and part of it is economic — we’ve thought about social distancing, but it makes zero economic sense.”

 

Lincoln Center’s plaza is now vacant, but its leadership is hoping to hold outdoor performances there in the months before it becomes feasible to welcome audiences back inside. Lincoln Center’s plaza is now vacant, but its leadership is hoping to hold outdoor performances there in the months before it becomes feasible to welcome audiences back inside.Vincent Tullo for The New York Times

In the classical music and opera worlds, there is similar skepticism about reopening any time soon. “Everyone is looking to the fall with huge question marks and doubt,” said Marc A. Scorca, the president of Opera America, a trade organization. And Jesse Rosen, who leads the League of American Orchestras, said, “I sense that many are assuming the fall is not going to be the start time.”

Leading companies in dance are also focused on next year. L.A. Dance Project, led by Benjamin Millepied, is planning no further live performances this year; neither is the Mark Morris Dance Group in New York. “I am 100 percent confident that it is not happening,” said Nancy Umanoff, Mark Morris’s executive director. For many dance companies, that means giving up on lucrative holiday season performances of “The Nutcracker,” a crucial best seller that, for example, brings in 45 percent of New York City Ballet’s annual ticket sales.

The country’s biggest stages have yet to declare their plans, but they are rapidly reaching a consensus on a go-slow approach, even if they receive government permission to reopen. At their scale, it is even more difficult to protect patrons when seats are tightly packed and there are choke points at entrances, lobbies, aisles, concession stands and restrooms. Backstage quarters are typically cramped, and productions often involve intimate onstage action and aerosolized respiratory droplets. (Momma Rose’s famous exhortation in “Gypsy,” “Sing out, Louise!,” suddenly seems epidemiologically problematic.)

Henry Timms, president of Lincoln Center in New York, said he hopes for performances on the center’s sizable outdoor plaza as soon as that is allowed. But what about watching ballet, opera, symphony and theater indoors? “It’s very hard right now to see a path to anything which looks like the traditional fall season,” he said, “absent some material change, from a medical perspective, in the world at large.”

Similarly, Deborah F. Rutter, president of the Kennedy Center in Washington, said one option she is considering is inviting artists to present work in small indoor venues separated by glass from outdoor audiences. But, she said, “It’s going to be a long time before we’re back to something that looks like the new normal.”

Broadway has already canceled performances through Labor Day; industry leaders widely believe January is the earliest likely reopening date, although a handful of producers are holding out hope for squeezing in a holiday show before then, and big-name tours might try to start sooner in cities with few coronavirus cases.

One indication of how Broadway producers are thinking: two high-profile productions that had been set for Broadway this spring and summer, a bio-musical about Michael Jackson and a revival of “Plaza Suite” starring Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick, recently announced they are leapfrogging autumn and winter and planning to try again next spring.

“If we go back to work too soon, and a theater anywhere becomes a hot spot, that is going to set the whole industry back,” said Mary McColl, the executive director of Actors’ Equity Association, a labor union that has barred its members from in-person auditions, rehearsals, or performances and expects this week to outline conditions it believes must be met before reopening. “Who knows what miracle might come down the pike, but certainly I don’t think there’s going to be large theater here in New York City soon,” she said. “And it seems more likely next calendar year.”

The L.A. Dance Project is among several important dance companies that are not planning a fall season this year.Benjamin Millepied

Coachella, by far the most influential pop festival, has moved its April dates to October. Paul Tollett, the promoter behind Coachella, declined to comment about the plans for the festival, which is held in Indio, Calif. But many in the industry expect it to be delayed again.

And what about concert tours? Joe Berchtold, the president of Live Nation Entertainment, the pop industry’s dominant power, said those decisions would depend on the availability of a vaccine or testing protocols. “While we think that phenomenal strides are being made in both cases,” Mr. Berchtold said, “given the lead time involved in planning major concert tours, and the uncertainties that exist today, we don’t expect a large volume of major tours in the fall.”

Others are even less optimistic. Talent agents, who once hoped to bump their spring and summer tours to the fall, are now looking down the road a year or more. “For the artists we represent, we believe it’s safer to move to 2021,” said Rick Roskin, an agent at the Creative Artists Agency.

Cultural life, of course, will continue. Museums are reopening. Film and television production is starting, if haltingly. And many performing artists and arts organizations have pivoted to livestreaming, attempting, with varying degrees of sophistication and success, to continue both creating and connecting.

Smaller venues, particularly in regions with few coronavirus cases, are finding ways to persist. In Arkansas, the country musician Travis McCready played a giglast week in a former Masonic Hall that put only 20 percent of its 1,100 seats on sale, and live music is resuming in some bars and parking lots. In Utah, the Parker Theater is midway through a run of a coronavirus comedy in which actors perform, one by one, on raised platforms; to reduce bathroom visits, there is no intermission.

The Parker Theatre in Utah has been staging a coronavirus comedy in a theater reconfigured for social distancing — no one is allowed to sit in the taped-off seats.via Parker Theatre

“It’s going to be organizations with 50 seats or 25 seats that will be innovating,” said Molly Smith, the artistic director of Arena Stage in Washington. “That’s how we’re going to learn.”

Some sizable nonprofits are bucking the trend and gamely talking about at least attempting a summer or fall reopening, with all kinds of precautions in place.

“We think it’s important for the community to try to make it work,” said Dean R. Gladden, the managing director of Houston’s Alley Theater. And Robert Falls, the artistic director of Chicago’s Goodman Theater, said he has four shows ready to go, and that “we’re cautiously optimistic, or maybe completely optimistic” about restarting in October.

  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 20, 2020

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      Over 38 million people have filed for unemployment since March. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, data from a Federal Reserve survey released on May 14 showed, and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in people reporting symptoms of chilblains, which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another symptom of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How can I help?

      Charity Navigator, which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the American Red Cross, and World Central Kitchen has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


As venues do open, expect fewer intermissions, digital-only ticketing, and more rules about entering and exiting. “The airline industry has become adept at loading people by zones,” said Hillary J. Hart, executive director of Houston’s Theater Under the Stars. “Could you do that in a theater?”

Orchestras are discussing relying more on string players, since those musicians can perform in masks. The Washington Ballet is thinking about placing its dancers in quarantine together.

Some, like Chicago Shakespeare Theater, hope to reconfigure flexible indoor spaces. Others, in warmer climes, hope to do more work outdoors. “We’re fortunate to be in L.A., where we have better weather,” said Meghan Pressman, managing director of the Center Theater Group.

But audiences will have to play their part too. “You could have a sparkling, brand-new, disinfected event space, and if you bring a herd of noncompliant patrons into the venue, people will still get sick,” said Steven A. Adelman, vice president of the Event Safety Alliance.

Taylor Swift, shown here in 2019, has canceled all of her planned performances for the rest of this year.Kevin Winter/Getty Images for dcp

Some orchestras hope to stage socially distanced, reduced-ensemble concerts for small audiences as soon as this summer; in August, the St. Louis Symphony hopes to begin with what its chief executive, Marie-Hélène Bernard, called “very small live experiences.”

But social distancing is divisive — many organizations view it as impractical, either for economic or philosophical reasons.

“An audience that is scattered that much isn’t an audience, it’s disassociated observers,” said Michael Ritchie, the Center Theater Group artistic director.

The Metropolitan Opera, which ordinarily can hold nearly 4,000 people, says it would be able to seat an audience of 400 if it introduces social distancing, making its already delicate financial model untenable. “I can’t imagine any scenario in which performances can take place at the Met when social distancing is still a factor,” said Peter Gelb, the opera’s general manager.

And Perryn Leech, the managing director of Houston Grand Opera, said: “At some point, if you’re putting out a vastly inferior product to a few hundred people, are you, for the long-term viability of your institution, better off going away for a period of time?”

Are audiences even ready? Social scientists are in overdrive trying to determine under what conditions fans might be willing to return. There are multiple ongoing efforts to survey arts and culture audiences; initial reports find considerable wariness.

“None of us knows how soon audiences will feel ready to come back,” said Barry Edelstein, artistic director of San Diego’s Old Globe. “What happens on the first night back when some guy in Row G coughs? Do we have to escort him to an ambulance?”

With all that uncertainty, large organizations are drafting plans for a variety of scenarios, even as most of them are now focusing on resumption early next year. More optimistic: mount a show by Thanksgiving to capture at least some holiday revenue. More pessimistic: cancel the entire season and start fresh next summer.

“There’s a balancing act,” said Christopher Ashley, the artistic director at San Diego’s La Jolla Playhouse, “between trying to stay hopeful and being realistic.”

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Sgt. Hy Zaret Sounds Off With Strictly GI Soldier Songs And Parodies  Illustration – David Stone Martin | Discogs

Sgt. Hy Zaret Sounds Off With Strictly GI Soldier Songs And Parodies  Illustration – David Stone Martin | Discogs


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How jazz legend Archie Shepp, his nephew Raw Poetic and a cast of D.C. musicians teamed up for an experimental improvised album – The Washington Post

How jazz legend Archie Shepp, his nephew Raw Poetic and a cast of D.C. musicians teamed up for an experimental improvised album – The Washington Post


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How jazz legend Archie Shepp, his nephew Raw Poetic and a cast of D.C. musicians teamed up for an experimental improvised album

Natalie Weiner

Legendary saxaphonist Archie Shepp, seated, collaborated with his nephew Raw Poetic, second from left, and a team of D.C. musicians on “Ocean Bridges.”
Legendary saxaphonist Archie Shepp, seated, collaborated with his nephew Raw Poetic, second from left, and a team of D.C. musicians on “Ocean Bridges.” (Earl Davis)

When Jason Moore, the D.C. rapper and producer who works under the moniker Raw Poetic, first started writing rhymes as a teenager, he had a specific goal in mind. “I wanted to be able to rap to anything, not just a hip-hop beat,” he says, explaining that he’d work out bars atop music from Nirvana and Radiohead along with more conventional hip-hop fare.

That proved to be a much easier task, though, than rhyming along to recordings by his uncle, legendary jazz saxophonist Archie Shepp. “His stuff was very avant-garde, and challenging to the ear and mind to keep up with — but it was really important to me, just because I knew it was my blood,” says Moore, now 41. “I think it got me ready for what we just did.”

The lessons he learned from Shepp’s records were finally put to use last year, when Moore and his octogenarian uncle officially collaborated for the first time during one marathon session at Blue Room Productions in Herndon, Va. The result is “Ocean Bridges,” a fully improvised album on which Moore, Shepp and DJ/producer/drummer/vibraphonist Damu the Fudgemunk (a.k.a. Earl Davis), along with several hip-hop and jazz scene stalwarts of the D.C. region, tap into both of those genres’ more experimental sides and ultimately find a sound that isn’t fully aligned with either one.

Recording with Shepp is an opportunity that Moore, who’s spent the past two decades active as both a soloist and with live hip-hop band RPM (Restoring Poetry in Music) and duo Panacea, has been working toward essentially since he was just practicing along with Shepp’s vast, storied catalogue.

They recorded together once before, when Moore was 18 and just starting out, and it was an experience that left Moore in awe. “Like, damn — I got work to do,” he remembers thinking. “[Shepp] told me, ‘Keep working on it, keep developing your style, and one day you’ll be ready.’ So it’s been literally 20 years of me working on something, and when he’d call and ask about music I’d send it to him and he’d say, ‘Yeah, you’re getting better.’ That was his whole thing: ‘You’re getting better.’ ”

“I was just waiting for a chance,” Shepp insists. “I find Jason’s poetry quite compelling, and original — because it is poetry. They call it rap, but it’s more than that.” Unlike many of his peers, Shepp has long embraced poetry and hip-hop as an intuitive part of what he prefers to call African American music. While he was a theater major at Goddard College in Vermont, Shepp started reading E.E. Cummings and T.S. Eliot, and realized “that poetry and literature could add another dimension to my expression,” as he puts it.

Then, as an avant-gardist living in New York in the mid-1960s, Shepp fell in with a politically minded group of artists and thinkers that included Amiri Baraka (then still known as LeRoi Jones) and James Baldwin — Baraka even wrote his liner notes. Shepp’s insistence that his activism and his art are inextricably linked — “It’s always been my belief that I should say something that connects to the oppression of African Americans, of my people,” he says of his work now — lent itself to incorporating, composing and occasionally performing poetry as part of albums such as 1965’s “Fire Music” and, perhaps most memorably, 1972’s “Attica Blues,” making the subject of his dissent explicit as well as abstract.

Today, he sees how that early experimentation with poetry and music helped pave the way for hip-hop — for his nephew’s art. “The black experience in music has become something else, as much poetry as it is musical expression,” says Shepp. “I had the privilege and pleasure to work with [pioneering spoken-word group] the Last Poets while I was in France, which made me aware not only of who they are but how in my own small way I might have helped them to become who they are. Certainly I wasn’t the only one, but to listen to my nephew carrying on this expression is really inspiring to me.”

Tapping into that inheritance was important not only for Moore, but also for his longtime friend and collaborator Damu the Fudgemunk — a D.C. native who shares a name with his grandfather Earl Davis, a musician who befriended Wayne Shorter when they were serving in the Army together. He’s been sampling jazz as a beatmaker for years and listening to it for even longer thanks to his family of musicians, but had never recorded live improvisation as part of a group of instrumentalists.

“It’s kind of an escape from being a hip-hop producer, because everything is more premeditated — you’re programming things, you lose some of the spontaneous element,” says Davis, 35. Getting in the studio was a little easier thanks to the fact that most of the band, which included bassist Luke Stewart, guitarist Pat Fritz and keyboardist Aaron Gause, had already jammed together either casually or as part of any number of D.C.-area ensembles, but it was still uncharted territory.

“I was like, this dude is so far ahead of us, we just gotta follow his lead,” says Moore. “Uncle Archie, do your thing. I’m joining you on this journey.” So they had no plans, no charts, no ideas — just free-flowing improvisation that Moore and Davis edited afterward, dubbing in lyrics and some additional sounds while attempting to keep the core recording’s same spirit of spontaneity.

“Listening back, I don’t know that any of us would be able to re-create this,” Davis adds. “It even kind of gives me anxiety when I think of trying to do some live performances — how to translate it. I know it can be done but because it was just out of thin air, a very special moment was captured.”

The album is tied together by another, subtler throughline: education. The opening track, “Valuable Lesson,” features Moore conversationally recounting a moment he learned the power of silence; the rest of the album is spliced with tracks called “Professor Shepp’s Agenda,” on which the listener hears him teaching the band his composition “Une petite surprise pour mam’selle” and talking about the importance of public education, especially for underserved black youth. Moore himself teaches at Long Branch Elementary in Arlington, and is navigating coronavirus-era distance learning while he promotes the album.

Yet despite Shepp’s professorial status, both casually at the session and for 30 years at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the saxophonist insists that he didn’t come in with any specific wisdom to impart. “Music is always a collaborative experience for me, and I learn a lot, which is important,” he says. “I felt all of the guys who played had either a very original sense of expression, or they were in fact very talented players.”

Instead of being didactic, the session served as something of a mutual admiration society, in which everyone involved found something in common through the music — leading to the album’s title. “Why can’t we bridge the distance of an ocean?” says Davis. “To bridge [Moore’s] ancestry, our musical backgrounds, the generation gap — it’s pretty much a metaphor to explain that no matter the distance, we can always find a way to connect.”

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Henry Estrada: 1936-2020 – The Santa Barbara Independent

Henry Estrada: 1936-2020 – The Santa Barbara Independent


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https://www.independent.com/2020/05/22/henry-estrada-1936-2020/
 

Henry Estrada: 1936-2020

Mark M. Alvarado| Fri May 22, 2020 | 5:45pm

One thing that separates a good musician from a great one is the ability to touch listeners with an original sound. This is generally rooted in not only their skilled musicianship but stems from their spirit and ability to welcome you at the door. The tone of a beautifully played instrument comes with hours of practice and discipline. However, the genesis of that talent is born from a deeper region of the soul. It touches you and it can make you move. It can make you sing, even cry.

That touch is what came out of saxophonist Henry Estrada. It was also part DNA mixed with a profound love for jazz. As a founding member of the legendary Estrada Brothers, Henry Estrada carved out his place in the world of Latin music and has now taken that spirit and touch to a place where music greats are forever loved and remembered.

Henry Ortiz Estrada was born on July 25, 1936, in Ventura and passed on May 10, 2020, in Camarillo. Henry was raised and attended school in Oxnard with his eight brothers and two sisters. His parents, Luis and Jesusita, migrated from Chihuahua, Mexico, to raise their growing family in fertile west Ventura County. His father was an accomplished professional violinist leading his own orchestra, providing the classical music foundation that led his sons to seed decades of the best music this region of California has ever produced.

It was his oldest brother, Luis Jr., who insisted the brothers learn an instrument after returning home from World War II. Henry’s younger brother Angel got them gigging in the mid-’50s playing pop standards for neighborhood parties, high school dances, and wedding receptions. Starting out on percussion, the teenage Henry began paying close attention to jazz and bebop, wishing to switch over to saxophone, but the band of brothers insisted he keep playing percussion. Thankfully, his mother took notice and purchased his first horn, affording him the opportunity to voice his musical talent and launching a career of performances and recordings that lasted seven decades.

Photo: Courtesy

Above all, Henry was a family man with his wife, Lydia, and children Gigi, Henry Jr. (Hank), and Sergio. He built a dual career as a reputable hairstylist to support his family, while the career of the Estrada Brothers simultaneously took shape outside of the local music scene due to baby brother Ruben’s fierce musical talent as a highly skilled multi-instrumentalist. The band blended their classical Mexican upbringing with jazz and Latin rhythms, and as people in the music industry took notice, the brothers made a conscious decision to stay home and avoid the trappings of life on the road.

This was especially important for Henry, despite developing himself as a world-class musician. He chose a life of being a well-rounded person and putting family before music. He looked at life philosophically and through a lens of spirituality, understanding that being a husband and father was far more important. Family was personal and intimate, but for the public, he lived on stage as a masterful player, transmitting his tenor saxophone and flute into the hearts of fans up and down the West Coast.

From those early teenage gigs in the 1950s, up through recording sessions for the worldwide Jazz Fantasy/Milestone label in the mid-1990s, Henry and his brothers became the go-to favorites for just about any kind of performance imaginable. If East Los Angeles had Los Lobos, then Oxnard had the Estrada Brothers. By the 1980s, the Estradas were firmly devoted to Latin jazz, with Henry and Ruben front and center. Brothers Angel and Bobby had moved on, but the group was now anchored by Ruben’s prodigal teenage son Cougar on drums. Throughout the years, the Estrada Brothers shared the stage with the likes of Dave Brubeck, Stan Getz, Tito Puente, Poncho Sánchez, and Cal Tjader. They developed their own sophisticated sound built around Ruben’s stellar vibe playing and Henry’s crafted jazz licks.

If you listen back to the recording of “Ya No Me Quieres,” Henry hits you hard with his romantic tenor, as an example of the many nights spent consoling the brokenhearted with his peaceful demeanor. It is also recommended to listen to their version of “Blue Moon” and let Henry take you on a ride with his flute floating through the heavy groove that established his family as the kings of the West Coast Latin jazz sound.

Being a real musician and a responsible father and husband at the same time is no easy task. The odds are stacked up against you because one has to be almost superhuman to pull it off. You have to be dedicated to your craft, get up every morning and haul your butt to work, provide quality time for family, and still make it to the gig. Well, through the grace of God, that’s what Henry Estrada accomplished in life: 50-plus years of music and family with an extraordinary gift and talent to touch people with his soul. There’s no doubt Henry belongs in the same breath as Stan Getz and Paul Desmond as a pioneer of the West Coast Jazz sound. But his legacy is that of just being a humble cat who could play with anybody but wisely chose to make sure his family came first.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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COVID CONVERSATIONS, Volume 2: Deborah Gordon – LARRY BLUMENFELD BLU NOTES

COVID CONVERSATIONS, Volume 2: Deborah Gordon – LARRY BLUMENFELD BLU NOTES


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http://larryblumenfeld.com/index.php/2020/05/22/covid-conversations-volume-2-deborah-gordon/
 

COVID CONVERSATIONS, Volume 2: Deborah Gordon

May 22, 2020 by lblu

A decade ago, I interviewed Lorraine Gordon, the owner and proprietor of the Village Vanguard, New York City’s best and longest-running jazz venue, about the club’s 75th anniversary.

Lorraine, a forceful presence at the club and in jazz in general throughout her life, had assumed the club’s reins in 1989, after the sudden death of her husband, Max Gordon, who founded the club. Lorraine told me:

“I like the coziness of the room when it’s full, when the people seem happy and they’re at one with the artist. There’s just a certain feeling you get because it’s small enough to reach out, and back and forth between the audience and the artists. So, that’s a palpable feeling: I feel it myself when I sit in the corner, and I see everybody’s face is absolutely glued to the stage. It’s like a painting but it’s real life, every night.”

Those words have a special resonance right now—tinged with longing, two months since the club closed its doors due to the COVID-19 crisis.

The only other time I’ve experienced the Vanguard’s red double doors shut when they should be open was after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Yet even then, three nights later, Tommy Flanagan was at the club’s piano.

Deborah Gordon—Max and Lorraine’s daughter—began working at the club in 1989. She worked closely with her mother running the club until Lorraine’s death, at 95, in 2018, when she took over full time.  When Deborah spoke to me from the house in Pennsylvania she and Lorraine bought nearly 20 years ago, the club had been closed for more than two months.

I can’t believe that I can’t see you at the club right now…

Yes, it’s still a lot for me to wrap my head around.

Who was the last artist to perform at the Vanguard before you closed the doors?

[Guitarist] Peter Bernstein. He had [pianist] Sullivan Fortner, [bassist]Doug Weiss and [drummer] Joe Farnsworth in the band. We went through the Sunday, March 15th, we finished the week, and then we closed on Monday. This was before any kind of closure edict came down from the mayor or the governor. But the handwriting was on the wall.

How did it feel to have to shut down?

Let me see if I can think of some appropriate adjectives to answer that question. I remember Jed [Eisenman, the club’s longtime general manager] being so clear about it. He had no doubt, in terms of that this was happening and that we had to close the place. I didn’t get it as strongly as he did at first, or maybe I didn’t want to. But I didn’t argue with him or anything. I just said, “What do you mean a month? What are you, crazy?” I guess I knew we had to close, but I couldn’t get a sense of any time frame, and a month sounded very long. Now, look at where we are.

I know what you mean. One thing that is very different about this experience as compared to other traumas or crises is that it’s so open-ended…

It’s open-ended, and the end gets longer and longer. Also, without any leadership, you know, you’re left rudderless. There is no real sense of process or clarity. I mean, I guess we’ve gotten some from Cuomo, thank god.

Other than following 9/11, has the Vanguard been closed for any appreciable period of time?

Yes, actually, at various times the club was closed but I can’t quite figure out why. I can remember thumbing through the listings book. There didn’t seem to be any rhyme or reason. I don’t know, maybe Max didn’t have the money to pay Con Ed. The longest period was a month, I think. But that was decades ago.

When the club reopened after 9/11, what was that like for you?

[After a long pause.] We just always kind of get back up and running, following 9/11 or anything. Listen, think about what the Vanguard has been through historically in terms of events like this. The country was just coming out of Prohibition when it opened. Actually, in the original Vanguard spot on Charles Street, it was still Prohibition. It got closed. Some waitress got caught trying to sell booze to an undercover cop. You know, there’s a long list of travesties. This one seems like the sum of all of them because, as you said, there’s no real end in sight. It’s so devastating. The suffering is just so unimaginable. And we may just be at the beginning, we don’t know.

Is the Vanguard’s space rented?

Yeah. We have a lease with some time left on it. We have a very good relationship with out landlord.

Did you apply for loans?

Yeah. Of course, Right away. Finally—after many weeks of paperwork and calls to my lending institution, all of a sudden, without any notice, the money finally just showed up. So that helps.

You know, I really didn’t want this to happen on my watch, that’s for sure. I’d been thinking and researching a lot lately about the history of this room, of the Vanguard. Whenever I think about everything that has passed through here, it has always seemed so interesting and so celebratory. Now, this is casting everything in a very different light. I can’t quite wrap my head around it. It’s made it difficult to think about it, maybe because there is the possibility of an end.

And that’s a new feeling, right? 

Yes, before it all always felt so endless.

This club has been a fixture throughout your life. It’s part of your family. And at some point, it became your job. That must have changed things, right?

February was the 85thanniversary of the club. I started working there in 1989, when my father died. When Lorraine died, I’d been there a long time already. And, yes, that definitely changed things. That feeling of, you know, the protective layer, of having some remove. It’s been difficult in a lot of ways to run this place, but also eye-opening and revelatory in certain ways.

Certainly, my father never thought I would work here. But I remember things he said and wrote in his book that now make much more sense to me.

Like what?

“Never say you own the place,” he used to say. “The place owns you.” I get it now. I was always free to walk away, to change my mind. I was always free not to take responsibility for certain things. You know. Now, I’m owned completely. It’s a very different feeling.

But is it also a loving sense of servitude?

Oh, sure. Of course. The place means everything to me.

One thing the Village Vanguard has meant to me is a point of continuity between a past I didn’t live and the culture I have lived for 30-plus years. And I don’t mean that just in terms of staying in business, though that alone is a big deal. I mean in terms of how the Vanguard has embraced change in the music and the culture without compromising the club’s legacy.

Yes, and a lot of what sustained it to the present you have to attribute to my mother. She was pretty adventurous in a lot of ways, and definitely in her listening. And Max was, too.

Today, I love having John Zorn one week and Barry Harris the next. Then you’re embracing everything as much as one little place can. Within the 52 weeks that you get each year, I think you try to stretch your arms around as much as you possibly can.

One of the things that really hurt in terms of all the weeks we had to cancel was the pianist Kris Davis. Her week was just coming up. It was a big thing. She had a great group. It meant something important to her, and to us.

Yes, I’ve written about that terrific album of hers, “Diatom Ribbons,” and I was curious to hear what that group, with its mixture of acoustic instruments and electronics, would sound like in the club.

Me too. We were all looking forward to that.

You know, there has been such a groundswell of interest in Kris lately, especially following that release, that her week seemed like it had the makings of a real event—and in the best possible place, in terms of a jazz event.

Those moments you’re talking about—that’s about being a particular space in that moment, and sharing that experience.

I suppose we’re all missing that feeling. Do you wonder whether we’ll recapture that feeling—that, after this crisis lifts, audiences will come back?

 It will be a long time. And, yes, I do wonder. But they will come back.

In the meantime, we are about to begin streaming music live from the club.

Wow, that’s exciting!

Yes, it’s an adventure I never planned on taking. I know that not everyone will be willing to come to the club, and of course some musicians are not in New York City and can’t or won’t travel, but we’re going to do what we can.

How will that work?

It’s going to be music, live from the Vanguard. We’ll start on June 13 and 14. Saturday should be an evening stream, I’m not sure of the time yet. But not too late, maybe 7 or 8. Sunday, we’ll do a matinee at 3. The first band will be [drummer] Billy Hart’s quartet [with pianist Ethan Iverson, bassist Ben Street and saxophonist Mark Turner].

Who will handle the streaming?

My main technical wizard is Michael Larson. He’s worked at the Vanguard for many years. At the Vanguard, everybody sort of does everything, wears multiple hats. He’s been a manager. He’s also what you’d call the plant manager. He keeps all the leaks plugged up. That man can build or fix anything. He’s literally kept the place pieced together. He moved us up a notch from using a roll of tape for everything. We couldn’t have done it without him. He purchased equipment, contracted a streaming service. When he talks to me about that, I glaze over, take a little nap. But he’s got it covered.

These streaming services have a ticket mechanism. I haven’t decided the price yet, but it will be significantly less than what it costs to come to the Vanguard. I hope to have a little bit of surrounding material so that you’re not just straight-up performance. This is new for all of us. It’s all new territory. After Billy Hart, the next one will be [pianist] Vijay Iyer.

Does this series of streamed performances have a title yet?

No. You want to make one up?

Hmm… Maybe “The Basement Tapes”?

I think that’s taken. I don’t know… It’s just “Streaming Live from the Village Vanguard,” I guess…

Wait! You should call it “Streamin’” —with the apostrophe— like “Steamin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet” 

Yeah, that sounds good, actually. Maybe we’ll use that.

Yeah, you can make it look like an LP cover. Well, this is big and welcome news. And it will mean that the Vanguard is paying musicians, bringing music to jazz fans and, I would hope, staying afloat…

Yes, all of those things. Of course, it’s just a temporary stopgap measure. But I’m warming up to it. I’m kind of getting used to it.

But we don’t want to get too used to it, right?

Right.

 

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

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Ring a Ding Rhythm 1962 It’s Trad, Dad – YouTube

Ring a Ding Rhythm 1962 It’s Trad, Dad – YouTube


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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2O1b8evO2fs

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

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On Facebook and YouTube, musicians are getting blocked or muted – The Washington Post

On Facebook and YouTube, musicians are getting blocked or muted – The Washington Post


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https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/copyright-bots-and-classical-musicians-are-fighting-online-the-bots-are-winning/2020/05/20/a11e349c-98ae-11ea-89fd-28fb313d1886_story.html?mc_cid=c0a2aa0653
 

Copyright bots and classical musicians are fighting online. The bots are winning.

Michael Andor Brodeur

An image from a Camerata Pacifica video that was blocked on Facebook for alleged copyright violations. Molly Morkoski on piano, Richard O’Neill on viola and Jose Franch-Ballester on clarinet play Mozart’s “Kegelstatt.”
An image from a Camerata Pacifica video that was blocked on Facebook for alleged copyright violations. Molly Morkoski on piano, Richard O’Neill on viola and Jose Franch-Ballester on clarinet play Mozart’s “Kegelstatt.” (Camerata Pacifica)

A few Sundays ago, Camerata Pacifica artistic director Adrian Spence, aided by his tech-savvy son Keiran, went live on Facebook to broadcast a previously recorded performance of Mozart’s Trio in E flat (K. 498), a.k.a. the “Kegelstatt” trio. At least they tried to.

The recorded performance was one of many that Spence had drawn from the Camerata’s extensive video archives. When the covid-19 crisis abruptly canceled its season, Spence launched a weekly series of rebroadcasts to fill the silence. These broadcasts, even with their modest virtual attendance of 100 or so viewers per stream, have been essential to keeping Spence’s Santa Barbara-based chamber organization engaged with its audience.

In a time of uncertainty, classical music provides a sense of permanence

That is, until that recent Sunday, when his audience started to disappear, one by one, all the way down to none.

Adrian Spence, Camerata Pacifica’s artistic director.
Adrian Spence, Camerata Pacifica’s artistic director. (Timothy Norris)

“What the hell is going on?” Spence recalls shouting to his son across the living room as the viewer count conspicuously dropped. Just minutes into the airing of the concert, Facebook issued Spence a notification that his video — an original performance of an hour-long piece composed by Mozart in 1786 — somehow contained one minute and 18 seconds of someone else’s work, in this case, “audio owned by Naxos of America.”

Spence, and presumably Mozart, would beg to differ.

“They’re blocking my use of my own content,” Spence said later in a phone interview, “which feels dystopian.”

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As covid-19 forces more and more classical musicians and organizations to shift operations to the Internet, they’re having to contend with an entirely different but equally faceless adversary: copyright bots. Or, more accurately, content identification algorithms dispatched across social media to scan content and detect illegal use of copyrighted recordings. You’ve encountered these bots in the wild if you’ve ever had a workout video or living room lip-sync blocked or muted for ambient inclusion or flagrant use of Britney or Bruce. But who owns Brahms?

These oft-overzealous algorithms are particularly fine-tuned for the job of sniffing out the sonic idiosyncrasies of pop music, having been trained on massive troves of “reference” audio files submitted by record companies and performing rights societies. But classical musicians are discovering en masse that the perceptivity of automated copyright systems falls critically short when it comes to classical music, which presents unique challenges both in terms of content and context. After all, classical music exists as a vast, endlessly revisited and repeated repertoire of public-domain works distinguishable only through nuanced variations in performance. Put simply, bots aren’t great listeners.

After the removal of his clips, Spence’s only recourse was to file a dispute with Facebook by filling out a single-field form. This was followed by six hours of fruitless chats with various Facebook representatives. It took nearly four days to clear the spurious claim, and in the interim, Facebook suspended Camerata’s access to live-streaming.

Clearing copyright claims has since become part of Spence’s new routine, casting emails into an opaque dispute system he describes as “the DMV on steroids.”

And the hits keep coming: YouTube blocked a recent live stream of a recorded Camerata performance of Carl Nielsen’s Wind Quintet, Op. 43, after it attracted a swarm of five automated copyright claims from different record companies. It’s gotten to the point where Camerata videos are prefaced by a warning screen, explaining their anticipated disappearance in advance.

Camerata Pacifica members perform in early 2020: Martin Owen on horn, William Woods on contra bassoon, Ani Aznavoorian on cello, and Judith Farmer and William Short on bassoons.
Camerata Pacifica members perform in early 2020: Martin Owen on horn, William Woods on contra bassoon, Ani Aznavoorian on cello, and Judith Farmer and William Short on bassoons. (Timothy Norris)

“I have no protection for my own produced material,” Spence says. “If you want to put a copyright claim against me, I’m happy to take the time to write back to you and say, ‘This is an erroneous claim and here’s why.’ But when you’re immediately blocking videos or streams, that’s negatively impacting our very mission in a time where this now has become mission critical.”

These systems aren’t just disrupting the relationships between classical organizations and their audiences; they’re also impacting individual musicians trying to stay musically present — and financially afloat — during the crisis.

Michael Sheppard, a Baltimore-based pianist, composer and teacher, was recently giving a Facebook Live performance of a Beethoven sonata (No. 3, Op. 2, in C) when Facebook blocked the stream, citing the detection of “2:28 of music owned by Naxos of America” — specifically a passage recorded by the French pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, whom Sheppard is not.

The takedown led Sheppard into what he describes as “a byzantine web of ridiculousness” starting with Facebook’s dispute form: “Beethoven died in 1827,” he responded. “This music is very much in the public domain. Please unblock it.”

Baltimore-based pianist, composer and teacher Michael Sheppard.
Baltimore-based pianist, composer and teacher Michael Sheppard. (Britt Olsen-Ecker)

And this wasn’t Sheppard’s first run-in with Facebook, which has blocked or muted past performances of Fauré, Chopin and Bach for being too digitally reminiscent of other performances of Faure, Chopin and Bach. Frustrated with the intrusive claim of infringement, the imposed busywork of defending himself, and the helplessness he felt trying to get these issues recognized and resolved, Sheppard took to Twitter.

“Dear @naxosrecords,” he tweeted May 9, “PLEASE stop muting portions of works whose composers have been dead for hundreds of years. It does 0% of people any good, especially musicians like myself who are trying to make a living in time of crisis. #UnmuteBeethoven.”

Two days later, Naxos tweeted back, thanking Sheppard for his request and confirming that his video had been “whitelisted.”

“There are people worse off than me whose only income is their performances,” says Sheppard, who accompanies his streams with a “virtual tip jar.” “But if it’s muted, what’s the point? Other people are doing the same thing and getting stymied by this.”

Covid-era opera is getting more intimate, accessible and experimental

The covid-19 crisis has certainly driven more classical musicians online to experiment with streaming, but the struggle between bots and Bach isn’t new. The pianist James Rhodes went viral after Sony claimed ownership of the living room performance of Bach’s First Partita that he posted to Facebook in 2018. The same year, musician and blogger Sebastian Tomczak received multiple copyright claims against a 10-hour stretch of white noise he uploaded to YouTube three years prior.

And in January 2019, students of conductor Jonathan Girard at the University of British Columbia presented a live-streamed program of orchestral works by Beethoven and Tchaikovsky that Facebook cut off and blocked midstream.

“This is a real, viable way of reaching audiences and communicating art to the world,” Girard says. “And it’s going to be blocked by copyright algorithms that don’t actually fairly look at what’s happening. That’s a serious problem for musicians that are playing music that’s in the public domain.”

It might be tempting to glance at the copyright claims and simply blame the names listed at the bottom — the seemingly aggressive record companies issuing them all. But many of those companies are as helpless against the system as the targets of their claims.

Take Naxos, the classical mother ship that represents about 2.5 million tracks and, according to senior manager of video and new media Duncan Hammons, considers copyright protection “among our chief duties per our relationship with our distributed label clients.”

“We’re at the mercy of automation in order to uphold our obligations to our clients,” Hammons says in an email. Like other record companies, Naxos relies on Facebook’s and YouTube’s content identification systems to track potential illegal use.

“Though the technology works most of the time in terms of correctly identifying instances of our clients’ content on-platform, it still generates a not-insignificant amount of mismatches that require human review to differentiate,” Hammons says. “The chances of conflicts with this amount of content are considerable. For these reasons there is always a volume of potentially erroneous auto-generated claims that unless contested, I may never be made explicitly aware.”

Hammons says that most claims contested by Facebook and YouTube users are cleared within a week of dispute, and that arrangements can be made for channel owners who are able to prove “the legitimacy of their status as a performing arts entity, [or] that their channel constitutes a low risk for abuse of the privilege.”

“We would love to work with these platforms to improve their technologies so that they are better adapted for classical music,” Hammons says, “but as the situation stands, our input on the issue is limited.”

One of Camerata Pacifica’s videos that faced a copyright claim from Naxos.

For its part, YouTube has invested more than $100 million to refine its proprietary Content ID technology, according to a company representative. And its apparatus for handling disputes — which, according to several musicians, is more robust than Facebook’s — has managed to resolve nearly all copyright issues before they escalate to legal matters. YouTube doesn’t actively mediate content disputes, but it does passively enable them.

And this week, Facebook posted updates to its music and video policies, including clarified guidelines concerning the use of music in video. It highlighted its free Sound Collection library of thousands of unrestricted tracks, and announced pending improvements to the notification system “to give people time to adjust their streams and avoid interruptions if we detect they may be approaching our limitations.”

But the finer points of those limitations remain mysterious. Facebook scans uploaded content through two systems: its own platform-tailored Rights Manager, which, according to Facebook, can be used to protect only copyrighted works, and a third-party platform called Audible Magic, which helps automatically block audiovisual uploads that match content in its database. Audible Magic advertises services that allow such social media platforms as Twitch, SoundCloud and Vimeo to “identify content in real-time with unparalleled accuracy” and “operate in ‘fire-and-forget’ mode using a simple end to end solution.”

Despite the robustness of such databases, classical performances remain sitting ducks for erroneous challenges. And in general, the “solutions” to these growing problems seem more tailored to rights holders than to, say, pianists. Lowly disputers are left to fight their own battles, whether they started them or not.

“There is no good solution right now,” says Meredith Rose of the D.C.-based intellectual property advocacy group Public Knowledge. “Maybe in another couple of years they’ll get the technology to the point where it can actually distinguish between two recordings of Beethoven’s Fifth or whatever. But they’re not there yet.”

Likewise, the faith that platforms and record companies invest in these technologies may be as flawed as the systems themselves.

“We built these systems around the presumption that everybody is either: A, a pirate, or B, should be a copyright expert,” Rose says.

As it stands, the relationship between classical musicians and copyright bots is a study in contradictions, as newborn technologies police music that has been with us for centuries and individual musicians battle back against the indifference of massive corporations.

But this unhealthy dynamic also presents a consequential conundrum in terms of how the arts engage with social media as they grow more and more dependent on each other.

“These [classical] organizations have been cultivating large audiences through these social media sites,” notes Girard, the conductor, “and now they effectively can’t access those audiences with their most prized content.

“Considering everything that’s going on, it just seems like just yet another thing that’s marginalizing artists’ ability to communicate with the world.”

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Free Discography Downloads from Dick Spottswood, Allan Sutton, William R. Bryant, George Blacker, Brian Rust, The Record Research Associates

Free Discography Downloads from Dick Spottswood, Allan Sutton, William R. Bryant, George Blacker, Brian Rust, The Record Research Associates


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Free Discography Downloads from John Bolig, Dick Spottswood, Allan Sutton, William R. Bryant, George Blacker, Brian Rust, The Record Research Associates & Others

 
The Mainspring Press Free Online Reference Library

Downloadable Discographies and Other Resources for
Collectors of Historic Sound Recordings

These downloads are provided free of charge, courtesy of the authors and their publishers, who retain exclusive copyright and publication rights as noted. The files may be downloaded for personal, non-commercial use only (those that are disabled for printing can still be downloaded and viewed on-screen).

.

Any sale, alteration (including e-book or online database conversion), or unauthorized duplication or distribution of this material, in any form and by any method (print, digital, or otherwise), whether or not for monetary gain, are prohibited and will be addressed under applicable civil and/or criminal statutes.

Be sure to honor our terms of use, so that we may continue to offer these free publications. By downloading, you signify your understanding and acceptance of these terms.

Please contact Mainspring Press for information concerning the licensing, reproduction, or other use of this material in excess of what is permitted under customary fair-use standards.

Newest Additions:

.

.

RAGTIME ON RECORDS (1894 – 1950)
The Worldwide Discography of
Cakewalks, Rags, and Novelties
on Cylinders and 78s

Allan Sutton

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~30 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.

Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

KEEN-O-PHONE, REX, AND IMPERIAL RECORDS
The Complete Discography (1912 – 1918)
George Blacker
Edited and Annotated by Sutton
.

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.

Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

THE VICTOR DISCOGRAPHY: BLUE, GREEN,
AND PURPLE LABELS (1910–1926)
John R. Bolog
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~2 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

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Publication © 2020 by John R. Bolig.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

..

GEMS: THE VICTOR LIGHT OPERA COMPANY
DISCOGRAPHY (1909–1930)
.John R. Bolig
.

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(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

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Publication © 2020 by John R. Bolig.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

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U-S EVERLASTING CYLINDERS
Complete Issues (1910 – 1913)

New Revised Edition

Allan Sutton

Data Compiled by William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

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Publication © 2020 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

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INDESTRUCTIBLE CYLINDERS
Complete U.S. and British Issues (1907 – 1921)

New Revised Edition.

Allan Sutton

Data Compiled by William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

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Publication © 2020 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

AJAX RECORDS: THE COMPLETE
DISCOGRAPHY
William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~0.5 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

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Publication © 2020 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

..

COLUMBIA, GRAPHOPHONE GRAND,
AND BUSY BEE CYLINDERS

American Catalog Listings (1896 – 1909)
Compiled by Allan Sutton
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use)

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Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

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THE VOCALION DISCOGRAPHY
Part 1: 14000 Series
New Revised Edition
ALLAN SUTTON
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~2 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

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Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________.

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THE COLUMBIA ETHNIC SERIES
DISCOGRAPHIES.

Dick Spottswood

 

“C” SERIES: Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~9 mb)

“E” SERIES: Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~10 mb)
(Updated May 2020)

(Free for Personal Use)

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Publications © 2016 and 2020 by Richard K. Spottswood.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

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JAZZ AND RAGTIME RECORDS (1897 – 1942)
The Complete 6th (and Final) Edition
Brian Rust

.

Download Acrobat / Reader File (pdf) (~9 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.
Mainspring Press has placed this work in the public domain, but retains the exclusive worldwide publication rights, per contractual assignment by the late Brian Rust. Republication in any form, commercial or otherwise, is prohibited.

____________________________________________________

.

OKEH RECORDS:
The Vertical-Cut Issues

.

George Blacker

 

Download Acrobat / Reader File (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use)

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Publication © 2019 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

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Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

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Copyright (C) 2020 All rights reserved.

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269 State Route 94 South

Warwick, Ny 10990

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Free Discography Downloads from Dick Spottswood, Allan Sutton, William R. Bryant, George Blacker, Brian Rust, The Record Research Associates

Free Discography Downloads from Dick Spottswood, Allan Sutton, William R. Bryant, George Blacker, Brian Rust, The Record Research Associates


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https://78records.wordpress.com/free-online-discographies-columbia-e-series-spottswood-%e2%80%a2-jazz-records-1917-1934-rust/
 

Free Discography Downloads from John Bolig, Dick Spottswood, Allan Sutton, William R. Bryant, George Blacker, Brian Rust, The Record Research Associates & Others

 
The Mainspring Press Free Online Reference Library

Downloadable Discographies and Other Resources for
Collectors of Historic Sound Recordings

These downloads are provided free of charge, courtesy of the authors and their publishers, who retain exclusive copyright and publication rights as noted. The files may be downloaded for personal, non-commercial use only (those that are disabled for printing can still be downloaded and viewed on-screen).

.

Any sale, alteration (including e-book or online database conversion), or unauthorized duplication or distribution of this material, in any form and by any method (print, digital, or otherwise), whether or not for monetary gain, are prohibited and will be addressed under applicable civil and/or criminal statutes.

Be sure to honor our terms of use, so that we may continue to offer these free publications. By downloading, you signify your understanding and acceptance of these terms.

Please contact Mainspring Press for information concerning the licensing, reproduction, or other use of this material in excess of what is permitted under customary fair-use standards.

Newest Additions:

.

.

RAGTIME ON RECORDS (1894 – 1950)
The Worldwide Discography of
Cakewalks, Rags, and Novelties
on Cylinders and 78s

Allan Sutton

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~30 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.

Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

KEEN-O-PHONE, REX, AND IMPERIAL RECORDS
The Complete Discography (1912 – 1918)
George Blacker
Edited and Annotated by Sutton
.

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.

Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

THE VICTOR DISCOGRAPHY: BLUE, GREEN,
AND PURPLE LABELS (1910–1926)
John R. Bolog
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~2 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.

Publication © 2020 by John R. Bolig.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

..

GEMS: THE VICTOR LIGHT OPERA COMPANY
DISCOGRAPHY (1909–1930)
.John R. Bolig
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.

Publication © 2020 by John R. Bolig.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

U-S EVERLASTING CYLINDERS
Complete Issues (1910 – 1913)

New Revised Edition

Allan Sutton

Data Compiled by William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.
Publication © 2020 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

INDESTRUCTIBLE CYLINDERS
Complete U.S. and British Issues (1907 – 1921)

New Revised Edition.

Allan Sutton

Data Compiled by William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates

.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.
Publication © 2020 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

AJAX RECORDS: THE COMPLETE
DISCOGRAPHY
William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~0.5 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.
Publication © 2020 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

..

COLUMBIA, GRAPHOPHONE GRAND,
AND BUSY BEE CYLINDERS

American Catalog Listings (1896 – 1909)
Compiled by Allan Sutton
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use)

.
Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

THE VOCALION DISCOGRAPHY
Part 1: 14000 Series
New Revised Edition
ALLAN SUTTON
.

Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~2 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.
Publication © 2020 by Allan R. Sutton.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________.

.

THE COLUMBIA ETHNIC SERIES
DISCOGRAPHIES.

Dick Spottswood

 

“C” SERIES: Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~9 mb)

“E” SERIES: Download Acrobat / Reader file (pdf) (~10 mb)
(Updated May 2020)

(Free for Personal Use)

.

Publications © 2016 and 2020 by Richard K. Spottswood.
All rights are reserved.

____________________________________________________

.

JAZZ AND RAGTIME RECORDS (1897 – 1942)
The Complete 6th (and Final) Edition
Brian Rust

.

Download Acrobat / Reader File (pdf) (~9 mb)
(Free for Personal Use — Print-Restricted)

.
Mainspring Press has placed this work in the public domain, but retains the exclusive worldwide publication rights, per contractual assignment by the late Brian Rust. Republication in any form, commercial or otherwise, is prohibited.

____________________________________________________

.

OKEH RECORDS:
The Vertical-Cut Issues

.

George Blacker

 

Download Acrobat / Reader File (pdf) (~1 mb)
(Free for Personal Use)

.

Publication © 2019 by Mainspring Press LLC.
All rights are reserved.

.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO
 


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PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2020 All rights reserved.

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Warwick, Ny 10990

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Lucky Peterson, a Bluesman Since He Was a Boy, Dies at 55 – The New York Times

Lucky Peterson, a Bluesman Since He Was a Boy, Dies at 55 – The New York Times


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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/21/arts/music/lucky-peterson-dead.html?action=click
 

Lucky Peterson, a Bluesman Since He Was a Boy, Dies at 55

He cut a record at 5 and went on to a steady if somewhat under-the-radar career as a backing musician and solo artist.

By Neil Genzlinger

May 21, 2020
The blues musician Lucky Peterson in performance in 2001. He was known as both a guitarist and an organist as well as an evocative vocalist. Below left, Mr. Peterson recorded his first album when he was, as the title made clear, 5 years old. Below right, Mr. Peterson at a jazz festival on the French island of Corsica in 2018. He was popular in France as well as in American blues clubs. The blues musician Lucky Peterson in performance in 2001. He was known as both a guitarist and an organist as well as an evocative vocalist. Below left, Mr. Peterson recorded his first album when he was, as the title made clear, 5 years old. Below right, Mr. Peterson at a jazz festival on the French island of Corsica in 2018. He was popular in France as well as in American blues clubs.Craig Lovell/Monterey Jazz Festival

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Else Blangsted, Who Fled the Nazis and Found a Hollywood Ending, Dies at 99 – The New York Times

Else Blangsted, Who Fled the Nazis and Found a Hollywood Ending, Dies at 99 – The New York Times


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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/20/arts/else-blangsted-dead.html?action=click
 

Else Blangsted, Who Fled the Nazis and Found a Hollywood Ending, Dies at 99

A top movie music editor who worked with Dave Grusin and Michel Legrand, she was haunted by the fate of her first child.

By Richard Sandomir

May 20, 2020

 

Else Blangsted, who won acclaim as a music editor, had only three credentials when she was hired for the job: She could read music and play the piano and guitar. Else Blangsted, who won acclaim as a music editor, had only three credentials when she was hired for the job: She could read music and play the piano and guitar. Johanna Shapiro

Else Blangsted, who fled Nazi Germany as a teenager believing she had given birth to a stillborn child, then built a career as a leading music editor on Hollywood films, died on May 1 in Los Angeles. She was 99. 

Her death was confirmed by her cousin Deborah Oppenheimer, an Oscar-winning producer.

For more than 30 years Ms. Blangsted played a major part in shaping how movie music was heard, through her work on features like “The Color Purple,” “Tootsie” and “On Golden Pond.”

She broke down film scripts to show composers precisely where to place parts of their scores, in dialogue or action, and for exactly how long. She was the composers’ representative throughout the recording sessions.

“The information that came from her was crucial,” Dave Grusin, the Oscar-winning composer who was Ms. Blangsted’s collaborator on “Tootsie” and many other films, said in a phone interview. “I knew what I was doing was working if she said I was on the right track.”

 

Ms. Blangsted worked with Dave Grusin, the Oscar-winning composer, on “Tootsie,” which starred Dustin Hoffman, above. Ms. Blangsted worked with Dave Grusin, the Oscar-winning composer, on “Tootsie,” which starred Dustin Hoffman, above. Columbia Pictures

But music editing is an unsung profession. Music editors do not receive Academy Awards, as film and sound editors do. When Mr. Grusin won an Oscar for his score for “The Milagro Beanfield War” (1988), Ms. Blangsted, his editor on the film, went unrecognized.

Her only major industry honor was the 2006 life achievement award from the Motion Picture Sound Editors, an industry group. In written remarks read at the ceremony, Robert Redford, who directed two of the films Ms. Blangsted worked on, “Milagro” and “Ordinary People,” said she had “the mind of an artist and the soul of a saint.”

But even as Ms. Blangsted had established her reputation as a creative and outspoken partner to composers, the story of her child was about to enter a new chapter.

Else Siegel was born on May 22, 1920, in Würzburg, Germany. Her father, Siegmund, was a horse trader, and her mother, Lilly (Oppenheimer) Siegel, was a homemaker, with whom Else had a difficult relationship. In a profile in The New Yorker in 1988, she said her mother had subjected her to “a life of misdemeanors, punishments and a lack of forgiveness.”

When she was 15, she began dating Eric Seelig, then, 24, and soon after became pregnant. She told no one. With the Nuremberg Laws restricting where Jews like her could attend school, her family sent her to a Jewish boarding school in Switzerland. It was September 1936.

By January 1937, when she was seven months pregnant, the tightness of her corset was causing her to faint. Desperate and ashamed, she tried to kill herself by lying on a snowy hill near the school, hoping to freeze to death.

She was found hours later, her lower legs frostbitten. Her secret was out.

She went into labor in early March. “They used chloroform in those days, and I passed out and came to and I must have said, ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’ and they put the mask back on,” she said in an interview for a documentary about her, “Looking for Else” (2007).

Ms. Blangsted, in an undated family photo. via Deborah Oppenheimer

“Later, I demanded: ‘Where is the baby? I need somebody to take the milk.’”

“There is no baby,” a nurse told her. “The baby is dead.”

Else thought she had killed her baby by keeping the corset too tight. But her family, who was ashamed of her behavior and fearful of Nazi repression, lied to her and sent the baby girl to a nursery, where a German-Swiss couple adopted her.

Knowing nothing of the deception, Else returned to Würzburg and in August boarded a luxury liner for New York City. After arriving alone, she headed to Los Angeles, where a sponsor family put her in touch with a local rabbi, who found her work as a maid and later as a nanny for Warner LeRoy, the son of the prolific director and producer Mervyn LeRoy. At 17, she had made her Hollywood connection.

But it was a modest tie at best. Mervyn LeRoy was married to Doris Warner, a daughter of Harry Warner, one of the founders of Warner Brothers studio, and after a year as a nanny Else eventually found work as a seamstress at Warner Brothers.

But she was lonely. She wrote to Eric, who was living in Argentina, and asked that he marry her. In 1940, they wed, and had a daughter, Erica Seelig, four years later. They later divorced.

Her jobs continued: She was a wardrobe woman, helping actresses look their best in their costumes, an actress in a small role in a Cecil B. DeMille film, “Samson and Delilah”; and a waxer, who protected film emulsions.

She was hired as a music editor at a postproduction house in 1960; her only credentials were being able to read music and play the piano and guitar. That led to work at Paramount and Columbia.

Ms. Blangsted also worked on “Goin’ South,” the 1978 comic western starring and directed by Jack Nicholson, above. Paramount Pictures

Her reputation was building. “Her importance to me was not only her portfolio, but her charisma, her sense of authority, her humility and her survivalism,” said Van Dyke Parks, the musician and composer who co-wrote the music for the 1978 comic western “Goin’ South,” starring and directed by Jack Nicholson. Ms. Blangsted did the music editing for the film.

By the mid-1980s her credits included “The Great Santini” (whose music was composed by Elmer Bernstein), “A Soldier’s Story” (Herbie Hancock), “Six Weeks” (Dudley Moore), and “Absence of Malice” and “ … And Justice for All” (both Mr. Grusin).

Then one day in 1984, she got a call from an aunt who had read an ad in Aufbau, a journal for German-speaking Jews. Her daughter was not only alive, but also wanted to meet her, the aunt said. The daughter went by Lily Kopitopoulos, was 47 and living in Switzerland.

Ms. Blangsted tracked down her number and called.

“This is your Mama,” she said, according to The New Yorker. “Forgive me. The nurse told me you were dead.”

When they finally met, “it was the end of drama, the end of shame, the end of accusations, the end of migraines,” Ms. Blangsted said in “Looking for Else.”

Their reunion included trips to each other’s homes and several years in which Ms. Blangsted moved to Switzerland to be near Ms. Kopitopoulos. They drifted apart after about 20 years, during which one of Ms. Kopitopoulos’s sons, Sandy, directed “Looking for Else,” with Daniel Maurer.

In addition to her daughters and grandson, Ms. Blangsted is survived by another grandson and two great-grandsons. She married Folmar Blangsted, the Danish-born film editor of “A Star is Born” (1954), in 1960; he died in 1982.

Ms. Blangsted, a witty person known for her frequent laughter, had many actor friends, including Lee J. Cobb, Gregory Peck, James Cromwell and Mr. Moore. She met Mr. Moore, the star and composer of Six Weeks” (1982), when he was already working with a music editor. The director, Tony Bill, wanted him to meet Ms. Blangsted.

After watching the film together, she recalled in a 2011 profile of her in Patch, a local news website, “I said to him, ‘You have two-and-a-half minutes to make up your mind that I will be your music editor.’ I went away. Came back and he nodded his head, very definitely.”

They remained friends until 2002, when, as he lay dying, she called to read him Dickens over the phone.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Chai Fidelity – Yiddish Jazz Special w/ Howard Williams

Chai Fidelity – Yiddish Jazz Special w/ Howard Williams


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https://www.nts.live/shows/guests/episodes/chai-fidelity-yiddish-jazz-special-8th-november-2018
 

To celebrate the release of their compilation “Music is the most beautiful language in the World – Yiddisher Jazz in London’s East End 1920s to 1950s”, historian and broadcaster Alan Dein, and Howard Williams (Japan Blues) select 2 hours of kosher platters from ‘all over the chrain’.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Opera CD Review: Gunther Schuller’s Splendid 1970 Children’s Opera Gets Its World-Premiere Recording – The Arts Fuse

Opera CD Review: Gunther Schuller’s Splendid 1970 Children’s Opera Gets Its World-Premiere Recording – The Arts Fuse


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https://artsfuse.org/202805/opera-cd-review-gunther-schullers-splendid-1970-childrens-opera-gets-its-world-premiere-recording/
 

Opera CD Review: Gunther Schuller’s Splendid 1970 Children’s Opera Gets Its World-Premiere Recording

May 17, 2020 Leave a Comment

By Ralph P. Locke

A Grimm, but not grim, opera about a Fisherman, his Wife, their Cat, and a wish-granting Flounder.

Gunther Schuller, The Fisherman and His Wife (one-act opera)
Sondra Kelly (Wife). Steven Goldstein (Fisherman), David Kravitz (the Magic Fish), Katrina Galka (the Cat), Ethan DePuy (Gardener)
Boston Modern Orchestra Project and Odyssey Opera, cond. Gil Rose

BMOP/sound 1070 — 65 minutes
To purchase, click here.

How wonderful to encounter an opera that sounds fresh and imaginative andhas never been recorded before!

The Fisherman and His Wife, by Gunther Schuller (1925-2015), was first performed in 1970 at the Savoy Theater (known since 1980 as the Boston Opera House) by Sarah Caldwell’s intrepid and inventive Opera Company of Boston. It seems not to have been performed much since then.

Conductor Gil Rose’s two organizations, Boston Modern Orchestra Project and Odyssey Opera, came to the rescue of this work on 22 November 2015, putting on a concert performance — with limited costuming and on-stage movement, plus some visual projections—in the New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall. The performance and the recording (made two days later in Tufts University’s 300-seat Distler Hall) were made possible by grants from the Koussevitzky Music Foundation and other donors, including friends and colleagues of Schuller’s.

In time for the work’s 50th birthday, the recording has now been released by Rose on BMOP’s and Odyssey Opera’s own quasi-private label. The result is as involving and heady an experience as any I have encountered from a post-1960 opera. I would put it up there with Daniel Catán’s 2010 Il postino, which I was delighted to encounter in a staged performance by Virginia Opera in Fall 2019. For me, Fisherman is a keeper, like John Adams’s Nixon in China (1987; videos here) or, from somewhat earlier, Gottfried von Einem’s Der Besuch der alten Dame (1971; I reviewed it at OperaToday.com). Or, to mention another chamber opera that Gil Rose’s folks have brought back from obscurity, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s The Importance of Being Earnest (1962), whose accompaniment is written solely for two pianos and craftily wielded percussion. (I reviewed it here.)

The Fisherman and His Wife derives from a tale by the Brothers Grimm that Schuller learned as a child. The informative booklet contains characterful illustrations for this very tale made by Schuller’s German-born mother, probably in the 1930s, when Schuller (born in Queens) was a schoolboy. (His memoir A Life in Pursuit of Music and Beauty gives a rich sense of his formative years and early career; unfortunately it stops around 1960.)

The libretto for the opera was fashioned by the great novelist and essayist John Updike, at a time when both he and Schuller were Massachusetts residents.(Schuller, after years of service as a horn player for the American Ballet Theatre and then the Metropolitan Orchestra, was president of the New England Conservatory in 1967-77. John Updike and his family lived in Ipswich from 1957 to 1974.) A fascinating 20-minute documentary includes an interview with Schuller, plus captivating excerpts from a TV production based on the first production.

The opera was (as the printed program put it) “commissioned by the Junior League of Boston as a 60th Anniversary Gift to the Children of Boston.” The libretto is very schematic, involving much varied repetition of events and phrases, all of which makes for easy comprehension, despite the often-challenging nature of Schuller’s music.

Steven Goldstein and Katrina Galka in in the Odyssey Opera/BMOP performance of The Fisherman and His Wife. Photo: Kathy Wittman.

The basic story is that the (unnamed) Fisherman is prevailed upon by his endlessly unsatisfied Wife — we do hear her name: Ilsebill — to upgrade their simple hut. She insists that he make this demand of a magical Fish that he has caught and released. The Fish speaks, because (as it explains) it is “an enchanted prince.” Each time the Fisherman goes to the shore, the Fish grants the Wife’s current wish, and then, when the husband returns home, the Wife raises the ante. First the hut becomes a cottage; then, at her second demand, a castle; next she insists on becoming a queen, then a king, the pope, and finally God (so she can command the sun or moon to stop). This last request being too outrageous, the Fisherman and his Wife find themselves back in their simple hut — which they now appreciate more fully.

Updike clearly enjoyed playing with the folk tale, embellishing it with fanciful and highly imaged language as well as tart social commentary: “Husband, how much sweeter it would be if everything I thought became a law, and every sneeze became a holiday, and every cough a cause for national mourning.” Updike also invented an extra character: the couple’s pet Cat, who reacts visibly to all kinds of happenings on stage and occasionally also sings (as does a chorus, in a few passages as the Wife’s wishes become extreme).

Sarah Caldwell stage-directed the premiere, and Schuller conducted. She repeatedly tried to get him to simplify the elaborate stage directions, such as the cat’s extensive and no doubt distracting facial gestures, scampering, and slinky jumping. The lighting may have posed challenges as well: Updike calls for specific contrasts of color from scene to scene as the sea becomes stormy and as the anthropomorphic Fish grows menacingly large. The sets and costumes, though, were kept simple, attractive, and appropriate.

The 2015 concert performance was a far simpler affair, putting the emphasis on the music and words, rather than on theatrical illusion. This is, after all, still a folk tale, and a stripped-down presentation may suit it. For that matter, hearing the work on a CD, with the libretto in hand, may be a particularly good way to encounter this fascinating study in the sins of pride, greed, and (on the husband’s part) spinelessness.

Composer Gunther Schuller — in his score the accessible rubs shoulders with the near-arcane.

Schuller’s compositional style was often a highly idiosyncratic hodge-podge of Schoenbergian twelve-tone, Stravinskyan rhythmic dynamism, and much more. Here the accessible rubs shoulders with the near-arcane. Angular, leaping melodic lines make stiff demands on singer and listener alike. But Schuller’s deep knowledge of jazz (he wrote pathbreaking histories of early jazz and the Swing era) creeps into the orchestral accompaniment at moments, as when the Wife complains about the hut’s rotten floor and leaking roof (toward the end of track 3), during the creepily catchy duet in which Fish and Cat compare the mysteries of humans’ married life to the odd creatures living in the dark sea (end of track 8), and during the chorus’s spoken recitation of the items that the Wife obtains by becoming a king (“A floor that is one continuous emerald four feet thick”).

Best of all is Schuller’s consistent and intriguing distinction between the peppery demands of the Wife and the subdued, often lyrical replies of the poetic, long-suffering Fisherman. There are additional surprises along the way, as when an obedient Gardener appears (in the “castle” scene), or when Cat wonders if Fish can really talk, and the latter, tauntingly, meows. Kids in the audience must have enjoyed that! (Adults, too, I confess.)

Updike’s increasingly elaborate imagery turns the series of wishes (uttered, then granted) into a verbal theme-and-variations. For example, early on the Fisherman, alone by the shore and pondering the majesty of the sea, invokes images that will recur: palace, king, and, yes, God.  Similarly, Schuller brings back certain musical materials again and again. Sometimes the repetition is more or less literal: the Fisherman often moans, to an increasingly familiar melodic phrase, “It is not the right thing to do.” Other times a moment is given a fresh, expansive twist, as when the chorus elaborates on the wife’s oft-repeated line “Look what I wished with my wish!” The opera’s eventual, sudden return to simplicity brings the work to a satisfying, full-circle close.

The chamber orchestra includes a wide variety of instruments, such as a dozen strings, electric guitar, celesta, an organ (at one point playing single notes quickly and softly), and pairs of winds including saxophones. This allows for much contrast in separate and mixed timbres — all without overpowering the voices. Frequent orchestral interludes indicate time passing, echo onstage action (e.g., when the Cat reacts in surprise to some decision by the couple), or emphasize the ever-increasing scale of the Wife’s wishes. The next-to-last scene, for example, begins with hefty storm music (the Flounder is getting angry!), giving the five brass players and two percussionists a workout.

The performance here helps enormously: all five singers have well-produced voices and project the words clearly. My favorite is the tenor, Steven Goldstein, as the Fisherman, his voice sweet and firm at all moments, perfectly on pitch. Sondra Kelly’s capacious mezzo contains a touch of wobble that makes the Wife seem appropriately annoying and no longer young. The disparity between the two characters can be sensed through their vocal tone alone, as in the opera’s gentle concluding scene. Rose’s orchestra and six-person chorus perform splendidly, and the recorded sound captures everything in comfortable balance.

The cast of the 2015 Odyssey Opera/BMOP performance of The Fisherman and His Wife. Photo: Kathy Wittman.

Though Schuller and Updike would probably not have imagined this, the work is near-ideal for home listening, with the libretto (and its stage directions) in hand to help one envision the onstage action and shifts of mood. The almost century-old illustrations by Schuller’s mother — and one photo apiece from the 1970 and 2015 productions — allow one’s imagination to soar. An online video of excerpts from the 2015 performance gives a further sense of how well the work can come across in public. Yet another equally captivating video shows the work in rehearsal and includes interview excerpts with Gil Rose.

I would encourage opera companies, including college-level opera workshops, to experiment with ways to put this splendid and almost-new opera on stage, perhaps paired with some other fairy-tale stagework, such as Stravinsky’s The Nightingale or the attractive Nightingale: A New Musical, by Broadway composer Charles Strouse (based on the same Hans Christian Andersen story that Stravinsky used).

Bravo to Gil Rose and his devoted singers and players for bringing this major work out of undeserved obscurity. May its fame grow as big as a castle! (The complete recording is available on YouTube and other streaming services. The booklet that comes with the CD can also be downloaded here at no cost.)


Ralph P. Locke is emeritus professor of musicology at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music. Six of his articles have won the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award for excellence in writing about music. His most recent two books are Musical Exoticism: Images and Reflections and Music and the Exotic from the Renaissance to Mozart (both Cambridge University Press). Both are now available in paperback; the second is also available as an e-book. He contributes to American Record Guide and to the online arts-magazines NewYorkArts.netOperaToday.com, and The Boston Musical Intelligencer. His articles have appeared in major scholarly journals, in OxfordMusicOnline (Grove Dictionary), and in the program books of major opera houses, e.g., Santa Fe (New Mexico), Wexford (Ireland), Glyndebourne, Covent Garden, Bilbao, and the Bavarian State Opera (Munich).

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Exclusive First Look at New Photograph of Blues Legend Robert Johnson | Vanity Fair

Exclusive First Look at New Photograph of Blues Legend Robert Johnson | Vanity Fair


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Exclusive First Look at New Photograph of Blues Legend Robert Johnson

Even if he didn’t sell his soul at the Crossroads, the massively influential Mississippi guitarist remains shrouded in mystery. An upcoming memoir from his 94-year-old stepsister brings new depth to Johnson’s mythos—and the third verified picture of him in existence.

By Annye C. Anderson

May 20, 2020

Annye Anderson was only 12 years old when her stepbrother, Robert Johnson, died in 1938 at the age of 27. In the years that followed, she watched in dismay as the sweet-natured man she knew was transformed into an unrecognizable legend: the hard-living, hard-drinking blues singer and guitarist who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for his otherworldly talent. The only two photographs of Johnson ever published did little to dispel the mystery of the artist Eric Clapton once called “the most important blues musician who ever lived.” In one, Johnson strikes a stern pose, a cigarette dangling from his lips. In the other, taken at a Memphis photo studio, he is smiling but formal, perched cross-legged in a pinstripe suit atop a wooden stool.

But Mrs. Anderson, as she prefers to be called, kept something of her stepbrother that reveals a different side of him. The treasure was stored in a small box that had held a bottle of sewing machine oil back in the 1930s: a photograph Johnson took of himself in a nickel portrait booth in Memphis, probably at the same time as his cigarette photo. It depicts a young man of 25 or 26, full of a warmth and joy that seem against type for a bluesman, his fingers forming a chord on the neck of his guitar. Indeed, the photo is as much a portrait of the instrument as it is of the artist, the guitar lovingly framed front and center by a man for whom the music was everything. It is a selfie from another age, and perhaps the best nickel ever spent.

In an exclusive first look, the photograph is presented here as it appears on the cover of Brother Robert: Growing Up With Robert Johnson, Mrs. Anderson’s forthcoming memoir written with Preston Lauterbach, to be published by Hachette on June 9. In an excerpt from the book, Mrs. Anderson, now 94, recounts the day the photograph was taken:
Introduction by Eric Bates

There was a make-your-own-photo place on Beale Street, near Hernando Street. I’ve since learned that a man named John Henry Evans owned it. The photo place was right next door to Pee Wee’s, the bar where Mr. Handy wrote his blues. One day when I was 10 or 11 years old, I walked there with Sister Carrie and Brother Robert. I remember him carrying his guitar and strumming as we went. You just walk in, drop a nickel in the slot, pull the curtain, and do it. There was no photographer. I had my picture made. Brother Robert got in the booth, and evidently made a couple.

I kept Brother Robert’s photograph in my father’s trunk that sat in the hallway of the Comas house while we lived there with my mother after my father died. After my mother died, we could only take so many things. I took my photographs with me, wrapped in a handkerchief. I only carried a few belongings to Ma and Pops Thompson’s house. When I moved in with my sister Charlyne, I bought some furniture. I stored the photograph, along with others, in a cedar chest I bought. I’ve always had this photograph.

It shows Brother Robert the way I remember him—open, kind, and generous.He doesn’t look like the man of all the legends, the man described as a drunkard and a fighter by people who didn’t really know him. This is my Brother Robert.

From the book BROTHER ROBERT: Growing Up with Robert Johnson by Annye C. Anderson, with Preston Lauterbach. Reprinted by permission of Hachette Books, New York, NY. All rights reserved.

More Great Stories From Vanity Fair

— Prince Harry’s Quarantine Lament: The Ex-Royal Is Reportedly Feeling a Little Sad in L.A.
— Astronaut Jessica Meir Returns Home to a “Completely Different Planet”
— Can a New Book Finally Settle the Feud Rumors Between Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton?
— This Is What Swedish Chefs Learned While Keeping Their Restaurants Open in the Pandemic
— Even Stephen King Thinks We’re Living in a Stephen King Book
— A Pandemic Won’t Kill the Open Office, but Slack Could
— From the Archive: The Lonely Heir, an Inside Look at Prince Charles’s Childhood

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Exclusive First Look at New Photograph of Blues Legend Robert Johnson | Vanity Fair

Exclusive First Look at New Photograph of Blues Legend Robert Johnson | Vanity Fair


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https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2020/05/exclusive-first-look-at-new-photograph-of-blues-legend-robert-johnson?fbclid=IwAR3LShBQzL1KXRkgYh0Wlw7GspbwhtFyNcbUFzHl1s6q4S6Q0DCWGKMSkZM


 

Exclusive First Look at New Photograph of Blues Legend Robert Johnson

Even if he didn’t sell his soul at the Crossroads, the massively influential Mississippi guitarist remains shrouded in mystery. An upcoming memoir from his 94-year-old stepsister brings new depth to Johnson’s mythos—and the third verified picture of him in existence.

By Annye C. Anderson

May 20, 2020

Annye Anderson was only 12 years old when her stepbrother, Robert Johnson, died in 1938 at the age of 27. In the years that followed, she watched in dismay as the sweet-natured man she knew was transformed into an unrecognizable legend: the hard-living, hard-drinking blues singer and guitarist who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for his otherworldly talent. The only two photographs of Johnson ever published did little to dispel the mystery of the artist Eric Clapton once called “the most important blues musician who ever lived.” In one, Johnson strikes a stern pose, a cigarette dangling from his lips. In the other, taken at a Memphis photo studio, he is smiling but formal, perched cross-legged in a pinstripe suit atop a wooden stool.

But Mrs. Anderson, as she prefers to be called, kept something of her stepbrother that reveals a different side of him. The treasure was stored in a small box that had held a bottle of sewing machine oil back in the 1930s: a photograph Johnson took of himself in a nickel portrait booth in Memphis, probably at the same time as his cigarette photo. It depicts a young man of 25 or 26, full of a warmth and joy that seem against type for a bluesman, his fingers forming a chord on the neck of his guitar. Indeed, the photo is as much a portrait of the instrument as it is of the artist, the guitar lovingly framed front and center by a man for whom the music was everything. It is a selfie from another age, and perhaps the best nickel ever spent.

In an exclusive first look, the photograph is presented here as it appears on the cover of Brother Robert: Growing Up With Robert Johnson, Mrs. Anderson’s forthcoming memoir written with Preston Lauterbach, to be published by Hachette on June 9. In an excerpt from the book, Mrs. Anderson, now 94, recounts the day the photograph was taken:
Introduction by Eric Bates

There was a make-your-own-photo place on Beale Street, near Hernando Street. I’ve since learned that a man named John Henry Evans owned it. The photo place was right next door to Pee Wee’s, the bar where Mr. Handy wrote his blues. One day when I was 10 or 11 years old, I walked there with Sister Carrie and Brother Robert. I remember him carrying his guitar and strumming as we went. You just walk in, drop a nickel in the slot, pull the curtain, and do it. There was no photographer. I had my picture made. Brother Robert got in the booth, and evidently made a couple.

I kept Brother Robert’s photograph in my father’s trunk that sat in the hallway of the Comas house while we lived there with my mother after my father died. After my mother died, we could only take so many things. I took my photographs with me, wrapped in a handkerchief. I only carried a few belongings to Ma and Pops Thompson’s house. When I moved in with my sister Charlyne, I bought some furniture. I stored the photograph, along with others, in a cedar chest I bought. I’ve always had this photograph.

It shows Brother Robert the way I remember him—open, kind, and generous.He doesn’t look like the man of all the legends, the man described as a drunkard and a fighter by people who didn’t really know him. This is my Brother Robert.

From the book BROTHER ROBERT: Growing Up with Robert Johnson by Annye C. Anderson, with Preston Lauterbach. Reprinted by permission of Hachette Books, New York, NY. All rights reserved.

More Great Stories From Vanity Fair

— Prince Harry’s Quarantine Lament: The Ex-Royal Is Reportedly Feeling a Little Sad in L.A.
— Astronaut Jessica Meir Returns Home to a “Completely Different Planet”
— Can a New Book Finally Settle the Feud Rumors Between Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton?
— This Is What Swedish Chefs Learned While Keeping Their Restaurants Open in the Pandemic
— Even Stephen King Thinks We’re Living in a Stephen King Book
— A Pandemic Won’t Kill the Open Office, but Slack Could
— From the Archive: The Lonely Heir, an Inside Look at Prince Charles’s Childhood

Looking for more? Sign up for our daily newsletter and never miss a story.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Warwick, Ny 10990

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Drug dealers put up George Jones reel-to-reel recordings as bail

Drug dealers put up George Jones reel-to-reel recordings as bail


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Drug dealers put up George Jones reel-to-reel tapes as bail decades ago. Are they real?

Updated 6:55 p.m. ET May 17, 2020

For 30 years, eight boxes of reel-to-reel tapes bearing the label “George Jones albums” rested abandoned and forgotten in a bank vault in New Orleans.

Six years and a court battle spanning two states later, those same boxes now sit in a bank vault in Benton County, Tennessee.

Even now, no one knows if those tapes contain recordings at all, let alone if they are what the boxes’ label says they are: Master copies of live performances of George Jones and the Jones Boys recorded in 1966 by music producers who worked side gigs as drug dealers and used the recordings as collateral to post bail.

“I have no idea if there is anything on those tapes,” former Louisiana federal court clerk Bill Blevins told Knox News. “Will you let me know when you find out? That was one of those rare, interesting things I dealt with in my career … the George Jones’ tapes.”

George Jones gives his first public performance at the Ryman Auditorium on Aug. 27, 1999, since his near-fatal accident. (Photo: Randy Piland / The Tennessean)

Knox News has been investigating the discovery, conducting interviews and mining court records. The story that emerges has all the elements of a great country song worthy of the legend of George Jones: booze and drugs, late-night recording sessions, cheating hearts and shady deals.

Blevins didn’t know a single George Jones’ song when the newly appointed Clerk of Court for the U.S. District Court of Eastern Louisiana opened up that vault six years ago and saw the boxes.

‘What’s the deal with these tapes?’

“We had various things in storage that was being held in a safe deposit box at a local bank,” said Blevins, who went to the vault to inventory the contents as the new court clerk. “These tapes were in there. The question was, ‘What’s the deal with these tapes?’ It didn’t look like the court should have them.

“It was very puzzling as to why the court had these and that they were used as some sort of collateral,” he said. “It was a very unusual thing.”

 

 

As fate would have it, Blevins had met a fellow in his previous court post in Florida who knew the name George Jones quite well – his colleague had played with the Jones Boys.

Blevins quickly surmised from his pal that if the contents of the boxes were as described – “a very special radio thing done back in the day” – it could be worth a fortune.

“Where did it come from?” he puzzled. “Why is it here?”

He and court clerk Carol L. Michel set out to solve the mystery. Their first clue was written on the label: Case number 2:83-cr-541 USA vs David L. Snoddy and Donald E. Gilbreth.

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Drug-dealing record producers

Snoddy and Gilbreth were partners in the music business and the drug trade, court records show. In 1983, federal agents in Louisiana came calling with handcuffs and a drug-trafficking indictment.

A judge offered freedom pending trial, but only if the pair could come up with a combined $1 million in bail. They didn’t have the cash, but Gilbreth told the court he had something even better: master recordings of a country music legend.

“Gilbreth does hereby pledge … master tapes of recordings of George Jones,” a court minute entry from 1984 shows.

The government’s exhibit list in U.S. vs. Snoddy et al includes reference to ‘the tapes’ (Photo: U.S. District Court)

Gilbreth claimed another music business partner, Jimmy Klein, partnered with him to produce the master recordings of Jones’ live performances in 1966 at Nugget Studios in Goodlettsville, Tennessee.

Jones was a hit-maker by then but broke just the same, struggling with alcoholism and addiction.

It’s not clear from the court record if Jones gave Gilbreth and Klein rights to the recordings, sold rights to them or traded them for drugs. Klein insisted in a 1982 affidavit that Jones – dubbed “No Show Jones” during his turbulent drinking years – surrendered all rights to him and Gilbreth but didn’t explain.

Gilbreth claimed the five reel-to-reel tapes he offered the court as collateral contained 35 songs performed live by Jones and his band and – in 1984 – were valued at $1.2 million.

“You need to keep in mind that these albums will continue to grow in worth because of the legend of George Jones,” an appraiser wrote on Gilbreth’s behalf. “As time goes on, he will not be recording forever but the legend lives on.”

The late U.S. Magistrate Ronald A. Fonseca took Gilbreth at his word. He didn’t even listen to the tapes, according to a handwritten note on the bond order.

“The above exhibits were not played by the undersigned magistrate and the … songs contained on said tapes were not verified,” the note says.

The front page of the April 27, 2013 of The Tennessean for the coverage of the death of George Jones. (Photo: The Tennessean)

The tapes were boxed up, labeled and sent to the bank vault. Gilbreth and Snoddy were convicted in 1986 and ordered to prison. The presiding judge canceled their bond and ordered the tapes returned to Gilbreth.

A document in the court file says Gilbreth’s attorney, Michael Fawer, went to the vault in 1986 with a court clerk and retrieved the tapes. He even signed for them.

But when Blevins walked into the vault 28 years later, the tapes were still there.

‘They weren’t our tapes’

“They weren’t our tapes,” Blevins said. “The court had released them … We didn’t listen to them. I have no idea if there is anything on those tapes.”

Fawer has acknowledged in court records he didn’t take possession of the tapes but it’s not clear why. He has since claimed in court records he lied back in 1984 when he told Fenseca that Gilbreth was the sole owner of the tapes. He now insists Snoddy was a co-owner.

Louisiana attorney Michael Fawer is shown in an undated photograph. (Photo: submitted)

At the time Blevins’ discovered of the tapes, Gilbreth was dead, and Snoddy was still in prison. Louisiana U.S. District Judge Kurt Kurt Engelhardt appointed attorney Gregory Grimsal to locate Gilbreth’s heirs.

Grimsal would spend months searching. He found a brother in Big Sandy, Tennessee.; a widow at a bowling alley in Florence, Ala.; an obituary for another widow in Muscle Shoals, Ala.; and a stepson in Florence, Ala. Gilbreth’s brother said Gilbreth likely had biological children but never supported them.

Grimsal wound up running legal notices in a series of newspapers in Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee. He didn’t mention the tapes. Instead, he wrote that the federal court in Lousiana was in search of heirs to claim “collateral” that had been abandoned in a criminal case involving Gilbreth and Snoddy.

Then, he waited.

George Jones Memorial Church stands at dusk in Oak Ridge on Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017. People claim this site is haunted, and it is one of the many local legends the city has.  (Photo: CAITIE MCMEKIN/NEWS SENTINEL)

Weeks later, William Yuille called him. Yuille said his mother was married to Gilbreth when Gilbreth went to prison and had been a “law-abiding, faithful” wife before he ditched her in 1994 for another woman.

Yuille’s mother was now dead, but Yuille insisted he could remember his mother and Gilbreth discussing the tapes.

“Gilbreth possibly had drug-induced memory … issues but for whatever reason he failed to remember what he had done with the tapes,” Yuille wrote in an affidavit.

Yuille insisted he should be awarded the tapes. But the woman Gilbreth left Yuille’s mother to marry – Jean Collett – had other ideas, as did Snoddy, newly released from prison.

Collett would later tell a judge Gilbreth died without a will. The house was in her name, and Gilbreth was largely broke, so she never sought appointment as the administrator of his estate. She told Engelhardt in 2017 that she planned to file the necessary paperwork but never did.

Snoddy wasn’t so hesitant. He filed probate action in Benton County, Tennessee – where Gilbreth died – to try to win custody of the tapes. Yuille filed a probate claim, too, though his claim was later dismissed. Attorney Dwayne Maddox was appointed by the probate court to handle the case.

In mid-2018, Louisiana Judge Engelhardt washed his hands of the matter, ordering the tapes turned over to Maddox for safekeeping.

Tapes in a back seat

George Jones, left, and Tammy Wynette announce their new MCA album and companying tour together at Scene Three in Nashville April 18, 1995. (Photo: Rick Musacchio / The Tennessean)

Maddox and his wife headed to New Orleans and met a host of court officials at the bank vault, records show. Maddox showed his identification, signed a form and walked out with the boxes.

“We had no idea if we had a million dollars worth of tapes in our back seat,” Maddox told Knox News.

So, he and his wife decided to pay a visit to the George Jones Museum in Nashville on the way back to Benton County.

“There was a box that looked just like these reel-to-reel tapes in the museum,” he said.

Maddox ultimately locked the tapes away in a bank vault near his office. They remain there today. A Tennessee appellate court issued a ruling earlier this month that paves the way for Snoddy to assert his claim of one-half interest in the tapes.

Maddox said he thinks Gilbreth was married when he died, and had children by another woman, but he doesn’t have anyone asserting a claim to the tapes. The case is currently on hold because of the COVID-19 shutdown of in-person hearings in Tennessee.

“More than likely, (the court ruling is) going to be the end of it,” Maddox said. “I represent unknown heirs. I don’t have any clients at this point.”

Snoddy’s attorney didn’t return a phone message.

Patty Loveless comforts a tearful Vince Gill as they sing his “Go Rest High on That Mountain” during the May 2, 2013, memorial service for George Jones at the Grand Ole Opry House. (Photo: Larry McCormack /The Tennessean)

“We don’t know if there’s anything on those tapes or not,” Maddox said. “It could be a hoax or a fraud. They could be damaged. We just don’t know. But they were appraised at over $1 million in 1984, so if they are real, I can’t imagine the value.”

George Jones, of course, died in 2013, just weeks after a performance at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum as part of his farewell tour.

Email Jamie Satterfield at jamie.satterfield@knoxnews.com and follow her on Twitter @jamiescoop. If you enjoy Jamie’s coverage, support strong local journalism by subscribing for full access to all our content on every platform.

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East End Yiddisher Jazz | Spitalfields Life

East End Yiddisher Jazz | Spitalfields Life


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https://spitalfieldslife.com/2018/10/09/east-end-yiddisher-jazz/
 

East End Yiddisher Jazz

October 9, 2018

Broadcaster Alan Dein introduces a new compilation of East End Yiddisher Jazz that he has uncovered, reclaiming a charismatic lost musical world from undeserved obscurity

Dancing in the street in Whitechapel

“Music is the Most Beautiful Language in the World!” proclaimed Weinberg’s Brick Lane gramophone shop in an advert published in a Yiddish paper sold on the streets of Whitechapel in the twenties. This was the time when swinging dance bands were all the rage, and local venues like St George’s Town Hall, the Grand Palais and the King’s Hall proudly hosted ‘Jazz dances’ complete with live bands and fox trot competitions. At Levy’s record shop, 19 & 20 Whitechapel High St, which was known both locally and far and wide as ‘the Home of Music’, customers could find the latest red hot jazz imports, and even discs pressed up on Levy’s very own record labels, Levaphone and Oriole.

This was a musical landscape in which generations of gifted young Jewish Eastenders – musicians, singers, song writers as well as impresarios, club and record shop owners – forged a remarkable contribution to the development of the British music scene. Take Bud Flanagan, Joe Loss, Stanley Black, Ronnie Scott, Alma Cogan, Lionel Bart and Georgia Brown to name but a few.

Their recorded legacy can easily be found online. Yet surprisingly, given the cultural and religious backdrop, Jewish-themed jazz and dance band discs, or folk or musical comedy numbers recorded in London during this time have proved far more elusive. There is no problem in finding their equivalent in the United States, or even Jewish dance band music from pre-Nazi era Germany or Poland.  So my quest has been to seek out and rescue the ‘Yiddisher Jazz’ soundtrack of the old Jewish East End from apparent aural oblivion.

What treasures they are! Thanks to a squad of supporters and fellow travellers, I have traced a series of remarkable 78 rpm discs in the archives of the British Library and the Jewish Museum, as well as in private collections, and via the charity shops of Hendon and Golders Green.  These were districts where former East Enders moved in the last century and where – sadly after they have gone – some of their possessions end up for sale. Yet even after all these years, these recordings are still very much alive. Magically, they have preserved an atmosphere of a past world – mirroring the old Yiddish Theatre where audiences left with smiles on their faces and tears in their eyes.

We can delight in the cheeky street patter of the incomparable slapstick drummer Max Bacon rejoicing in the East Enders love affair with ‘Beigels’ – but also shed a tear with Leo Fuld, the remarkable Dutch Yiddish singer, whose recordings in post-war London were haunting reminders of a way of life decimated by the Holocaust.

Local haunts like Petticoat Lane market are mentioned regularly in these recordings, and in 1929 Mendel & His Mishpoche Band offered lyrics sung in Yiddish to a pounding fox trot: the women rush to get bargains, a chicken with schmaltz, a new sock, a bit of chrain, soup, a beigel with a hole, all this you can get in the Lane. A fish-sweet, half a kishke, an onion, fish, a meaty bone, a bride with a dowry, a woman looking for a husband, such things you can get in the Lane.”

Besides bands with fictitious monikers like Mendel’s where the actual names of the musicians have been lost in time, there are terrific Jewish-themed numbers by the hugely successful stars of the era, like Whitechapel boys Bert Ambrose and Lew Stone, whose BBC Radio broadcasts in the thirties made them household names throughout the nation.

It was an unexpected treat to discover a small run of releases by Johnny Franks & his Kosher Ragtimers, who recorded for the short-lived independent Planetlabel – which operated from a first floor flat in Stamford Hill at the beginning of the fifties. As a lad, Franks worked in his father’s kosher butcher shop, and by his early twenties he was composing and playing on a series of extraordinary recordings. His orchestra can be heard accompanying Chaim Towber, the Ukrainian-born star of the Yiddish Theatre, on perhaps the most well-known track in the collection – the classic ‘Whitechapel’.  It is a poignant homage to a way of life that was disappearing in front of the singer’s eyes as the Jewish community of the area moves out to a suburban homeland.

Another highlight was a collection of 78 rpm discs by the Stepney-born siren of the Yiddish song, Rita Marlowe. Rita graduated from her synagogue choir to performing with dance bands in the pre-war years. She would later devote her career to performing solely in Yiddish, and her recordings were issued on Levy’s Oriole label. Founded in 1890 by Jack Levy selling bicycle parts in Petticoat Lane, Levy’s grew from the ‘Home of Music’ to running recording studios and owning labels and pressing plants, before merging with CBS in the sixties.

Thankfully the Beautiful Music has been preserved in the grooves of ancient discs. Now they are ready for a new journey, offering a nostalgic reunion for those who grew up listening to these songs, perhaps performed live at family functions, or in the ballrooms of the kosher hotel circuit of Brighton or Bournemouth  – the British equivalent of the American ‘Borsht Belt.’ I hope the music will also excite a new generation intrigued by the rich social history of a place that has continued to absorb new cultures, and which has such a remarkable track record of inspiring musical creativity.

Advertisement from the twenties for Weinberg’s Gramophone Shop in Brick Lane

Sheet music for Petticoat Lane, A ‘Kosher’ Medley Foxtrot, 1929

Levy’s label

Advertisement for Levy’s, The Home of Music, Whitechapel

Lew Stone featured on a Radio Celebrities cigarette card, 1934

Max Bacon featured in Radio Pictorial, 1934

Label for Whitechapel released by Planet Recordings, 1951

Advertisement in the Jewish Chronicle in the fifties for Johnny Franks

Label for Why be Angry, Sweetheart? released by Oriole

Click here to buy Music is the Most Beautiful Language in the World – Yiddisher Jazz in London’s East End 1920s – 1950s

The LP comes with a fold-out insert including a detailed essay by Alan Dein, illustrated with rare photos and memorabilia. CDs are available from jwmrecordings@gmail.com

You may also like to read about

Whitechapel Noise

Alexander Hartog, Tenor & Mantle Presser

 

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A music maker sings the coronavirus blues | CANVAS Arts

A music maker sings the coronavirus blues | CANVAS Arts


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A music maker sings the coronavirus blues

Transcript

Judy Woodruff: Finally tonight: singing the coronavirus blues, if you will.

Jeffrey Brown revisits a musician who has met many challenges with song in the past, and now confronts one that is quite personal.

The story is part of our ongoing American Creators series on rural arts and Canvas.

Jeffrey Brown: Outside the Citadel nursing home in Salisbury, North Carolina, an uplifting one-woman performance.

The singer, 63-year-old blues musician Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen.

Pat Cohen: There’s been like a huge outbreak of the coronavirus. And everybody’s in their rooms. And everybody is afraid.

And I want to do something that’s going to brighten up somebody’s day. And in brightening somebody else’s day, it brightens my day also.

Woman: The citadel in Salisbury now considered the site of an outbreak.

Jeffrey Brown: The nursing home is the scene of one of North Carolina’s worst outbreaks of COVID-19.

Health officials say the 160-bed facility has had more than 150 confirmed cases among residents and staff, one of the residents, Pat Cohen’s 59-year-old brother, George. He first went into the home two years ago after suffering a stroke.

He’s not been diagnosed with COVID, but is mostly confined to his bed, and watches his sister perform through the window.

Pat Cohen: My brother used to help me with my equipment that he would carry it to my car for me. And he was — I could always depend on him.

So I’m doing the same thing for him.

Jeffrey Brown: We first met Pat Cohen in 2014 at a gathering in Durham of the Music Maker Relief Foundation, an organization that’s supported more than 400 blues musicians around the South, mostly African-American, often rural, people like Ironing Board Sam, who briefly reached the spotlight, but never made it big, and eked out a living playing small clubs and busking on the streets.

Music Maker helps these musicians meet basic needs and, for some, has gotten them back to performing paying gigs.

Now, founder Tim Duffy says, the shows have stopped. The fear is real.

Tim Duffy: They’re scared.

When you live — like, an average check is like $600 to $800 a month, sometimes as low as $400 a month. All the artists that we are working with, a lot of them are between 75 and 85 and have diabetes. They’re highly intelligent.

And so, like, they will tell me, if I make a mistake, I might die, if I touch the wrong thing. So, they’re being very, very careful. But that’s a lot of pressure to live under.

Jeffrey Brown: A lot of artists and arts organizations are now looking to new models, like streaming…

Tim Duffy: Yes.

Jeffrey Brown: … as a way to stay connected, also to possibly raise funds.

Is that sort of thing possible for you and these artists?

Tim Duffy: It’s possible, but there’s a great digital divide. They’re elderly. They don’t know how to use the devices. A lot of places are in rural communities that don’t have the best Internet, so we can’t do that.

Jeffrey Brown: Pat Cohen was once a regular on the New Orleans scene. She lost her home during Hurricane Katrina, along with her professional connections.

Music Maker helped her relocate to North Carolina and pick up her career. She was scheduled to perform at Jazz Fest earlier this month, in fact, and in Portugal later on. But now all the gigs are gone, the money not coming in.

Pat Cohen: If all you do is sing or play an instrument, or whatever it is, you don’t know what you’re going to do, because, after this is over, if it’s ever over — you wonder if it’s ever going to be over.

You don’t know how things are going to change. And you know it’s going to change. Will there ever be live concerts again?

Jeffrey Brown: She used to be paid to perform inside the nursing home. Now there’s just singing outside to lift up her brother and others.

Music Maker’s Tim Duffy says it’s another example of why the musicians he’s worked with for 25 years deserve our respect and help.

Tim Duffy: She just keeps on going.

And now she literally has very little money. And she gets up the gumption to go out and sing for them and do something to help others with what she has. She has joy in her heart. She has music. And I think, in times of crisis, we look for our folk musicians to guide us. That’s their role. They’re bards.

Jeffrey Brown: Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen puts it this way:

Pat Cohen: Everybody has a currency, and everybody’s currency is different. My currency is my voice.

You don’t have to do what I do, but do something nice for somebody else. And that makes you feel good. And that’s contagious by itself.

Jeffrey Brown: Blues, both sad and joyful, now comforting others in a time of pandemic.

For the “PBS NewsHour,” I’m Jeffrey Brown.

Judy Woodruff: And singing to her brother, that is special.

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Ken Osmond, Eddie Haskell on ‘Leave It to Beaver,’ dies | PBS NewsHour

Ken Osmond, Eddie Haskell on ‘Leave It to Beaver,’ dies | PBS NewsHour


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Ken Osmond, Eddie Haskell on ‘Leave It to Beaver,’ dies

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ken Osmond, who played the two-faced teenage scoundrel Eddie Haskell on TV’s “Leave It to Beaver,” died Monday, his family said.

Osmond died in Los Angeles at age 76. No indication of the cause was given.

“He was an incredibly kind and wonderful father,” son Eric Osmond said in a statement. “He had his family gathered around him when he passed. He was loved and will be very missed.”

Ken Osmond’s Eddie Haskell stood out among many memorable characters on the classic family sitcom “Leave it to Beaver,” which ran from 1957 to 1963 on CBS and ABC, but had a decades-long life of reruns and revivals.

Eddie was the best friend of Tony Dow’s Wally Cleaver, big brother to Jerry Mathers’ Beaver Cleaver. He constantly kissed up to adults and kicked down at his peers, usually in the same scene, and was the closest thing the wholesome show had to a villain. Viewers of all ages loved to hate him.

“He was a terrific guy, he was a terrific actor and his character is probably one that will last forever,” Dow told The Associated Press on Monday.

“He was one of the few guys on the show who really played a character and created it,” Dow added, chuckling as he mimicked the evil laugh Osmond would unleash when his character was launching one nefarious scheme or another and trying to pull Wally and his younger brother Beaver into it.

Osmond was born in Glendale, California, to a carpenter father and a mother who wanted to get him into acting. He got his first role at age 4, working in commercials and as a film extra, and got his first speaking role at 9, appearing mostly in small guest parts on TV series.

The role of Eddie in season one of “Leave It to Beaver” was also supposed to be a one-off guest appearance, but the show’s producers and its audience found him so memorable he became a regular, appearing in nearly 100 of the show’s 234 episodes.

Osmond returned to making guest appearances on TV shows including “The Munsters” in the late 1960s, but found he was so identified with Eddie Haskell that it was hard to land roles.

He would give up acting and become a Los Angeles police officer.

“I was very much typecast. It’s a death sentence,” Osmond told radio host Stu Stoshak in a 2008 interview on “Stu’s Show.” “I’m not complaining because Eddie’s been too good to me, but I found work hard to come by. In 1968, I bought my first house, in ’69 I got married, and we were going to start a family and I needed a job, so I went out and signed up for the LAPD.”

Dow, who was a lifelong friend of Osmond’s said “His motorcycle cop stories are terrific.”

Osmond and wife Sandra Purdy had two sons, Eric and Christian.

He would return to TV in 1983, when “Leave It to Beaver” reruns were having a heyday, appearing in the TV movie “Still the Beaver.”

A revival series, “The New Leave It to Beaver,” came next, with Osmond reprising the role of Haskell alongside Dow and Mathers from 1983 to 1989.

In the 80s he also appeared in “Happy Days,” the series set in the “Leave It to Beaver” era, and the TV movie “High School USA.”

In 2014 he co-authored the memoir “Eddie: The Life and Times of America’s Preeminent Bad Boy.”

AP Writer John Rogers contributed to this story.

 

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Music Documentary Review: “Up From the Streets” — New Orleans’ History of Oppression and Creativity

Music Documentary Review: “Up From the Streets” — New Orleans’ History of Oppression and Creativity


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Music Documentary Review: “Up From the Streets” — New Orleans’ History of Oppression and Creativity

May 18, 2020 1 Comment

By Clea Simon

Up From the Streets is no New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival — but it tries.

The Up From the Streets virtual film festival through May 21: https://watch.eventive.org/upfromthestreets

Trumpeter Terence Blanchard in the documentary Up From the Streets, streaming through May 21.

In a better world, I’d be just back from New Orleans. Every spring since 1989, I’ve attended at least one weekend of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival (Jon has joined me since 1993). This annual festival — always the last weekend in April and the first in May — has, since 1970, celebrated not just the namesake music but also, truly, the heritage. With its mind-boggling array of food booths, crafts, and demonstrations packed onto the Fair Grounds Race Course, the event presents this multicultural city in a nutshell. Despite the usual gripes — the crowds have grown too big, too many headliners have nothing to do with the Crescent City (this year would have brought The Who), the ticket prices have gone up astronomically — it’s still reliably wonderful, and I was always happy to pack in with the something like 200,000 annual visitors. Until, of course, we couldn’t.

Because even before we grabbed another bowl of Prejean’s awe-inspiring pheasant, duck, and andouille gumbo, the Fest, as it’s known, always offered, along with those international superstars, an across-the-spectrum selection of New Orleans music. There was trad jazz in the Economy Hall tent, zydeco on the Fais Do Do stage, brass bands, jazz, and blues. Over the past few years, we’d grown used to starting our day with whatever Mardi Gras Indian gang was opening at the Jazz and Heritage stage and taking it from there.

That absence makes the release of Up From the Streets bittersweet. This 104-minute film, directed by Michael Murphy with four-time Grammy winner Terence Blanchard as executive producer, music director, and host, should have been on the film festival circuit this spring. Already the recipient of  the Documentary Feature Award of Excellence at the Indie Fest Film Festival and the Juried Gold Award Winner for Best Feature Documentary at Houston WorldFest Film Festival, it is currently available as part of a virtual festival through May 21 to stream, for a fee of $12, part of which goes to support the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation’s Jazz & Heritage Music Relief Fund and part of which goes to the cinema that would have screened the film. (Viewers, who have 72 hours to watch the film once they have purchased it, have such options as Provincetown’s Waters Edge Cinema or the Amherst Cinema.)

The documentary is no Fest, but it tries. A bit of a laundry list, much of the film plays like a survey course, ticking off, via photos, film clips, recordings, and testimonials, Buddy Bolden, Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Fats Domino, Professor Longhair, Dr. John, and on up through bounce rapper Big Freedia. There’s solid musicology here. Murphy pays tribute to the music’s European sources — New Orleans had regular opera performances as early as 1796 — as well as the diversity of the African cultures that contributed various harmonic or rhythmic styles. (Ned Sublette’s The World That Made New Orleans offers the ultimate dissection of the different African and European contributions.)

 

 

These musical influences are set into historical context. Up From the Streetsdoesn’t shy away from the fact that the roots of so much of this art lies in slavery — particularly slavery as it was experienced in New Orleans. Under French control from 1682 to1762 and again 1801–03, the city allowed enslaved people one day a week to gather, play drums, and dance as they or their parents once had in Africa. This not only kept the music alive, it allowed it to evolve and syncretize with other styles, including contributions from the Caribbean, following the exodus after the Haitian revolution. The result was something truly new — jazz.

This history of oppression and creativity continued after emancipation through the travails of African American musicians trying to tour and earn a living under Jim Crow. Meanwhile, jazz and blues expanded, melding with gospel, inspiring soul and R&B and, of course, rock and roll. As times changed, musicians such as Mahalia Jackson on down lent their talents to the Civil Rights movement. Murphy traces this evolution by way of the city’s musical trademark, its distinctive syncopation – a kind of backwards clavé — as it moved into its present-day incarnations, from Ivan Neville carrying on his family’s traditions with Dumpstaphunk to the bouncy pop stylings of Tank and the Bangas.

Although the film includes white faces — Fest producer Quint Davis; Ben Jaffe, a second-generation music preservationist and currently creative director/tubist/bassist with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band; and superstar pianist/actor Harry Connick Jr., among others – it rightly focuses on the African American musicians and their legacy. It’s a complicated story, one that many of these musicians had to play both sides of to survive, and Murphy chooses his examples with care. Louis Armstrong, for example, took critical flak for acquiescing to some aspects of apparent minstrelsy during his long career. But Murphy focuses on Armstrong’s groundbreaking musicianship as well as the points he could make, such as replacing “sleepy time” with “slavery” during a session recording his signature song, “When It’s Sleepy Time Down South.”

It’s a history — and a battle — that continues to this day. A native of the city, Blanchard recalls seeing the statue of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard come down in 2017. With his emotion clear in his voice, Blanchard explains that this statue, which he passed every day on his way to high school, was simply a part of the landscape and yet, when it was winched up, he felt a huge weight taken off his shoulders. A weight he hadn’t known was there.

A scene from Up From the Streets.

Through it all, the music has continued. Except, that is, for the silence. That’s how August 2005’s Hurricane Katrina — aka the federal flood, as many in the city recall it — is remembered by Connick.  The by-now familiar, horrible footage of water as high as street signs, of people on their rooftops, is interspersed with Connick and others talking about how disturbing, how unnatural the lack of music and crowd noise was. Jaffe, who was living just off Frenchman Street, recalls how that non-stop street of clubs was devoid of human sounds. From there, a choked-up Davis recalls Mitch Landrieu, then the lieutenant governor of Louisiana, talking to him about how Fest had to come back. The Fairgrounds was flooded, there was no electricity, and yet, eight months later, they did it.

Murphy includes footage of that wonderful, joyful revival. It features Bruce Springsteen’s emotional closing set on the big stage: hundreds of thousands waving and singing (and crying) along to “My City of Ruins.” But he then wisely turns to Irma Thomas joining Paul Simon on “Bridge Over Troubled Water” — Allen Toussaint on piano, naturally –and her powerful voice, finding the gospel in the pop song to help the healing along.

This year, the novel coronavirus did what a Katrina couldn’t. The festival was first postponed, then cancelled. Watching this film and seeing Toussaint, Dr. John, Fats… so many of the musicians featured here are gone. (Earlier this month, Irma allowed New Orleans’ Jazz and Heritage station WWOZ to re-broadcast two live sets as a re-creation of her annual Mother’s Day performance, and her pre-recorded message, which sounded like it had been done on an iPhone, was so wonderful to hear.) The virus has hit this city hard, and its population of music makers — largely African American, many afflicted by the pre-existing health conditions endemic in a historically oppressed population — has taken huge losses. Can it come back again?

A few years ago — fifteen? more? –  I recall wandering into a small record store alongside St. Louis Cathedral, in Pirate’s Alley. There, alongside a smartly curated collection of traditional jazz rarities and local pressings, Jon and I found a good selection of bounce — the New Orleans rap that carried on the latest manifestation of the African-Caribbean beat.  CDs and singles by 5th Ward Weebie, Master P, Mystikal, and others filled out a full corner of what was otherwise a very old-school shop. The proprietor, a white-haired gentleman with a British accent, answered our questions about the then-burgeoning scene, telling us about gigs he’d been to and where to find the latest. How did he know? The question — even directed to an older, white, non-New Orleanian native — seemed almost rude to ask, and yet we did. The answer, as I recall, was simple: “I know many of these young artists’ fathers,” he told us. “They’re jazz musicians.” He gestured eloquently to the remainder of his stock. Community, indeed.


Clea Simon’s most recent novel is An Incantation of Cats: A Witch Cats of Cambridge Mystery. She can be reached at www.CleaSimon.com.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Donn Trenner, a larger-than-life figure in CT jazz circles, dies at 93 – CTInsider.com

Donn Trenner, a larger-than-life figure in CT jazz circles, dies at 93 – CTInsider.com


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https://www.ctinsider.com/entertainment/nhregister/article/Donn-Trenner-a-larger-than-life-figure-in-CT-15279094.php
 

Donn Trenner, a larger-than-life figure in CT jazz circles, dies at 93

Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.
1of12Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.Photo: Courtesy of Sara Trenner / Contributed
Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.
2of12Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.Photo: Courtesy of Sara Trenner / Contributed
Donn Trenner, left, with his daughter, Sara Trenner. Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.
3of12Donn Trenner, left, with his daughter, Sara Trenner. Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, Photo: Courtesy of Sara Trenner / Contributed /
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GUILFORD — Jazz pianist Donn Trenner was a larger-than-life musical figure for decades in Connecticut, after returning from decades on the national scene, where he rubbed shoulders, toured and recorded with Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus, Stan Getz, Ann-Margret, Steve Allen, Bob Hope and Shirley MacLaine.

But his daughter, Sara Trenner, doesn’t think Trenner, who died Saturday at 93, apparently of natural causes, would want to be best remembered for any of that.

 

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“I think first and foremost he would want to be remembered as a kind and giving person to everyone he knew and everyone he met,” she said Monday. “It’s kind of silly, but I think first and foremost he’d want to be remembered for being a really good dad.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Donn Trenner, a larger-than-life figure in CT jazz circles, dies at 93 – CTInsider.com

Donn Trenner, a larger-than-life figure in CT jazz circles, dies at 93 – CTInsider.com


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https://www.ctinsider.com/entertainment/nhregister/article/Donn-Trenner-a-larger-than-life-figure-in-CT-15279094.php
 

Donn Trenner, a larger-than-life figure in CT jazz circles, dies at 93

Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.
1of12Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.Photo: Courtesy of Sara Trenner / Contributed
Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.
2of12Donn Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.Photo: Courtesy of Sara Trenner / Contributed
Donn Trenner, left, with his daughter, Sara Trenner. Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, 2020.
3of12Donn Trenner, left, with his daughter, Sara Trenner. Trenner, a giant in Connecticut jazz who returned to Guilford in 1996 after decades in Los Angeles and as a player on the national and international music scene, was remembered fondly for being a gentleman and a good father, as well as for his musical prowess. He died on Saturday, May 16, Photo: Courtesy of Sara Trenner / Contributed /
  •  
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  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
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GUILFORD — Jazz pianist Donn Trenner was a larger-than-life musical figure for decades in Connecticut, after returning from decades on the national scene, where he rubbed shoulders, toured and recorded with Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus, Stan Getz, Ann-Margret, Steve Allen, Bob Hope and Shirley MacLaine.

But his daughter, Sara Trenner, doesn’t think Trenner, who died Saturday at 93, apparently of natural causes, would want to be best remembered for any of that.

 

Already a subscriber? Log In

Become an Insider to continue reading

Get unlimited digital access to members-only content and exclusive benefits for just 95¢

You can cancel at any time.

Get Access Now

“I think first and foremost he would want to be remembered as a kind and giving person to everyone he knew and everyone he met,” she said Monday. “It’s kind of silly, but I think first and foremost he’d want to be remembered for being a really good dad.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO
 


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Remembering Little Richard’s Kind Heart and One-of-a-Kind Soul – Rolling Stone

Remembering Little Richard’s Kind Heart and One-of-a-Kind Soul – Rolling Stone


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https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/little-richard-peter-guralnick-tribute-1000420/
 

Remembering Little Richard’s Kind Heart and One-of-a-Kind Soul

Peter Guralnick recalls two encounters with the rock & roll legend

May 15, 2020 1:26PM ET

GERMANY - CIRCA 1960:  Photo of Dave KNIGHTS and Little RICHARD  (Photo by Siegfried Loch - K & K/Redferns)

Siegfried Loch – K & K/Redferns/Getty Images

The first time I met Little Richard, I had just gotten back from his hometown (and Otis Redding’s, and, more or less, James Brown’s) of Macon, Georgia. It was 1984, and I was working on my book Sweet Soul Music (which wouldn’t be published for a couple of years), while Richard was promoting his own authorized biography, The Life and Times of Little Richard: The Quasar of Rock— which, if you haven’t read it already, you must. It’s a masterpiece of honest, and eloquent (self)-reporting.

Richard had been booked on a noon-time talk show in Boston, and they decided for no good reason – for no reason whatsoever – that they needed an “outside expert” to join him. But Richard didn’t need anybody to serve as his interpreter, and I didn’t. My grandmother said to me afterwards, “He didn’t let you get a word in edgewise.” Why should he have? I was just thrilled to be there.

We sat in the green room for maybe 45 minutes before we got our call. Because I had just returned from my trip to Macon, which was,  of course, going to play a big role in my new book, I hesitantly threw out the names of some of the people I had met, like Hamp Swain, the “King Bee,” the DJ  who MCed the talent shows at the Douglass Theater; Zenas Sears, an Atlanta star-maker (he got Richard his first recording contract, with RCA, in 1951); and Otis Redding’s brother, Rodger. I also threw in the names of such noted figures from Little Richard’s past as Fats Gonder, Gladys Williams, and Clint Brantley, his first manager, who in his time had also managed James Brown and Otis Redding, both of whom had started out their careers as Little Richard imitators.

Top articles1/5READ MORERS Charts: Nav Takes Number One With ‘Good Intentions’

These are not household names, though you will learn much more about them if you read Richard’s book. But Little Richard lit up like a Christmas tree at their mention — and not in any way you might imagine from his public appearances. There was none of the affect of the latter-day TV personality, no “shut ups,” no cleverly rhyming, non-stop encomiums to himself.  Instead, there was the unfeigned enthusiasm of a committed creative artist, who was engaged, down-to-earth, and consumed with the need to talk about, and pay eloquent tribute to, these people who had genuinely inspired him. Richard had what appeared to be a photographic memory — but more to the point, he possessed an analytic perception of the world from which he had emerged that made every detail come to life, from his joining a family group called the Tiny Tots as a small child to his singing to attract a crowd for Dr. Nobilio, the Macon “town prophet.” “I was always singing,” he said without a trace of boastfulness or braggadocio.

The only other time I saw Richard like that — and he wasn’t quite like that — came in 2011, in New Orleans, when I interviewed him together with Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Fats Domino, in an oral history project for the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Richard had not been in good health for quite some time, but his spirit was undiminished, and he was not about to play second fiddle to anyone. His recollections of Billy Wright, the time Sister Rosetta Tharpe had him sing for her backstage at the Macon City Auditorium (Clint Brantley was producing the show) and then presented him as her “find” to her audience, and his adventures going out with various medicine shows as a very young man were as compelling as ever — even as they were not infrequently interrupted by cheerful admonitions and self-proclamations. “You know,” he declared to his equally legendary associates, “I think it was God who brought us all to be together here.” To which Jerry Lee Lewis, an intensely religious man himself, demurred at what I think he took to be a too-casual appropriation of faith. “I don’t know about you,” he declared with a certain amount of amusement, “but I came here on a plane. And I think you came by bus!”

But it was Richard’s kindness to Fats Domino that stood out most that day. He had first met Fats at the Manhattan Club in Macon, at a time when Fats was already a big star and he was still washing dishes at the Greyhound bus station. Like everyone else in the room, he had never forgotten Fats’ graciousness or his musical greatness. By the time of this get-together in New Orleans, Fats was suffering from dementia — he was as sweet as ever, but he seemed to be feeling both isolated and depressed, and Richard (and it must be said, Jerry Lee, too) was determined to bring him out of it. Richard offered up memories of old times and sang snatches of Fats’ hits to him, as Fats softly joined in on a few lines and phrases. They exchanged recipes and reminiscences, and Richard promised they would cook up a big pot of red beans and rice (don’t hold me to the recipe) when this was all over. At this point there wasn’t the slightest trace of Little Richard the Innovator, the Originator, the Emancipator, or any of his other self-proclaimed titles. There was just the Little Richard that Fats Domino had first met nearly 60 years earlier, and Fats’ face was increasingly wreathed with smiles. If you were to have witnessed this scene, I think you would have been convinced that Little Richard was the person you would most want to have by your side if you were having a tough time in your life.

Sometimes — perhaps all too often — his flamboyance could overshadow his talent. But it should never be forgotten: Little Richard was a revolutionary artist.His music represented not just spontaneous flair and unbridled energy, but genius, too — and the determination to be heard, in his own terms. Listen to a soul ballad like “I Don’t Know What You Got (But It’s Got Me”), recorded in the mid-1960s. Has anyone ever surpassed Richard in the ability to tease out a song or convey true depth of emotion? Pick up on a driving number like “He Got What He Wanted (But He Lost What He Had),” Richard’s own gospel composition from 1962, which I suppose might well underscore a theme. Or explore the subtlety of some of those beautifully articulated ballads in styles ranging from country to gospel to R&B (try “Why Don’t You Change Your Way of Living” or “It Is No Secret”), in which he reveals unexpected depths of sensitivity and a lower register that many listeners might never have suspected existed.

I don’t know anyone who could work a song better in live performance. I’ll never forget his headlining a soul show at the Donnelly Theatre in Boston in 1965, bringing the crowd to a riveting climax as he left the mic and crossed over to the lip of the stage, with an unknown Jimi Hendrix playing guitar behind him. For close to 10 minutes, Richard continued to sing, expound, and expand upon the classic 1950s “inspirational” number “Shake a Hand,” all without benefit of vocal amplification, as he and the audience entered into the kind of trance-like state that only James Brown and Solomon Burke (both of whom revered him) could equally inspire.

No one was more dynamic than Little Richard. When he was coaxed out of his show-biz retirement for the first time to tour England with Sam Cooke in 1962, at the end of the show, recalled Sam’s road manager, J.W. Alexander, “Richard came out with a damn chair in his mouth, and he pulled off his [religious] robe, and he literally slayed them.” He sang all of his hits, ran screaming up and down the aisle, and whatever peak Sam had been able to achieve, Richard was able to overcome with what J.W. called his “energizing approach.” Listen to Sam’s Live at the Harlem Square Club, recorded a few months later, and you’ll see the results of Richard’s lesson.

He never shook off his gospel influences — Mahalia Jackson, Professor Alex Bradford, Brother Joe May, Marion Williams most of all. (Don’t miss his — even more, Aretha’s, and Billy Preston’s, too — unforgettable tribute to Williams at the 1993 Kennedy Center Honors Awards.) He was not about to shake off those influences. They remained his inspiration to the end, perhaps the only ones who could match, and sometimes exceed, the unrestrained power of his voice.

But, of course, in the end we’ll always go back to his yowling, head-reared-back-and-beautiful entrance onto the world stage with “Tutti Frutti,” “Ready Teddy,” “Rip It Up,” “Long Tall Sally” — all presented against a brilliant gold-and-orange cover on his very first album, an unequaled proclamation of rock & roll, which announced, simply, Here’s Little Richard.

I don’t think anything could ever surpass the impact of that music the first time you heard it. Here is the memory of a white Macon teenager instantly entranced after hearing Hamp “King Bee” Swain play “Tutti Frutti” on the radio for the first time. “It was hot as hell,” said Phil Walden, future manager of Otis Redding, “and I saw Little Richard on the other side of the street twirling a parasol, and I said to my friend, ‘That’s Little Richard,’ and he crossed the street and walked right by me, and I was scared to even address him, I was in awe of him, but I said, ‘Tutti frutti.’ And he said, ‘Oh, rooty.’ God!”

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Opinion | Sonny Rollins: Art Never Dies – The New York Times

Opinion | Sonny Rollins: Art Never Dies – The New York Times


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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/18/opinion/sonny-rollins-art.html
 

Sonny Rollins: Art Never Dies

It outlives the contentious political veneer that we cast over everything.

By Sonny Rollins

May 18, 2020

This is the first essay in The Big Ideas, a special section of The Times’s philosophy series, The Stone. Over the next two weeks, more than a dozen artists, writers and thinkers — including Mieko Kawakami, Cate Blanchett and others — will answer the question, “Why does art matter?”

When people talk about art, they tend toward a specific type of question. Who was the first to play a tune? Who owns a specific style? Who can judge when borrowing crosses the line? Those are questions for a political, technological world. In my mind, debates about black versus white — whether a guy can make $100 a year or $1 million a year from his art — are just dead ends. And technology, as Aldous Huxley said, is just a faster way of doing ignorant things.

Technology is no savior. We can eat, sleep, look at screens, make money — all aspects of our physical existence — but that doesn’t mean anything. Art is the exact opposite. It’s infinite, and without it, the world wouldn’t exist as it does. It represents the immaterial soul: intuition, that which we feel in our hearts. Art matters today more than ever because it outlives the contentious political veneer that is cast over everything.

In art, we can find a humbling sort of wisdom. We see themes and ideas repeat over many lifetimes. Those ideas don’t belong to any one person, and as they evolve, disappear and reappear, they remind us that regardless of what’s happening now, our lives on this earth will always be part of something bigger. Any astronomer can tell you that what we know about the universe makes up a fraction of what there is to be discovered. Art, in the same way, both inspires us to go out and find something new and highlights what we don’t know.

Music is slightly removed from this, but it’s similar. There’s an axiom that says there is no such thing as “original” music. After what we could consider to be the first sound, from a spiritual perspective — “om” to some, “amen” to others — it’s all the same. Musicians borrow different parts and make them their own, but there’s nothing really new, nothing that hasn’t been done before. Claude Debussy and Johann Sebastian Bach may sound different, but what they did was all there already, in a sense.

When I was young, growing up in Harlem, I heard Fats Waller perform. His playing struck me, and I realized that jazz would be my path in this life. Jazz being the great interpretive music that it is, of course, I didn’t have to sound like Waller. But regardless of who I sounded like, the difference between us would never be more than surface-level, because behind one guy’s personal style is something else.

 

Sonny Rollins performing at the Vitoria-Gasteiz Jazz Festival in northern Spain in 2008. Sonny Rollins performing at the Vitoria-Gasteiz Jazz Festival in northern Spain in 2008.RAFA RIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

In jazz, we don’t consciously borrow in the same way that other artists might. The beauty of improvisation is that it lets you do anything. I don’t know what I’m going to play — that’s where intuition, and art, comes in.

If I want to improvise during “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” for example, first I memorize it. That’s because when I’m performing onstage, I want to let my mind be completely free. “Mary Had a Little Lamb” is there, and I can come back to it if I want, but what I’m creating is greater than the sum of the parts — technical ability, notes, themes — I’ve collected along the way. The song is in the back of my brain where many other things are stored, and in that way, it becomes just another item that I can call upon when I’m playing. The spirit of art shines through in a performance when I stop thinking — when I let the music play itself, not just the one song that I’ve memorized, but all of the songs and experiences I have in my mind. And as things come to me, unplanned, I surprise even myself.

I believe in reincarnation, which means that a person playing music has got a lot of things in his mind that he’s heard already. He puts them together and that comes out in his style. So you might recognize Louis Armstrong’s style, but it’s still derivative of every kind of music that exists. Any experiences that he’s had, or things that he’s played, he takes and folds into himself, and they become something new. Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane — their styles are ultimately made up of many lives, spanning back to that first sound. And that material is there for all musicians and artists to access. It’s an accumulation of wisdom, the context art gives us that puts life into perspective.

When I go to the museum and I look at a piece of art, I’m transported. I don’t know how, or where, but I know that it’s not a part of the material world. It’s beyond modern culture’s political, technological soul. We’re not here to live forever. Humans and materialism die. But there’s no dying in art.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Jorge Santana, Guitarist Who Helped Shape the Sound of Latin Rock with Malo, Is Dead at 68 | WBGO

Jorge Santana, Guitarist Who Helped Shape the Sound of Latin Rock with Malo, Is Dead at 68 | WBGO


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https://www.wbgo.org/post/jorge-santana-guitarist-who-helped-shape-sound-latin-rock-malo-dead-68#stream/0
 

Jorge Santana, Guitarist Who Helped Shape the Sound of Latin Rock with Malo, Is Dead at 68

By  • 5 hours ago

 

Jorge Santana, a guitarist known for his central role in the Latin rock band Malo, as well as his collaborations with the Fania All Stars, died on March 14. He was 68.

His older brother, Carlos Santana, announced his death on Facebook. The family said Jorge died of natural causes.

Jorge Santana’s guitar was a central feature of “Suavecito,” the lead single of Malo’s self-titled 1972 debut. Done to a quasi-bolero, cha-cha-cha beat, the song, whose title means “smooth” in English, was a Top 20 hit, breaking Malo into the pop mainstream. A cultural touchstone for Mexican-Americans, it has been hailed as “the Chicano national anthem.”

 

 

Jorge was still in high school when, in the late 1960s, he joined a horn-driven rhythm-and-blues band called The Fabulous Malibus. An active part of the San Francisco scene, the group was renamed Malo and signed by Warner Brothers. From 1972-74 Malo released four albums on the label: Malo, Dos, Evolution, andAscención.

Like the eponymous band led by Jorge’s brother Carlos, Malo was born from the Chicano multicultural experience found in San Francisco’s Mission District. But it was on FM radio that the band achieved cult status. Their second album, Dos, combined the horndriven approach of bands like Blood, Sweat & Tears; the propulsion of Afro-Cuban rhythms; and the power of rock in Jorge’s soaring guitar leads. Compounding the band’s strengths were ace musicians like lead trumpeter Forrest Butchel, tenor and flute player Hadley Caliman and legendary Cuban conguero Francisco Aguabella.

The band’s front man, Arcelio Garcia, was born in Puerto Rico but raised in San Francisco, from age 3. “He had that James Brown thing happening which matched the power of our horn section,” Jorge said. Tunes on the album like “Momotombo” and “Latin Bugaloo,” which were arranged by trumpeter Tom Harrell and guitarist Abel Zarate, exemplified the in-your-face explosiveness and highly arranged music the band became known for and made fellow musicians take notice.

But the Top 40 pop hit they had produced with “Suavecito” was both a blessing and a curse. For artists in that world, it’s a given that you have to continue producing radio-friendly hits. Malo wasn’t that type of band.

At the time, though, it seemed like the stars were aligning for Latinos. Jorge’s brother, Carlos, had become a bona fide rock star while simultaneously introducing the world of hippie culture to congas, timbales, and bongos. Nuyoricans were coming into their own by redefining Cuban music into what today is known as salsa. The Civil Rights Movement socio-politically inspired Chicanos on the West Coast and Nuyoricans on the East into fighting police brutality and political injustice while investigating their cultural heritage.

Fania Records, the New York label synonymous with salsa, brought it all together on Aug. 24, 1973, with an event at Yankee Stadium that became transformative. Jorge Santana got off of a plane at JFK Airport with three things: a suitcase, his guitar, and an amp. 

“No one picked me up at the airport,” he told me. “I took a cab to the hotel, then I took a cab to the sound check. I brought my own amp with me on the plane.” More than 40,000 people, mostly Nuyorican’s, attended the event and witnessed Carlos’ younger brother rock the house over the montuno of a Cuban guajira entitled “El Ratón,” sung by its composer, Puerto Rican Cheo Feliciano. It was salsa’s first mega-concert, comparable to The Beatles at Shea Stadium. The subsequent album, and his performance in the event, appeared in the theatrically released film Salsa. It cemented the moment and his name into the annals of Latin music history.

 

 

Guillermo “Jorge” Santana was born June 13, 1951, in Autlán de Navarro in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. His father, José, was a violinist who performed popular and mariachi music. His mother, Josefina Barragán Santana, was a homemaker. The family’s eventual move to San Francisco and the variety of music the city had to offer began influencing Jorge’s older brother Carlos in ways that would eventually change music history. By 1963, Jorge began following in his brother’s footsteps, playing guitar himself.

As a founding coleader of Malo, he earned considerable acclaim. But the constant grind of the road and changing personnel — along with the record company asking for another hit — took their toll. The band was eventually dropped by its label, and Jorge departed. He would lead his own groups, recording several solo albums, and occasionally joining his brother on tour; he is featured on the 1993 Santana album Sacred Fire: Live in South America.

Jorge also worked in a management capacity with his brother’s band, he decided to leave that as well. He would devote his life to his family while still performing, and becoming a chief elevator inspector dealing with the complex systems employed in high rises. 

He is survived by his daughter, Michelle (“Misha”), and son, Anthony; two brothers, Tony and Carlos; and four sisters, Irma, Maria, Lety, and Laura. 

I got to know Jorge in 2015, when we played in Japan with Larry Harlow’s Latin Legends band on a weeklong engagement at the Tokyo Blue Note and Tokyo Cotton Club. The nightly standing-room audience was a platform for a Japanese fan club that showed up every night, greeting his every solo by waving a giant banner with Malo’s famous Aztec-inspired snake insignia.

In 2017, Jorge accepted our invitation to be Special Guest Artist at the resident Roberto Ocasio Latin Jazz Camp for high-school music students at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, where I serve as Artistic Director/Artist-In-Residence along with Executive Director Bev Montie.

Jorge Santana had recently completed a new album called Restoration, consisting of all new songs by himself and Marcia Miget. This week on the Latin Jazz Cruise, I will be doing a special segment on his career.

Rest in peace and power, brother Jorge. It was an honor and a privilege to call you a colleague, but more importantly a friend who lives in our our hearts forever.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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Bluesman Lucky Peterson Dies at 55 | Billboard

Bluesman Lucky Peterson Dies at 55 | Billboard


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https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/9379513/bluesman-lucky-peterson-obit
 

Bluesman Lucky Peterson Dies at 55

Lucky-Peterson-1548

Photo by David Redfern/Redferns

American bluesman Lucky Peterson, a master of the six string and the Hammond B3, died Sunday (May 17) at his home in Dallas. He was 55.

Peterson was at home when he “became ill and was rushed to the hospital in critical condition, but unfortunately did not recover,” reads a statement posted on his social pages. The cause of death is not immediately known.

Born Judge Peterson in Buffalo, New York in 1964, Peterson had blues in his veins. His father James Peterson was a notable blues guitarist and owner of The Governor’s Inn, a roadhouse club where many of the genre’s greats would stop by.

 

 

A prodigious talent, “Little” Lucky Peterson gave his first concert when most of us were still learning to use cutlery and his talents were spotted early on by blues legend Willie Dixon. At the age of just 5, Peterson cut his first album, Our Future, produced by Dixon and released through Today/Perception Records.

As legend has it, the likes of Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy graced The Governor’s Inn. Peterson learnt from the best and, before long, he was playing with the greats.

In his teens, Peterson performed and recorded with Etta James, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Little Milton, Otis Rush, Kenny Neil and many more, and he released albums down the years via a string of labels, from Alligator Records, Verve, Gitane, Universal, Dreyfus, JSP Records and others.

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See More

Gone But Not Forgotten: Musicians We Lost in 2020

 

Peterson’s “1-2-3-4”, a cover version of James Brown’s “Please, Please, Please,” cracked the top 40 of Billboard’s Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart in 1971.

The blues veteran touring extensively with his group The Organization and his wife Tamara Tramell, the blues and soul singer, and several live dates were booked in the calendar for 2020, on both sides of the Atlantic.

In October 2019, Peterson celebrated his 50th anniversary as a professional musician with the album release 50 – Just Warming Up! (Jazz Village / PIAS).

“At this time please respect the family’s privacy,” reads the statement on Peterson’s passing, “but do keep them in your prayers.”

 

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Plas Johnson-Llew Matthews-Ron McCurdy Best of the Thursday Night Jazz Salon 11-2-2013 – YouTube

Plas Johnson-Llew Matthews-Ron McCurdy Best of the Thursday Night Jazz Salon 11-2-2013 – YouTube


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https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2

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The Life of ‘Pat’ Patrick, Father of Deval Patrick | BDCWire

The Life of ‘Pat’ Patrick, Father of Deval Patrick | BDCWire


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http://www.bdcwire.com/the-life-and-career-of-lourdine-pat-patrick-jazz-great-and-father-of-deval-patrick/
 

The Life and Career of Lourdine ‘Pat’ Patrick, Jazz Great and Father of Deval Patrick

8 AM 01.09.2015

 

In a basement apartment on the south side of Chicago lived Lourdine “Pat” Patrick and his family, who in July, 1956, welcomed their son Deval into the world. As a musician at that time, Pat played clubs at night and tried to make ends meet. Although he loved his family, Pat’s commitment to music eventually separated him from his wife and kids. 

Pat Patrick was born in East Moline, Illinois on Nov. 23, 1929 to Laverne Williams and Lourdine Patrick, a trumpet player. His father left when he was 12 to pursue a career in California, divorcing his mother. When Pat injured himself playing football, his mother brought him to Boston to receive treatment for 14 months in the state her grandson would one day govern. It was Pat’s desire to learn saxophone at Chicago’s DuSable High School that brought the family to the South Side.

Shortly after high school, Pat was invited to become a part of the Space Trio, a new band formed by Sonny Blount, a respected veteran of Chicago’s jazz scene. Pat would play both alto and baritone saxophone, both E-flat instruments with huge size differences. The baritone, or bari, is a massive woodwind instrument that, when sitting, can bump on the floor if the player isn’t careful. Its low tones are often mistaken for a euphonium or trombone, which join it in the rhythm section. Although it isn’t normally a lead instrument, the instrument has seen plenty of famous players, including jazz great Gerry Mulligan.

It was in October 1952 that Sonny Blount changed his name to Le Sony’r Ra, according to “From Sonny Blount to Sun Ra: The Chicago Years” by Robert L. Campbell, Christopher Trent, and Robert Pruter. The website, hosted by Clemson University, contains a huge wealth of information on the early years of Sun Ra and Pat Patrick’s work together. It is revealed on this site that Patrick, then a member of the Board of Musicians Local 208 Union, was having trouble finding work as a musician after his instruments were stolen the previous summer. By the next summer, Patrick would be enrolled at Florida A&M University.

Pat_Patrick_January_1981,_jamming_at_a_club_in_Portland,_OR

After traveling back and forth between school and playing with what at this point was called the Arkestra, Patrick and the band were featured in the short film, “The Cry of Jazz,” which showed the band as they played a history of various sub genres and styles. The film would eventually be released at the end of the decade, along with a soundtrack featuring the Arkestra. The next few years would see Sun Ra and his Arkestra become a staple of the Chicago jazz community.

Patrick made money playing various gigs with various other musicians during this time. He also developed a relationship with Emily Wintersmith, a high-schooler, starting in 1954.

In Deval Patrick’s 2011 autobiography “A Reason to Believe,” the governor would write “His greatest and first love was music,” and that “An ardent romance it wasn’t.”

In 1956, Deval joined the family, which had also celebrated the birth of a daughter, Rhonda, the year before.

The governor writes that the memories of his infancy and early childhood included “a stern father who always seemed to be observing us critically, and from a distance.”

A few months after his son was born, Pat was featured on the recording of “Down Pat,” credited to the Andrew Hill Combo. Here, Patrick leads the song and has a solo around the 1:40 mark.

 

 

 

 

He also copyrighted the Arkestra song “Two Tones” a few months later. This composition follows Pat Patrick as he solos up and down the register of the instrument, almost hitting the high pitch octaves that he would eventually break through and incorporate into the sound of Sun Ra.

 

 

 

 

In 1957, the El Saturn Label released “Super-Sonic Jazz,” Sun Ra and His Arkestra’s first LP. The album features the song “Sunology,” which, according to John Corbett’s 2007 article “Sun Ra, Street Priest and Father of D.I.Y. Jazz,” includes “two takes of “Sunology,” a vehicle for Pat Patrick’s meaty baritone.”

 

 

 

 

In “Come Rain or Come Shine” from 1958, Patrick solos while accompanied by bass and drums. Sun Ra plays anomalous chords on an electric piano before a chorus of singers takes the song into the next portion, where Ra solos in what sounds like the other side of the room. The piano is very quiet and seemingly distant from the rest of the players, whose voices loudly return towards the end of the recording.

 

 

 

 

It was Christmas 1959 when Pat Patrick, after seeing venues move from live music to DJ nights, better serving teenagers of the time, hooked up with James Moody’s band, which was about to hit the road for New York City.

In an interview with NPR’s Morning Edition, Deval Patrick recites a passage from his autobiography, in which he describes the night his father left:

“As my mother, in tears, slumped in a chair, my father stormed out of the apartment, up the stairs to the street, and was gone. I chased after him — a four-year-old in despair — while he strolled away angrily, shouting at me, ‘Go home! Go home!’ About a block down, he lost his patience, turned suddenly in a rage, and slapped me. I sprawled out on the sidewalk, burning my palms on the pavement. From that position, I watched him walk away.”

Pat Patrick was featured on John Coltrane’s eighth studio album, “Africa/Brass,” released in November 1961. The widely popular record, which followed up “My Favorite Things,”  would be the first Coltrane would produce during his career at Impulse! Records.

One by one, members of the Arkestra would make the move to New York. In summer 1961, Sun Ra made the jump as well, and began to build the Arkestra again on the East Coast.

Deval and his sister would take the train a couple of times to visit their father. In his autobiography, the governor writes that his father, living in a tiny Manhattan studio, took the kids to see the top of the Empire State Building, but accidently bumped his son’s head on a railing while trying to lift him. During the New York World’s Fair, Deval and Rhonda saw their father play “with the Babatunde Olatunji band at the African Pavilion.” According to his book, this event would introduce Deval to the idea of experiencing the world. 

Pat Patrick became immersed in the Free Jazz scene, frequently collaborating with other passionate musicians.

“I didn’t appreciate until a few years ago just how great his range was,” the governor told Guy Raz during an NPR interview. “I didn’t fully appreciate his relationship with Thelonious Monk, the time he spent with Count Basie, his work with John Coltrane, and how central he was to their work.”

In his paper titled “Interstellar Low Ways: Pat Patrick and Free Jazz,” Seattle musician Evan Smith ties the influence of Patrick’s exposure to free jazz to the progression of Sun Ra and the Arkestra’s sound.

Starting in the early ’60s, the band churned out releases multiple times a year featuring innovative and experimental jazz. The first of these was “The Futuristic Sounds of Sun Ra,” which Smith points out is one of the first recordings featuring Patrick back in his chair. Smith uses “Space Jazz Reverie,” as an example of Pat’s progression. At around the two-minute mark, Patrick begins his unorthodox solo, which uses short melodic phrases intermixed with trills that stretch the range of the instrument. His playing goes between the tempo, often hitting the beat off-time. “As Patrick had only recently rejoined Sun Ra at this point,” Smith writes in his paper,  “I believe this solo was highly influential at the time.”

“Cosmic Chaos” on 1965’s The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra, Vol. 2 shows a band fully exposed to free jazz ideas and styling. Pat’s playing throughout the piece takes the full register of the baritone saxophone and stretches it out farther than conventional pieces take it. He brings the instrument to life as it squeals and cries, especially when the song reaches the five-minute mark. The Pat Patrick that played in Chicago had become fully transformed into a progressive power player, shaping sounds and ideas into the heads of listeners and fellow musicians.

 

 

 

 

Deval and Rhonda would see their father when he toured through the city of Chicago, but for most of their childhood, as the governor told Raz on NPR, Pat lived in New York City. Sun Ra and His Arkestra would reach international fame in the next two decades, touring the world.

In early 1970, after Thelonious Monk’s tenor sax player Charlie Rouse left, Patrick was selected to play with the Monk Quartet for about five months. Tours with Monk took Patrick up and down the coast, including a five-day workshop in Boston.

The same year, Deval had begun to attend Milton Academy after receiving a scholarship. The governor writes in his autobiography about his father’s disapproval of the prep school and his fear of Deval losing his sense of heritage and self.

Nevertheless, Deval graduated from Milton Academy in 1974, an event which Pat had unexpectedly shown up to. Sally Jacobs of The Boston Globe wrote in March 2007 that Deval’s parents ended up fighting later that day. “I am thinking, this is supposed to be my day. . . . I just bailed,” said Governor Patrick. By the end of the decade, he was enrolled at Harvard Law School.

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On Deval’s 25th birthday in 1981, Pat invited him to a show happening in Washington D.C. As he recalled on “Morning Edition,” Pat dedicated “I Can’t Get Started,” a song written by Ira Gershwin and popularized by Bob Hope, to his son. The song follows the viewpoint of a man who has mastered everything he started, except gaining the admiration of someone he loved. 

“I gazed right back at him, knowing what he was trying to say: Life is too short to go on like this. Let’s find a way to come together,” Patrick told NPR.

Pat Patrick died from Leukemia a decade later, but because of the mass amount of material he had recorded with Sun Ra over the decades, new releases seem to pop up every year. Sun Ra and his Arkestra still has a huge fanbase, with concerts celebrating the decades-spanning library, held at music schools and concert halls across the world. Because there were so many releases, it isn’t that uncommon to find records featuring Pat Patrick performances in record shops across the Boston area. 

When Deval was given the contents of his father’s storage locker well into his gubernatorial term, he discovered that letters sent by him and his sister as children were among Pat’s personal belongings. According to Deval, his father saved almost everything: recordings, flyers, notebooks, instruments. Most of his father’s belongings were donated to Berklee’s Africana Studies program and archive a couple of years ago.

And with his time as governor recently coming to a close, one must wonder if Deval will take the time to inspect and learn everything that his father’s collection has to offer. There’s no doubt that the collection must include unreleased material that not even the bootleg music collectors have gotten their hands on yet. Just like the 1964 World’s Fair gave young Deval a yearning to travel and explore the world, his father’s collection may have given him the same type of yearning, starting a journey rediscovering one of Jazz’s unrecognized greats.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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RIP Fred Willard – YouTube

RIP Fred Willard – YouTube


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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/16/arts/television/fred-willard-dead.html

Fred Willard, Comic Actor Who Thrived in Ensembles, Dies at 86

Mr. Willard, who was nominated for four Emmy Awards, was a frequent and memorable collaborator with the director Christopher Guest.

By Johnny Diaz

Updated 4:26 p.m. ET

Fred Willard, the Emmy Award-nominated comic actor best known for his scene-stealing roles in Christopher Guest ensemble comedies like “Best in Show” and “Waiting for Guffman,” died on Friday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 86.

Mike Eisenstadt, Mr. Willard’s agent, confirmed the death.

Mr. Willard played Frank Dunphy, the father of Ty Burrell’s Phil Dunphy, on the ABC sitcom “Modern Family.” In 2010, his performance earned him a nomination for an Emmy as outstanding guest actor in a comedy series. Mr. Willard’s character died of old age in the show’s recently ended final season.

He was also nominated for Emmys in the same category in 2003, 2004 and 2005 for his role as the father of Ray Romano’s sister-in-law on another sitcom, “Everybody Loves Raymond.”

He rose to prominence playing Jerry Hubbard, the sidekick to Martin Mull’s talk-show host Barth Gimble, on the satirical series “Fernwood Tonight” in 1977.

Beginning in 1992, Mr. Willard also made 50 appearances in sketches on “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno.”

A complete obituary will be published shortly.

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Jorge Santana, Malo Leader and Brother of Carlos, Dies | Best Classic Bands

Jorge Santana, Malo Leader and Brother of Carlos, Dies | Best Classic Bands


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Jorge Santana, Malo Leader and Brother of Carlos, Dies


Jorge Santana (Photo via Carlos Santana’s Facebook page)

Jorge Santana, the younger brother of Carlos Santana, and a significant musician himself, died yesterday (May 14). He was 68. Carlos Santana announced his death; the cause was said to be a heart attack at his Bay Area home.

Jorge Santana was the youngest of three brothers and the second after Carlos to pick up the guitar. Beginning in 1972, he was the leader of the band Malo, known for their blend of Latino, rock, jazz and blues. The band released numerous albums; their 1972 self-titled debut LP, as a 12-piece, reached #14 on the Billboard album chart, and featured a big pop hit, “Suavecito,” a #18 pop single that same year.

Carlos Santana posted the news on his Facebook page, shortly before 10 a.m. ET:

We
take
time to
celebrate
the
magnificent
spirit
of our
beloved
brother
Jorge
He transitioned unto the realm of light that cast no shadow
the eyes of my heart clearly see him right in between our glorious and magnificent mother Josefina and our father Jose… They are caressing his face and kissing his hands showering him with Light and Love
We love cherish and honor
your soul MEMO
Carlos and the Santana family

Carlos and Jorge Santana collaborated on the 1994 album Brothers.

Watch them perform on The Late Show with David Letterman later that year

 

 

Born June 13, 1951, in Autlan, Jalisco, Mexico, Jorge Santana was inspired by the musical activity in the household. Without formal music instruction, he started playing the guitar at age 14 in San Francisco.

At first, he was drawn to the sounds and rhythms of the blues and Carlos’ interpretations of that style of music. He credited Carlos with introducing him to a wide range of music, musical styles, personalities and experiences.

By the late ’60s and while still in high school, Jorge was playing with a four-piece blues band in local San Francisco clubs. He was asked to join a band called the Malibus, a nine-piece R&B group with horns. After a steady club gig that helped the band refine its sound, they changed their name to Malo. As part of the active scene in San Francisco in the early ’70s, the band was signed by Warner Bros. Records.

Listen to Malo’s big 1972 hit, “Suavecito”

 

 

Fellow original Malo member Richard Bean first met Santana when a fellow band member brought him to Bean’s home where the Malibus were rehearsing. “From that day on, we began our musical journey,” said Bean, who later joined the Jorge Santana Band.

On his own in 1974, Jorge Santana appeared as a special guest with the Fania All Stars in a concert held at Madison Square Garden. The performance has been released on the Fania label.

He then moved to Mill Valley, Calif., and devoted his time exclusively to a personal exploration of music. Between 1975 and 1977, when he started putting a new band together, Jorge did little but play the guitar. That period led to his first solo project for Tomato Records. Titled Jorge Santana, the album, produced by Tony Bongiovi of the Power Station in New York, featured his own songs and arrangements.

Jorge Santana in the 1970s

That album was followed by It’s All About Love, produced by Allen Toussaint. Santana married in 1982 and moved to Walnut Creek, where he and his wife started a family.

In 1989, Carlos asked Jorge to join the team at Santana Management. He was put in charge of artist relations and his skills and experience led to his involvement in production, music clearances, publishing and a number of other responsibilities, and eventually got him on the road with the Santana band.

It was while on the road, and as Jorge performed with the band on various dates, that the idea for the Brothers album came up. Jorge took an active role on the album, writing, arranging and producing both his own songs and collaborating with Carlos (and nephew Carlos Hernandez) on others.

Malo is still touring, with Richard Bean leading the band, though they are on hiatus due to the Covid-19 pandemic. “My bandmates and I will continue to carry the legacy of Malo in memory of Jorge,” said Bean.

Malo’s current vocalist, Aki Starr, who also served as lead singer for the Jorge Santana Band, said, “In the last 20 years, Jorge became my best friend, my older brother, and someone I loved very much.

“May your beautiful guitar playing bring joy and love to everyone in Heaven.”

Related: Our Album Rewind of a Carlos Santana classic

 

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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The Closest Official Drive-In Movie Theater To NYC Is Reopening This Weekend – Secretnyc

The Closest Official Drive-In Movie Theater To NYC Is Reopening This Weekend – Secretnyc


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https://secretnyc.co/warwick-drive-in-theater-nyc/
 

The Closest Official Drive-In Movie Theater To NYC Is Reopening This Weekend

It’s worth the drive!

Claire LeadenMay 15, 2020

Okay, it’s over an hour away, but in this social distancing age, it’s worth it!

If you can’t snag tickets to the drive-in movie series that started at a diner in Astoria, Queens, there is an actual drive-in move theater in Warwick, New York, just past the northern border of New Jersey. Google Maps says the drive will take about an hour and fifteen minutes from NYC.

Warwick Drive-In, which was built in 1950 and has a rich history as a family business throughout all its opening years, is officially opening back up tonight, May 15. 

They, of course, have instituted a number of safety guidelines during this time in order to follow state mandates. This includes that customers must wear face masks and maintain six feet of distance when outside of their car for any reason, and that employees will wear masks, gloves and frequently wash their work stations. Concessions can be ordered ahead of time online. You can read all of the new rules here.

 

Right now they are showing: Bad Boys for Life, The Invisible Man, Bloodshot, Jumanji: The Next Level, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Trolls World Tour.

You can purchase your tickets (to a double feature, why not? You have the time!) on their website here.

Date
Open 7 Days a Week, Shows at 8 and 10:05pm

Place
Warwick Drive-In
5 Warwick Turnpike
Warwick, NY 10990 

Price
$8-12 per person 

More info

 

featured image source: Instagram / @gregpallante

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
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‘People left her shows happy.’ Melva Houston, renowned singer, dies at 70. | Local News | journalnow.com

‘People left her shows happy.’ Melva Houston, renowned singer, dies at 70. | Local News | journalnow.com


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‘People left her shows happy.’ Melva Houston, renowned singer, dies at 70.

Summer concerts - Melva Houston

Melva Houston, who began her music careet in Memphis with the Stax record label in the 1960s, has died at the age of 70.

H. Kälberer/

Melva Houston, the versatile and internationally renowned jazz, blues and gospel vocalist, died Thursday. She was 70. Thaxton Tucker, Houston’s husband of 38 years, said that she died peacefully in hospice care yesterday. Houston had been battling lung cancer since 2016.

Originally from Memphis, Tennessee, Houston had lived in Mount Airy for 35 years and was one of this area’s most admired singers, but health problems kept her from the public eye recently.

Houston began her music career in Memphis as a backup singer for Isaac Hayes with the legendary Stax record label in the 1960s.

Hayes was Houston’s mentor.

“Isaac would say, ‘I need you on this part right here to do some ‘Oooo-oooo, and here, all I want you to do is hand clap like this. …’ And that was it,” Houston told the Journal 2002. “You heard it, you picked it up, and you’d try to put it down, right there. Usually we did these tracks without even meeting the artists — after everything else was done.”

Houston also sang back-up at Hi Records, the home of Al Green, and went on the road with Sam and Dave, right to the heights of the Apollo Theater in New York, before turning away from the hectic musician’s life for a good part of the ’70, when she worked as a medical assistant. 

She married Tucker in 1979 and moved to North Carolina and her musical life restarted.

She spent part of the ’80s as the lead singer of the Top 40 rock band, Stormy. 

She made her European debut in Germany in 1996. That launched an international career that took her to festivals throughout Europe, and she remained especially popular in Germany.

Karen Greene is a saxophone player who lives in Atlanta but used to live in Greensboro and played with Houston for about 25 years, starting in 1992. 

“We played all over North Carolina and Virginia,” Greene said. When Houston left for Europe, obligations in Atlanta kept Greene there.

“But we were family,” she said.

    TOP ARTICLES1/5READ MOREMEXICO: 2 MORE MASS ALCOHOL POISONINGS, 35 DIE OF METHANOL

Houston visited Greene in Atlanta in 2017 and remembers, “I took her to a restaurant where I had a steady gig, and she tore the house down. They were not expecting that.”

Her voice was good, but her personality was even better, Greene said. 

“She had so much wisdom and experience in her voice. A lot of people have wonderful voices, but she was a wonderful entertainer,” Greene said. “She could hold an audience in the palm of her hand and make them feel that they were involved in everything.

“If she felt the energy from the audience, she just kept going. We played 90-minute, nearly two-hour sets sometimes.”

Matt Kendrick, a local bassist and bandleader, recalled playing with Houston a number of times, especially at the former Speakeasy on Fourth Street in the 2000s.

A YouTube video shows her singing “All Along Broadway” with Kendrick on bass, Roberto Orihuela on vibraphone, Dave Fox on piano and the late Sammy Anflick on drums.

“Good times,” Kendrick said. “It was open mic night at the Speakeasy. … Melva was the co-host with Robert for about six months. She knew that I liked that song, and she would always sing it for me.

“She was always fun to play with. She swung like crazy, and she was a great entertainer to boot; people left her shows happy. I have missed her since she’s been sick, and now she’s gone.” 

Cheyenne Covington, who directed Houston in his theatrical tribute to Nina Simone, “The High Priestess,” in 2002 and 2005 said, “I lost my muse last night. … Almost 20 years ago I heard her voice, and it inspired me on my journey to explore my love for Nina Simone. Melva was my first Little Girl Blue.”

Recently, Houston has been a member of the Gate City Divas. The Greensboro group has eight female R&B, funk and blues performers who are vocalists and multi-instrumentalists.

She was a regular performer at the Carolina Blues Festival in Greensboro and the John Coltrane International Jazz & Blues Festival in High Point and recorded several records for Bottom Records, including “There will never be another you” in 2009 and “Black Coffee” in 2006.

Spencer Funeral Home in Mount Airy is handling the arrangements.

 

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

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Warwick, Ny 10990

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Minnesota Fats vs Willie Mosconi – Legendary Match – YouTube

Minnesota Fats vs Willie Mosconi – Legendary Match – YouTube


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Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO
 


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Warwick, Ny 10990

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Bucky Pizzarelli-Signed Guitar to be Auctioned to Benefit JFA – jim@jazzpromoservices.com – Jazz Promo Services Mail

Bucky Pizzarelli-Signed Guitar to be Auctioned to Benefit JFA – jim@jazzpromoservices.com – Jazz Promo Services Mail


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Bucky Pizzarelli-Signed Guitar to be Auctioned to Benefit JFA – jim@jazzpromoservices.com – Jazz Promo Services Mail

Bucky owned several D’Angelico Guitars throughout his life, which ended up being some of his most cherished instruments—most notably a 1943 Style B which he acquired from one of his mentors, Al Nevins, after he passed away. The guitar was originally painted white in order to match the aesthetic of the band both Al and Bucky played in called the “Three Suns.” Eventually, the band disbanded and Bucky took the guitar back to John D’Angelico to refinish it to natural. Bucky’s D’Angelico remained a staple in his rig for his entire professional career, and he always made it a point to stop by the original D’Angelico shop on Kenmare Street when close by. He not only toured with the D’Angelico throughout his years with the Benny Goodman band, but also used it on countless hit recordings and duo records with his son John. In 2013, Bucky appeared on CBS Sunday Morning news with his D’Angelico and recounted the story of Les Paul coming over to his house and ‘borrowing’ it for over a year. In 2018, at age 92, Bucky performed with his D’Angelico one last time at Lincoln Center, playing the great standard ‘Lil Darlin’ originally written for the Count Basie Orchestra—this was his last public performance.

Bucky, his son John Pizzarelli and their entire family have been supporters of the Jazz Foundation for many years. One of the most memorable performances in the history of the Foundation occurred at it’s 2009 “A Great Night In Harlem” concert at the Apollo Theater, when Bucky was joined by his dear friends Gene Bertoncini and JFA Board member, Dr. Frank Forte. Bucky was especially supportive of Dr. Forte’s efforts with the Dizzy Gillespie Memorial Fund at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in New Jersey, where more than $7 million in free care was provided to over 2,000 uninsured and underinsured musicians since 1994. 

TO BID ON THIS GUITAR CLICK HERE


Additional Lot
Details

  • This piece is new.
  • Includes a certificate of authenticity.
  • Includes a hardshell case.
  • The guitar has a starting value (without signature) of $1500 USD.
  • Due to the current heath crisis, shipment may be delayed.

Lot #2038000


Rules & Regulations

  • In condition as donated.
  • Cannot be returned or exchanged.
  • Additional shipping charges may apply based upon the location of the winner.

About
the Charity
Lot page thumbThe Jazz Foundation of America’s COVID-19 Musician’s Emergency Fund
To help musicians and their families with basic living expenses.

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO
 


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Warwick, Ny 10990

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Upbeat Story of Jazz, Sassy French Film Open Friday at The Tull Family Theater – Hampton Journal

Upbeat Story of Jazz, Sassy French Film Open Friday at The Tull Family Theater – Hampton Journal


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Upbeat Story of Jazz, Sassy French Film Open Friday at The Tull Family Theater

Thursday, May 14, 2020 | 8:16 PM


Up from the Streets TB_River
 

The answers to why New Orleans is the birthplace of jazz, and the kinship that springs from that music fills Up From the Streets–New Orleans: The City of Music. The film arrives Friday in The Tull Family Theater’s Virtual Screening Rooms. As a bonus, a free, live online event will be available on Saturday at 7 p.m.,  with six-time Grammy winner and film host Terence Blanchard as well as director  Michael Murphy.

To register and submit questions through Chat, visit Eventive here.

Also opening Friday is an  award-winning French feature on the abandonment, then eventual self-reliance, of a wife and young mother, Alice.

Programming notes are below. Those who would like technical assistance  to access these films are encouraged to email hello@thetullfamilytheater.org with their contact information, and a manager will get right back to them–a free service.

Up from the Streets–New Orleans: The City of Music
1h 44min | Documentary, Music, History
Director: Michael Murphy
Stars: Terence Blanchard, Bruce Sunpie Barnes, Germaine Bazzle

This film examines the culture of New Orleans through the lens of music. Hosted by Oscar nominee and six-time Grammy winner Terence Blanchard, the film shares how music and culture intersected to create a distinct form of expression in the Crescent City, birthplace of jazz. Starting with the drumming of free and enslaved Africans in Congo Square, the documentary shares the explosion of musical styles on the Mississippi delta and the power of music to change lives. Hear Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, the musical Marsalis family, the Neville brothers, Harry Connick Jr. and many others as they perform and guide viewers into the world of jazz.

Alice
1h 43min | Comedy, Drama, Romance
Director: Josephine Mackerras
Stars: Emilie Piponnier, Martin Swabey, Chloé Boreham
In French, subtitled in English

After her husband drains her bank account Alice is broke, and desperate. This first feature by writer-director Josephine Mackerras, a SXSW Grand Jury Prize production, follows Alice’s struggles.

“The writer-director’s first feature has much going for it, above all a striking performance by Emilie Piponnier in the title role,” declares the Hollywood Reporter.

“It’s rare to see a minor-key drama that doesn’t overextend the nature of the material,” says IndieWire, “and rarer still for cinema to dig this deep into the female psyche without boxing it in.”

Jim Eigo Jazz Promo Services T: 845-986-1677 E-Mail: jim@jazzpromoservices.com
https://www.jazzpromoservices.com

HAVE A JAZZ EVENT, NEW CD OR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE JAZZ COMMUNITY YOU WANT TO PROMOTE? CONTACT JAZZ PROMO SERVICES FOR PRICE QUOTE.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE VIDEO
 


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PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2020 All rights reserved.

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269 State Route 94 South

Warwick, Ny 10990

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