Specializing in Media Campaigns for the Music Community, Artists, Labels, Venues and Events

slide

▶ Sir Charles Thompson October 1, 2010 – YouTube

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
I had no idea that the great jazz pianist Sir Charles Thompson (http://jazzdiscography.com/Artists/Thompson/index.php) was still with us, but according to Michael Steinman’s JAZZ LIVES blog post today (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/something-for-sir-charles-thompson-who-is-happily-with-us-ray-skjelbred-kim-cusack-clint-baker-katie-cavera-jeff-hamilton-sacramento-music-festival-may-2014/) he’s alive and well living in Japan.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alrfjWKbaeM

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=a070dd7843) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=a070dd7843&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Miles Davis’s Jazz Masterpiece ‘Kind of Blue’ Is Redone – WSJ

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://online.wsj.com/articles/miles-daviss-jazz-masterpiece-kind-of-blue-is-redone-1412699010

** Miles Davis’s Jazz Masterpiece ‘Kind of Blue’ Is Redone
————————————————————

Miles Davis CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images

When the CD “Blue” (Hot Cup) is released next Tuesday by the band Mostly Other People Do the Killing, the album will likely trigger an uproar among jazz fans. Unlike most tribute albums, which rely on interpretation, “Blue” is a note-for-note replication of Miles Davis ’s “Kind of Blue”—the 1959 album that influenced several generations of jazz and rock musicians.

Choosing to copy any iconic album takes audacity and raises some controversy, but when the dust settles, “Blue” could wind up spawning a new music genre—verbatim versions of classic albums. If “Blue” is even moderately successful, jazz, rock and soul musicians may be motivated to clone other pivotal works like the Beatles’ “Rubber Soul,” Marvin Gaye ’s “What’s Going On” and John Coltrane ’s “A Love Supreme.”

For now, though, “Blue” has some seasoned critics scratching their heads. “I can’t think of another album in the modern jazz era that has gone this far with imitation,” said jazz author and critic Dan Morgenstern. “Why bother replicating a masterpiece that already exists? There’s only one original.”

“Blue” isn’t the first jazz tribute album to cling to its inspiration. In the 1970s, Supersax and Dave Pell’s Prez Conference transcribed the sax solos of Charlie Parker and Lester Young for a reed section. And in 2008, Zenph Studios, a music-technology firm, recorded a special digital piano playing intricate solos first performed by pianist Art Tatum.

“Blue,” however, is different. The band took the extra step of mirroring all aspects of the source material—from individual solos to tempo differentiations and tape-recorder hiss. “Before people get too worked up over this, they need to realize that our album is a copy, not a clone—an object designed to reaffirm what people already love about ‘Kind of Blue’ and to highlight what we could and couldn’t pull off,” says the band’s 36-year-old bassist and leader Matthew “Moppa” Elliott. “That’s where the art is—getting people to think about the original by listening harder to the differences.”

The concept for “Blue” was first discussed in 2004 when Mr. Elliott and several other Oberlin Conservatory of Music graduates floated the idea of reproducing the Miles Davis classic. “We wanted to crawl inside the music to figure out what made it great,” Mr. Elliott said. “It turned out that specific notes became less interesting than how they needed to be played.”

But once the instrumental parts from “Kind of Blue” were transcribed in 2011, the band ran into several studio hurdles, including recording together the way the Miles Davis Sextet did originally. “The smallest errors called for retakes,” Mr. Elliott said. “Eventually the rhythm section recorded the basic tracks with the horns added later, their solos recorded individually. Instead of using tenor and alto saxophonists for John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, Jon Irabagon doubled on both.”

Following in the footsteps of jazz giants also led to discoveries. “[Bassist] Paul Chambers had an interesting way of shifting his hand to give him the widest range of note possibilities,” Mr. Elliott said. “He also had ways of getting himself out of awkward positions. If he found he was too high up in the bass’s register, he’d mute notes and articulate with his right hand by thumping on a string without pitch content or by playing eighth notes as if bouncing in place to keep the ear occupied as he came down to where he needed to be.”

Though trumpeter Peter Evans (http://topics.wsj.com/person/E/Peter-Evans/7514) , who plays Miles Davis’s parts, recently left the group to devote more time to his projects, Mr. Elliott says the “Blue” band never intended to tour. “You can’t take this on the road and expect studio results, which was the whole point,” he said. “Even the Miles Davis Sextet sounded different when they played album selections live. For us, it was always about the studio experience—the archaeology of it.”

After listening to a few songs from “Blue,” drummer Jimmy Cobb, the only surviving member of the “Kind of Blue” sextet, agreed. “These guys are proficient—I thought they were us at first—but I don’t hear the human part, the individual sound and feel I lived with on those sessions,” he said. “But, hey, classical has been doing this for centuries—playing the notes someone else wrote. If these guys took the time to do this, the music must mean something to them.”

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=993cc35d03) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=993cc35d03&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Miles Davis’s Jazz Masterpiece ‘Kind of Blue’ Is Redone – WSJ

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://online.wsj.com/articles/miles-daviss-jazz-masterpiece-kind-of-blue-is-redone-1412699010

** Miles Davis’s Jazz Masterpiece ‘Kind of Blue’ Is Redone
————————————————————

Miles Davis CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images

When the CD “Blue” (Hot Cup) is released next Tuesday by the band Mostly Other People Do the Killing, the album will likely trigger an uproar among jazz fans. Unlike most tribute albums, which rely on interpretation, “Blue” is a note-for-note replication of Miles Davis ’s “Kind of Blue”—the 1959 album that influenced several generations of jazz and rock musicians.

Choosing to copy any iconic album takes audacity and raises some controversy, but when the dust settles, “Blue” could wind up spawning a new music genre—verbatim versions of classic albums. If “Blue” is even moderately successful, jazz, rock and soul musicians may be motivated to clone other pivotal works like the Beatles’ “Rubber Soul,” Marvin Gaye ’s “What’s Going On” and John Coltrane ’s “A Love Supreme.”

For now, though, “Blue” has some seasoned critics scratching their heads. “I can’t think of another album in the modern jazz era that has gone this far with imitation,” said jazz author and critic Dan Morgenstern. “Why bother replicating a masterpiece that already exists? There’s only one original.”

“Blue” isn’t the first jazz tribute album to cling to its inspiration. In the 1970s, Supersax and Dave Pell’s Prez Conference transcribed the sax solos of Charlie Parker and Lester Young for a reed section. And in 2008, Zenph Studios, a music-technology firm, recorded a special digital piano playing intricate solos first performed by pianist Art Tatum.

“Blue,” however, is different. The band took the extra step of mirroring all aspects of the source material—from individual solos to tempo differentiations and tape-recorder hiss. “Before people get too worked up over this, they need to realize that our album is a copy, not a clone—an object designed to reaffirm what people already love about ‘Kind of Blue’ and to highlight what we could and couldn’t pull off,” says the band’s 36-year-old bassist and leader Matthew “Moppa” Elliott. “That’s where the art is—getting people to think about the original by listening harder to the differences.”

The concept for “Blue” was first discussed in 2004 when Mr. Elliott and several other Oberlin Conservatory of Music graduates floated the idea of reproducing the Miles Davis classic. “We wanted to crawl inside the music to figure out what made it great,” Mr. Elliott said. “It turned out that specific notes became less interesting than how they needed to be played.”

But once the instrumental parts from “Kind of Blue” were transcribed in 2011, the band ran into several studio hurdles, including recording together the way the Miles Davis Sextet did originally. “The smallest errors called for retakes,” Mr. Elliott said. “Eventually the rhythm section recorded the basic tracks with the horns added later, their solos recorded individually. Instead of using tenor and alto saxophonists for John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, Jon Irabagon doubled on both.”

Following in the footsteps of jazz giants also led to discoveries. “[Bassist] Paul Chambers had an interesting way of shifting his hand to give him the widest range of note possibilities,” Mr. Elliott said. “He also had ways of getting himself out of awkward positions. If he found he was too high up in the bass’s register, he’d mute notes and articulate with his right hand by thumping on a string without pitch content or by playing eighth notes as if bouncing in place to keep the ear occupied as he came down to where he needed to be.”

Though trumpeter Peter Evans (http://topics.wsj.com/person/E/Peter-Evans/7514) , who plays Miles Davis’s parts, recently left the group to devote more time to his projects, Mr. Elliott says the “Blue” band never intended to tour. “You can’t take this on the road and expect studio results, which was the whole point,” he said. “Even the Miles Davis Sextet sounded different when they played album selections live. For us, it was always about the studio experience—the archaeology of it.”

After listening to a few songs from “Blue,” drummer Jimmy Cobb, the only surviving member of the “Kind of Blue” sextet, agreed. “These guys are proficient—I thought they were us at first—but I don’t hear the human part, the individual sound and feel I lived with on those sessions,” he said. “But, hey, classical has been doing this for centuries—playing the notes someone else wrote. If these guys took the time to do this, the music must mean something to them.”

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=993cc35d03) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=993cc35d03&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Miles Davis’s Jazz Masterpiece ‘Kind of Blue’ Is Redone – WSJ

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://online.wsj.com/articles/miles-daviss-jazz-masterpiece-kind-of-blue-is-redone-1412699010

** Miles Davis’s Jazz Masterpiece ‘Kind of Blue’ Is Redone
————————————————————

Miles Davis CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images

When the CD “Blue” (Hot Cup) is released next Tuesday by the band Mostly Other People Do the Killing, the album will likely trigger an uproar among jazz fans. Unlike most tribute albums, which rely on interpretation, “Blue” is a note-for-note replication of Miles Davis ’s “Kind of Blue”—the 1959 album that influenced several generations of jazz and rock musicians.

Choosing to copy any iconic album takes audacity and raises some controversy, but when the dust settles, “Blue” could wind up spawning a new music genre—verbatim versions of classic albums. If “Blue” is even moderately successful, jazz, rock and soul musicians may be motivated to clone other pivotal works like the Beatles’ “Rubber Soul,” Marvin Gaye ’s “What’s Going On” and John Coltrane ’s “A Love Supreme.”

For now, though, “Blue” has some seasoned critics scratching their heads. “I can’t think of another album in the modern jazz era that has gone this far with imitation,” said jazz author and critic Dan Morgenstern. “Why bother replicating a masterpiece that already exists? There’s only one original.”

“Blue” isn’t the first jazz tribute album to cling to its inspiration. In the 1970s, Supersax and Dave Pell’s Prez Conference transcribed the sax solos of Charlie Parker and Lester Young for a reed section. And in 2008, Zenph Studios, a music-technology firm, recorded a special digital piano playing intricate solos first performed by pianist Art Tatum.

“Blue,” however, is different. The band took the extra step of mirroring all aspects of the source material—from individual solos to tempo differentiations and tape-recorder hiss. “Before people get too worked up over this, they need to realize that our album is a copy, not a clone—an object designed to reaffirm what people already love about ‘Kind of Blue’ and to highlight what we could and couldn’t pull off,” says the band’s 36-year-old bassist and leader Matthew “Moppa” Elliott. “That’s where the art is—getting people to think about the original by listening harder to the differences.”

The concept for “Blue” was first discussed in 2004 when Mr. Elliott and several other Oberlin Conservatory of Music graduates floated the idea of reproducing the Miles Davis classic. “We wanted to crawl inside the music to figure out what made it great,” Mr. Elliott said. “It turned out that specific notes became less interesting than how they needed to be played.”

But once the instrumental parts from “Kind of Blue” were transcribed in 2011, the band ran into several studio hurdles, including recording together the way the Miles Davis Sextet did originally. “The smallest errors called for retakes,” Mr. Elliott said. “Eventually the rhythm section recorded the basic tracks with the horns added later, their solos recorded individually. Instead of using tenor and alto saxophonists for John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, Jon Irabagon doubled on both.”

Following in the footsteps of jazz giants also led to discoveries. “[Bassist] Paul Chambers had an interesting way of shifting his hand to give him the widest range of note possibilities,” Mr. Elliott said. “He also had ways of getting himself out of awkward positions. If he found he was too high up in the bass’s register, he’d mute notes and articulate with his right hand by thumping on a string without pitch content or by playing eighth notes as if bouncing in place to keep the ear occupied as he came down to where he needed to be.”

Though trumpeter Peter Evans (http://topics.wsj.com/person/E/Peter-Evans/7514) , who plays Miles Davis’s parts, recently left the group to devote more time to his projects, Mr. Elliott says the “Blue” band never intended to tour. “You can’t take this on the road and expect studio results, which was the whole point,” he said. “Even the Miles Davis Sextet sounded different when they played album selections live. For us, it was always about the studio experience—the archaeology of it.”

After listening to a few songs from “Blue,” drummer Jimmy Cobb, the only surviving member of the “Kind of Blue” sextet, agreed. “These guys are proficient—I thought they were us at first—but I don’t hear the human part, the individual sound and feel I lived with on those sessions,” he said. “But, hey, classical has been doing this for centuries—playing the notes someone else wrote. If these guys took the time to do this, the music must mean something to them.”

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=993cc35d03) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=993cc35d03&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history – Philly.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://articles.philly.com/2014-10-05/news/54657549_1_camden-city-hall-music-recordings-sculpture

** Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history
————————————————————
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past.
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past. (RON TARVER / Staff Photographer)
GALLERY: A model of the proposed sculpture depicting a 40-foot-tall… (RON TARVER…) (http://www.philly.com/philly/gallery/20141005_Proposed_sculpture_for_Camden_waterfront_would_highlight_recording_history.html?viewGallery=y)

By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: October 05, 2014

Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago.

The lone reminder of the city’s crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to “his master’s voice.”

Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.

With the business’ purchase by RCA Victor Co., Camden also became the leader in developing radios and televisions.

Now, those early technological innovations are the focus of a proposed Camden waterfront sculpture – in aluminum – depicting a 40-foot-tall 78-r.p.m. record.

It would stand vertically and gracefully bend into a horizontal base with a timeline of the recording industry in the city.

The artwork – envisioned by sculptor and Camden native Carl LeVotch – would include holographic images of great artists who came to the city to record their music.

Called Rhapsody, it also would likely have audio features – accessed by cellphones close to the site – allowing visitors to hear the early recordings that put Camden on the map.

“I see the sculpture as a kind of sanctuary where people can reflect on music and the history of the industry in Camden,” said LeVotch, 65, of Haddon Township, who is seeking funding for the project. “The city was a mecca for music and known all over the world.”

“There are people with RCA Victor records with the name of Camden on the label,” he said. “This is the positive history of the city.”

LeVotch, who has created several bronze sculptures across the region, including one of Walt Whitman in Camden City Hall and boxer Joey Giardello in South Philadelphia, shared his latest proposal with Camden County Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr., who says he “would like to see the concept further explored.”

“Government entities are not in a position to help purchase land or build the project,” Cappelli said. “The best way to fund it is to seek private donors and corporate and foundation sponsors.”

Officials from the City of Camden and the Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, a nonprofit real estate development corporation based in the city, did not return calls.

As proposed, the sculpture would be on a three-quarter-acre lot near the waterfront, somewhere near the Nipper tower.

“It would be an icon in the city,” said Sam Sarin, owner of Victor’s Pub in the Victor building at 1 Market St. “This is where music recordings started. This is where they built Victrolas,” phonographs with the turntable and amplifying horn inside a cabinet.

“Maybe Camden should be looking at its past to find its future,” Sarin said.

The idea for the project came to LeVotch while taking an opera appreciation class, said the sculptor, who grew up at 35th and Federal Streets in Camden.

His teacher, Ennio Brugnolo, an Italian immigrant who teaches Italian at the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia and also sings with the Philadelphia Opera Company, had long wondered why Camden’s achievements were not marked in some significant way.

“When I first came to the country in 1970, I was all excited,” Brugnolo said. “I wanted to go to Philadelphia, then Camden to see RCA Victor.”

“But [in Camden] there’s nothing there to celebrate the history of the great singers that went through there,” he said. “You wouldn’t know the history that was made there. I was disappointed.”

————————————————————

ecolimore@phillynews.com (mailto:ecolimore@phillynews.com)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=6d3637ef67) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=6d3637ef67&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history – Philly.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://articles.philly.com/2014-10-05/news/54657549_1_camden-city-hall-music-recordings-sculpture

** Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history
————————————————————
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past.
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past. (RON TARVER / Staff Photographer)
GALLERY: A model of the proposed sculpture depicting a 40-foot-tall… (RON TARVER…) (http://www.philly.com/philly/gallery/20141005_Proposed_sculpture_for_Camden_waterfront_would_highlight_recording_history.html?viewGallery=y)

By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: October 05, 2014

Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago.

The lone reminder of the city’s crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to “his master’s voice.”

Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.

With the business’ purchase by RCA Victor Co., Camden also became the leader in developing radios and televisions.

Now, those early technological innovations are the focus of a proposed Camden waterfront sculpture – in aluminum – depicting a 40-foot-tall 78-r.p.m. record.

It would stand vertically and gracefully bend into a horizontal base with a timeline of the recording industry in the city.

The artwork – envisioned by sculptor and Camden native Carl LeVotch – would include holographic images of great artists who came to the city to record their music.

Called Rhapsody, it also would likely have audio features – accessed by cellphones close to the site – allowing visitors to hear the early recordings that put Camden on the map.

“I see the sculpture as a kind of sanctuary where people can reflect on music and the history of the industry in Camden,” said LeVotch, 65, of Haddon Township, who is seeking funding for the project. “The city was a mecca for music and known all over the world.”

“There are people with RCA Victor records with the name of Camden on the label,” he said. “This is the positive history of the city.”

LeVotch, who has created several bronze sculptures across the region, including one of Walt Whitman in Camden City Hall and boxer Joey Giardello in South Philadelphia, shared his latest proposal with Camden County Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr., who says he “would like to see the concept further explored.”

“Government entities are not in a position to help purchase land or build the project,” Cappelli said. “The best way to fund it is to seek private donors and corporate and foundation sponsors.”

Officials from the City of Camden and the Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, a nonprofit real estate development corporation based in the city, did not return calls.

As proposed, the sculpture would be on a three-quarter-acre lot near the waterfront, somewhere near the Nipper tower.

“It would be an icon in the city,” said Sam Sarin, owner of Victor’s Pub in the Victor building at 1 Market St. “This is where music recordings started. This is where they built Victrolas,” phonographs with the turntable and amplifying horn inside a cabinet.

“Maybe Camden should be looking at its past to find its future,” Sarin said.

The idea for the project came to LeVotch while taking an opera appreciation class, said the sculptor, who grew up at 35th and Federal Streets in Camden.

His teacher, Ennio Brugnolo, an Italian immigrant who teaches Italian at the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia and also sings with the Philadelphia Opera Company, had long wondered why Camden’s achievements were not marked in some significant way.

“When I first came to the country in 1970, I was all excited,” Brugnolo said. “I wanted to go to Philadelphia, then Camden to see RCA Victor.”

“But [in Camden] there’s nothing there to celebrate the history of the great singers that went through there,” he said. “You wouldn’t know the history that was made there. I was disappointed.”

————————————————————

ecolimore@phillynews.com (mailto:ecolimore@phillynews.com)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=6d3637ef67) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=6d3637ef67&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history – Philly.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://articles.philly.com/2014-10-05/news/54657549_1_camden-city-hall-music-recordings-sculpture

** Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history
————————————————————
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past.
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past. (RON TARVER / Staff Photographer)
GALLERY: A model of the proposed sculpture depicting a 40-foot-tall… (RON TARVER…) (http://www.philly.com/philly/gallery/20141005_Proposed_sculpture_for_Camden_waterfront_would_highlight_recording_history.html?viewGallery=y)

By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: October 05, 2014

Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago.

The lone reminder of the city’s crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to “his master’s voice.”

Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.

With the business’ purchase by RCA Victor Co., Camden also became the leader in developing radios and televisions.

Now, those early technological innovations are the focus of a proposed Camden waterfront sculpture – in aluminum – depicting a 40-foot-tall 78-r.p.m. record.

It would stand vertically and gracefully bend into a horizontal base with a timeline of the recording industry in the city.

The artwork – envisioned by sculptor and Camden native Carl LeVotch – would include holographic images of great artists who came to the city to record their music.

Called Rhapsody, it also would likely have audio features – accessed by cellphones close to the site – allowing visitors to hear the early recordings that put Camden on the map.

“I see the sculpture as a kind of sanctuary where people can reflect on music and the history of the industry in Camden,” said LeVotch, 65, of Haddon Township, who is seeking funding for the project. “The city was a mecca for music and known all over the world.”

“There are people with RCA Victor records with the name of Camden on the label,” he said. “This is the positive history of the city.”

LeVotch, who has created several bronze sculptures across the region, including one of Walt Whitman in Camden City Hall and boxer Joey Giardello in South Philadelphia, shared his latest proposal with Camden County Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr., who says he “would like to see the concept further explored.”

“Government entities are not in a position to help purchase land or build the project,” Cappelli said. “The best way to fund it is to seek private donors and corporate and foundation sponsors.”

Officials from the City of Camden and the Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, a nonprofit real estate development corporation based in the city, did not return calls.

As proposed, the sculpture would be on a three-quarter-acre lot near the waterfront, somewhere near the Nipper tower.

“It would be an icon in the city,” said Sam Sarin, owner of Victor’s Pub in the Victor building at 1 Market St. “This is where music recordings started. This is where they built Victrolas,” phonographs with the turntable and amplifying horn inside a cabinet.

“Maybe Camden should be looking at its past to find its future,” Sarin said.

The idea for the project came to LeVotch while taking an opera appreciation class, said the sculptor, who grew up at 35th and Federal Streets in Camden.

His teacher, Ennio Brugnolo, an Italian immigrant who teaches Italian at the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia and also sings with the Philadelphia Opera Company, had long wondered why Camden’s achievements were not marked in some significant way.

“When I first came to the country in 1970, I was all excited,” Brugnolo said. “I wanted to go to Philadelphia, then Camden to see RCA Victor.”

“But [in Camden] there’s nothing there to celebrate the history of the great singers that went through there,” he said. “You wouldn’t know the history that was made there. I was disappointed.”

————————————————————

ecolimore@phillynews.com (mailto:ecolimore@phillynews.com)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=6d3637ef67) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=6d3637ef67&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history – Philly.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://articles.philly.com/2014-10-05/news/54657549_1_camden-city-hall-music-recordings-sculpture

** Proposed sculpture for Camden waterfront would highlight recording history
————————————————————
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past.
Carl LeVotch with a model of his sculpture depicting a 78-r.p.m. record to honor Camden’s past. (RON TARVER / Staff Photographer)
GALLERY: A model of the proposed sculpture depicting a 40-foot-tall… (RON TARVER…) (http://www.philly.com/philly/gallery/20141005_Proposed_sculpture_for_Camden_waterfront_would_highlight_recording_history.html?viewGallery=y)

By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: October 05, 2014

Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago.

The lone reminder of the city’s crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to “his master’s voice.”

Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.

With the business’ purchase by RCA Victor Co., Camden also became the leader in developing radios and televisions.

Now, those early technological innovations are the focus of a proposed Camden waterfront sculpture – in aluminum – depicting a 40-foot-tall 78-r.p.m. record.

It would stand vertically and gracefully bend into a horizontal base with a timeline of the recording industry in the city.

The artwork – envisioned by sculptor and Camden native Carl LeVotch – would include holographic images of great artists who came to the city to record their music.

Called Rhapsody, it also would likely have audio features – accessed by cellphones close to the site – allowing visitors to hear the early recordings that put Camden on the map.

“I see the sculpture as a kind of sanctuary where people can reflect on music and the history of the industry in Camden,” said LeVotch, 65, of Haddon Township, who is seeking funding for the project. “The city was a mecca for music and known all over the world.”

“There are people with RCA Victor records with the name of Camden on the label,” he said. “This is the positive history of the city.”

LeVotch, who has created several bronze sculptures across the region, including one of Walt Whitman in Camden City Hall and boxer Joey Giardello in South Philadelphia, shared his latest proposal with Camden County Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr., who says he “would like to see the concept further explored.”

“Government entities are not in a position to help purchase land or build the project,” Cappelli said. “The best way to fund it is to seek private donors and corporate and foundation sponsors.”

Officials from the City of Camden and the Cooper’s Ferry Partnership, a nonprofit real estate development corporation based in the city, did not return calls.

As proposed, the sculpture would be on a three-quarter-acre lot near the waterfront, somewhere near the Nipper tower.

“It would be an icon in the city,” said Sam Sarin, owner of Victor’s Pub in the Victor building at 1 Market St. “This is where music recordings started. This is where they built Victrolas,” phonographs with the turntable and amplifying horn inside a cabinet.

“Maybe Camden should be looking at its past to find its future,” Sarin said.

The idea for the project came to LeVotch while taking an opera appreciation class, said the sculptor, who grew up at 35th and Federal Streets in Camden.

His teacher, Ennio Brugnolo, an Italian immigrant who teaches Italian at the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia and also sings with the Philadelphia Opera Company, had long wondered why Camden’s achievements were not marked in some significant way.

“When I first came to the country in 1970, I was all excited,” Brugnolo said. “I wanted to go to Philadelphia, then Camden to see RCA Victor.”

“But [in Camden] there’s nothing there to celebrate the history of the great singers that went through there,” he said. “You wouldn’t know the history that was made there. I was disappointed.”

————————————————————

ecolimore@phillynews.com (mailto:ecolimore@phillynews.com)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=6d3637ef67) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=6d3637ef67&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

▶ JC Heard Orchestra 7-16-1988 – YouTube

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5HZlq3cHqc

Park Concert at Oakland Community College
Trumpets: Marcus Belgrave, Walt Szymansky, Jon-Erik Kellso
Trombones: Steve Hunter, Dan McAllister, Micheal Pashenee
Saxes: Scott Petersen, Russ Miller, Chris Pitts, Mark Berger
Rhythm: Earl Van Riper piano, JC Heard drums, Mike Grace bass
Nica’s Dream solos: Scott Petersen 1:51 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 3:50 (https://www.youtube.com/#) JC 5:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Coasting with JC 8:15 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos: Walt Szymansky 9:10 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Scott Petersen 10:40 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Big Dipper 15:10 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Earl Van Riper: 15:20 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 16:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Dan McAllister 18:07 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Chris Pitts 20:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Blues for Sale 23:50 (https://www.youtube.com/#) sax soli 25:51 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
For You my Love 28:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Mark Berger 29:20 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Dan McAllister 29:53 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Jon-Erik Kellso 30:18 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Round Midnight 33:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Earl Van Riper 35:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Russ Miller 38:11 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 39:35 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Yardbird Suite 41:40 (https://www.youtube.com/#) sax soli 42:26 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Dan McAllister 43:06 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Steve Hunter 43:41 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Micheal Pashenee 44:17 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Note: some audio problems

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=dcd535f36c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=dcd535f36c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

▶ JC Heard Orchestra 7-16-1988 – YouTube

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5HZlq3cHqc

Park Concert at Oakland Community College
Trumpets: Marcus Belgrave, Walt Szymansky, Jon-Erik Kellso
Trombones: Steve Hunter, Dan McAllister, Micheal Pashenee
Saxes: Scott Petersen, Russ Miller, Chris Pitts, Mark Berger
Rhythm: Earl Van Riper piano, JC Heard drums, Mike Grace bass
Nica’s Dream solos: Scott Petersen 1:51 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 3:50 (https://www.youtube.com/#) JC 5:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Coasting with JC 8:15 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos: Walt Szymansky 9:10 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Scott Petersen 10:40 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Big Dipper 15:10 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Earl Van Riper: 15:20 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 16:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Dan McAllister 18:07 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Chris Pitts 20:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Blues for Sale 23:50 (https://www.youtube.com/#) sax soli 25:51 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
For You my Love 28:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Mark Berger 29:20 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Dan McAllister 29:53 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Jon-Erik Kellso 30:18 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Round Midnight 33:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Earl Van Riper 35:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Russ Miller 38:11 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 39:35 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Yardbird Suite 41:40 (https://www.youtube.com/#) sax soli 42:26 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Dan McAllister 43:06 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Steve Hunter 43:41 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Micheal Pashenee 44:17 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Note: some audio problems

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=dcd535f36c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=dcd535f36c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

▶ JC Heard Orchestra 7-16-1988 – YouTube

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5HZlq3cHqc

Park Concert at Oakland Community College
Trumpets: Marcus Belgrave, Walt Szymansky, Jon-Erik Kellso
Trombones: Steve Hunter, Dan McAllister, Micheal Pashenee
Saxes: Scott Petersen, Russ Miller, Chris Pitts, Mark Berger
Rhythm: Earl Van Riper piano, JC Heard drums, Mike Grace bass
Nica’s Dream solos: Scott Petersen 1:51 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 3:50 (https://www.youtube.com/#) JC 5:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Coasting with JC 8:15 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos: Walt Szymansky 9:10 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Scott Petersen 10:40 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Big Dipper 15:10 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Earl Van Riper: 15:20 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 16:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Dan McAllister 18:07 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Chris Pitts 20:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Blues for Sale 23:50 (https://www.youtube.com/#) sax soli 25:51 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
For You my Love 28:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Mark Berger 29:20 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Dan McAllister 29:53 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Jon-Erik Kellso 30:18 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Round Midnight 33:00 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Earl Van Riper 35:44 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Russ Miller 38:11 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Marcus Belgrave 39:35 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Yardbird Suite 41:40 (https://www.youtube.com/#) sax soli 42:26 (https://www.youtube.com/#) solos Dan McAllister 43:06 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Steve Hunter 43:41 (https://www.youtube.com/#) Micheal Pashenee 44:17 (https://www.youtube.com/#)
Note: some audio problems

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=dcd535f36c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=dcd535f36c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Filmmaker Seeks to Show a Softer Side of Capone – Jefferson Park – DNAinfo.com Chicago

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20141006/jefferson-park/filmmaker-seeks-show-softer-side-of-capone

** Filmmaker Seeks to Show a Softer Side of Capone
————————————————————

Filmmaker Richard Larsen is producing a movie showcasing Al Capone and his love of jazz. On Saturday at the Copernicus Center, Larsen hosted the Gangster Convention, seeking extras for the film.
Capone and Jazz

JEFFERSON PARK — While Al Capone is known for being a notorious gangster synonymous with organized crime in Chicago during Prohibition, the man had redeemable qualities, too.

At least that’s the thinking behind the documentary film Richard Larsen is producing: “Capone’s Treasure of the Heart.”

“Every [Capone] film has been about the same rat-a-tat-tat murder stuff,” said Larsen, who has been running a fan website (http://caponefanclub.com/) for 4½ years. “We know about it. We’ve seen it a million times. But he was much more than a merciless killer.”

Heather Cherone says the Northwest Side may have been farmland in the ’20s, but residents still got into the Prohibition spirit:

The film was born out of Larsen’s desire to showcase Capone’s contribution to jazz music, rather than his criminal legacy. Larsen said he’s spent 18 years researching Capone.

“I’m talking about Nat King Cole, Louis Armstrong, you read their autobiographies and they give due credit [to Capone] for helping to launch their careers,” said Larsen, who currently lives in Arlington Heights but spent years living in Rogers Park, among other city neighborhoods.

“They were playing for nickels and dimes and being abused in the Southern states. Al Capone brought them up to Chicago and asked them to play in his speakeasies and they developed their careers” there.

Larsen enlisted Robert McCrea, author of the 2006 film “Find Me Guilty (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0419749/) ,” to write the screenplay.

With the help of local musicians dressed in 1920s garb and director Ron Karpman, Larsen filmed the first scene of the film Sunday at an event he designed partially to help draw actors: the inaugural Gangster Convention (http://www.caponeconvention.com/gangster-convention.html) .

Only about 10 people wearing ’20s garb showed up to the event held at Copernicus Center, 5216 W. Lawrence Ave., which Larsen admitted was not what he had hoped for.

But they were still able to film a performance of the song “Madonna Mia,” (http://www.caponeconvention.com/madonna-mia-song.html) a song Capone wrote for his wife, Mae, during his prison sentence in Alcatraz.

Capone gave the sheet music to a priest he befriended while he was in prison, Larsen said. In the 1980s, the priest died and left the sheet music to his son, who sent Larsen a copy several years later.

“He had a good heart,” Larsen said of Capone.

Larsen isn’t the first to attempt to shine a different light on Capone. People claiming Capone lineage starred in a Reelz channel reality show that aired this year called “The Capones.” Another Capone descendent celebrated her uncle at an event (http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20121206/old-town/deirdre-capone-explains-uncle-als-whiskey-drink-at-prohibition-event) put on by the Chicago History Museum last year.

Larsen that there are several examples of Capone’s influence on jazz music, which he intends to showcase in the movie.

One of them involved legendary jazz bassist Milt Hinton (http://www.milthinton.com/) .

In the 1920s, Hinton, who had been playing in Capone’s speakeasies, was in a car accident on the South Side. Capone rushed to the hospital, Larsen said, only to find that Hinton had severely injured his index finger, the one he uses to pluck his bass.

“That finger was so injured that the doctors wanted to amputate it,” Larsen said. Al Capone insisted that they do whatever they could to fix that finger. Not too many people are going to argue with Al Capone, so they indeed stitched up the index finger of Milt Hilton. He went on to be very successful in the jazz world.”

In addition to filming the performance of “Madonna Mia” Sunday, authors of books detailing untold stories of gangsters set up booths at the event.

The film will premiere Valentine’s Day 2015, Larsen said.

For more neighborhood news, listen to DNAinfo Radio here:

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=205dc57b92) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=205dc57b92&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Filmmaker Seeks to Show a Softer Side of Capone – Jefferson Park – DNAinfo.com Chicago

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20141006/jefferson-park/filmmaker-seeks-show-softer-side-of-capone

** Filmmaker Seeks to Show a Softer Side of Capone
————————————————————

Filmmaker Richard Larsen is producing a movie showcasing Al Capone and his love of jazz. On Saturday at the Copernicus Center, Larsen hosted the Gangster Convention, seeking extras for the film.
Capone and Jazz

JEFFERSON PARK — While Al Capone is known for being a notorious gangster synonymous with organized crime in Chicago during Prohibition, the man had redeemable qualities, too.

At least that’s the thinking behind the documentary film Richard Larsen is producing: “Capone’s Treasure of the Heart.”

“Every [Capone] film has been about the same rat-a-tat-tat murder stuff,” said Larsen, who has been running a fan website (http://caponefanclub.com/) for 4½ years. “We know about it. We’ve seen it a million times. But he was much more than a merciless killer.”

Heather Cherone says the Northwest Side may have been farmland in the ’20s, but residents still got into the Prohibition spirit:

The film was born out of Larsen’s desire to showcase Capone’s contribution to jazz music, rather than his criminal legacy. Larsen said he’s spent 18 years researching Capone.

“I’m talking about Nat King Cole, Louis Armstrong, you read their autobiographies and they give due credit [to Capone] for helping to launch their careers,” said Larsen, who currently lives in Arlington Heights but spent years living in Rogers Park, among other city neighborhoods.

“They were playing for nickels and dimes and being abused in the Southern states. Al Capone brought them up to Chicago and asked them to play in his speakeasies and they developed their careers” there.

Larsen enlisted Robert McCrea, author of the 2006 film “Find Me Guilty (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0419749/) ,” to write the screenplay.

With the help of local musicians dressed in 1920s garb and director Ron Karpman, Larsen filmed the first scene of the film Sunday at an event he designed partially to help draw actors: the inaugural Gangster Convention (http://www.caponeconvention.com/gangster-convention.html) .

Only about 10 people wearing ’20s garb showed up to the event held at Copernicus Center, 5216 W. Lawrence Ave., which Larsen admitted was not what he had hoped for.

But they were still able to film a performance of the song “Madonna Mia,” (http://www.caponeconvention.com/madonna-mia-song.html) a song Capone wrote for his wife, Mae, during his prison sentence in Alcatraz.

Capone gave the sheet music to a priest he befriended while he was in prison, Larsen said. In the 1980s, the priest died and left the sheet music to his son, who sent Larsen a copy several years later.

“He had a good heart,” Larsen said of Capone.

Larsen isn’t the first to attempt to shine a different light on Capone. People claiming Capone lineage starred in a Reelz channel reality show that aired this year called “The Capones.” Another Capone descendent celebrated her uncle at an event (http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20121206/old-town/deirdre-capone-explains-uncle-als-whiskey-drink-at-prohibition-event) put on by the Chicago History Museum last year.

Larsen that there are several examples of Capone’s influence on jazz music, which he intends to showcase in the movie.

One of them involved legendary jazz bassist Milt Hinton (http://www.milthinton.com/) .

In the 1920s, Hinton, who had been playing in Capone’s speakeasies, was in a car accident on the South Side. Capone rushed to the hospital, Larsen said, only to find that Hinton had severely injured his index finger, the one he uses to pluck his bass.

“That finger was so injured that the doctors wanted to amputate it,” Larsen said. Al Capone insisted that they do whatever they could to fix that finger. Not too many people are going to argue with Al Capone, so they indeed stitched up the index finger of Milt Hilton. He went on to be very successful in the jazz world.”

In addition to filming the performance of “Madonna Mia” Sunday, authors of books detailing untold stories of gangsters set up booths at the event.

The film will premiere Valentine’s Day 2015, Larsen said.

For more neighborhood news, listen to DNAinfo Radio here:

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=205dc57b92) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=205dc57b92&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Filmmaker Seeks to Show a Softer Side of Capone – Jefferson Park – DNAinfo.com Chicago

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20141006/jefferson-park/filmmaker-seeks-show-softer-side-of-capone

** Filmmaker Seeks to Show a Softer Side of Capone
————————————————————

Filmmaker Richard Larsen is producing a movie showcasing Al Capone and his love of jazz. On Saturday at the Copernicus Center, Larsen hosted the Gangster Convention, seeking extras for the film.
Capone and Jazz

JEFFERSON PARK — While Al Capone is known for being a notorious gangster synonymous with organized crime in Chicago during Prohibition, the man had redeemable qualities, too.

At least that’s the thinking behind the documentary film Richard Larsen is producing: “Capone’s Treasure of the Heart.”

“Every [Capone] film has been about the same rat-a-tat-tat murder stuff,” said Larsen, who has been running a fan website (http://caponefanclub.com/) for 4½ years. “We know about it. We’ve seen it a million times. But he was much more than a merciless killer.”

Heather Cherone says the Northwest Side may have been farmland in the ’20s, but residents still got into the Prohibition spirit:

The film was born out of Larsen’s desire to showcase Capone’s contribution to jazz music, rather than his criminal legacy. Larsen said he’s spent 18 years researching Capone.

“I’m talking about Nat King Cole, Louis Armstrong, you read their autobiographies and they give due credit [to Capone] for helping to launch their careers,” said Larsen, who currently lives in Arlington Heights but spent years living in Rogers Park, among other city neighborhoods.

“They were playing for nickels and dimes and being abused in the Southern states. Al Capone brought them up to Chicago and asked them to play in his speakeasies and they developed their careers” there.

Larsen enlisted Robert McCrea, author of the 2006 film “Find Me Guilty (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0419749/) ,” to write the screenplay.

With the help of local musicians dressed in 1920s garb and director Ron Karpman, Larsen filmed the first scene of the film Sunday at an event he designed partially to help draw actors: the inaugural Gangster Convention (http://www.caponeconvention.com/gangster-convention.html) .

Only about 10 people wearing ’20s garb showed up to the event held at Copernicus Center, 5216 W. Lawrence Ave., which Larsen admitted was not what he had hoped for.

But they were still able to film a performance of the song “Madonna Mia,” (http://www.caponeconvention.com/madonna-mia-song.html) a song Capone wrote for his wife, Mae, during his prison sentence in Alcatraz.

Capone gave the sheet music to a priest he befriended while he was in prison, Larsen said. In the 1980s, the priest died and left the sheet music to his son, who sent Larsen a copy several years later.

“He had a good heart,” Larsen said of Capone.

Larsen isn’t the first to attempt to shine a different light on Capone. People claiming Capone lineage starred in a Reelz channel reality show that aired this year called “The Capones.” Another Capone descendent celebrated her uncle at an event (http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20121206/old-town/deirdre-capone-explains-uncle-als-whiskey-drink-at-prohibition-event) put on by the Chicago History Museum last year.

Larsen that there are several examples of Capone’s influence on jazz music, which he intends to showcase in the movie.

One of them involved legendary jazz bassist Milt Hinton (http://www.milthinton.com/) .

In the 1920s, Hinton, who had been playing in Capone’s speakeasies, was in a car accident on the South Side. Capone rushed to the hospital, Larsen said, only to find that Hinton had severely injured his index finger, the one he uses to pluck his bass.

“That finger was so injured that the doctors wanted to amputate it,” Larsen said. Al Capone insisted that they do whatever they could to fix that finger. Not too many people are going to argue with Al Capone, so they indeed stitched up the index finger of Milt Hilton. He went on to be very successful in the jazz world.”

In addition to filming the performance of “Madonna Mia” Sunday, authors of books detailing untold stories of gangsters set up booths at the event.

The film will premiere Valentine’s Day 2015, Larsen said.

For more neighborhood news, listen to DNAinfo Radio here:

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=205dc57b92) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=205dc57b92&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

George M. Roberts, ‘Mr. Bass Trombone,’ Dies at 86

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455

** George M. Roberts, ‘Mr. Bass Trombone,’ Dies at 86
————————————————————
5:59 PM PST 10/01/2014 by Mike Barnes
* 2
* 114
* 0
* 1
* 0
* Email (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455#)
*
* Comments (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455#comments)

Getty Images

** He recorded for Nelson Riddle, Frank Sinatra, Stan Kenton and John Williams and can be heard on the soundtrack for ‘Jaws’
————————————————————

George M. Roberts, the master musician known as “Mr. Bass Trombone” whose melodic sound can be heard on Nelson Riddle-arranged albums for Frank Sinatraand Dean Martin, has died. He was 86.

After a long battle with multiple sclerosis, Roberts died Saturday of complications from pneumonia in Fallbrook, California, the International Trombone Association announced (https://www.trombone.net/news/news.cfm?ID=1801) .

Roberts’ skillful and innovative playing made him a much-in-demand session player in Los Angeles from the 1950s through the ’80s. In 2005, he estimated that he had played on more than 6,000 recordings, spanning a half-century.

Riddle, who was under contract at Capitol Records as a staff arranger in the ’50s, used Roberts for albums recorded by the likes of Sinatra, Martin, Nat “King” Cole and Ella Fitzgerald, and he helped to define the orchestrator’s signature swingin’ sound.

For Billy May’s 1958 album Big Fat Brass, May saluted the Riddle-Roberts connection by writing a bass trombone feature that Roberts performed on “Solving the Riddle.”

In 1959 and 1960, the trombonist recorded two bouncy albums of his own, Meet Mr. Roberts and Bottoms Up (1960), for Columbia Records. John Williams served as the arranger and pianist on the second album, and Roberts would go on to work for the eventual five-time Oscar winner on such films as Jaws (1975) and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

Roberts played in the orchestras for The Rosemary Clooney Show, The Dinah Shore Show, The Academy Awards and for President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural ceremony in 1961, and worked with Lalo Schifrin (Mission: Impossible, Mannix) as well.

George Mortimer Roberts was born March 22, 1928, in Des Moines, Iowa. His brother played the baritone saxophone in the junior high school band, but Roberts was smitten with another instrument, the one “that went back and forth,” he said in a 2005 interview.

However, the band director said Roberts’ arms were not long enough to play the trombone and suggested he take up the clarinet. He tried and wasn’t happy with that, but was elated when his parents bought him a new Super Olds trombone.

After serving in the U.S. Navy, Roberts studied at the American Operatic Lab in Los Angeles, then landed a gig with Gene Krupa’s band, where he switched from lead trombone to bass after realizing he couldn’t compete with Urbie Green. He worked with Stan Kenton’s band through 1953, then made his mark as a freelance session player.

He was involved with the International Trombone Association for many years and served as the namesake for the George Roberts Bass Trombone Competition.

Twitter: @mikebarnes4 (http://twitter.com/mikebarnes4)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=518effb50c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=518effb50c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

George M. Roberts, ‘Mr. Bass Trombone,’ Dies at 86

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455

** George M. Roberts, ‘Mr. Bass Trombone,’ Dies at 86
————————————————————
5:59 PM PST 10/01/2014 by Mike Barnes
* 2
* 114
* 0
* 1
* 0
* Email (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455#)
*
* Comments (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455#comments)

Getty Images

** He recorded for Nelson Riddle, Frank Sinatra, Stan Kenton and John Williams and can be heard on the soundtrack for ‘Jaws’
————————————————————

George M. Roberts, the master musician known as “Mr. Bass Trombone” whose melodic sound can be heard on Nelson Riddle-arranged albums for Frank Sinatraand Dean Martin, has died. He was 86.

After a long battle with multiple sclerosis, Roberts died Saturday of complications from pneumonia in Fallbrook, California, the International Trombone Association announced (https://www.trombone.net/news/news.cfm?ID=1801) .

Roberts’ skillful and innovative playing made him a much-in-demand session player in Los Angeles from the 1950s through the ’80s. In 2005, he estimated that he had played on more than 6,000 recordings, spanning a half-century.

Riddle, who was under contract at Capitol Records as a staff arranger in the ’50s, used Roberts for albums recorded by the likes of Sinatra, Martin, Nat “King” Cole and Ella Fitzgerald, and he helped to define the orchestrator’s signature swingin’ sound.

For Billy May’s 1958 album Big Fat Brass, May saluted the Riddle-Roberts connection by writing a bass trombone feature that Roberts performed on “Solving the Riddle.”

In 1959 and 1960, the trombonist recorded two bouncy albums of his own, Meet Mr. Roberts and Bottoms Up (1960), for Columbia Records. John Williams served as the arranger and pianist on the second album, and Roberts would go on to work for the eventual five-time Oscar winner on such films as Jaws (1975) and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

Roberts played in the orchestras for The Rosemary Clooney Show, The Dinah Shore Show, The Academy Awards and for President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural ceremony in 1961, and worked with Lalo Schifrin (Mission: Impossible, Mannix) as well.

George Mortimer Roberts was born March 22, 1928, in Des Moines, Iowa. His brother played the baritone saxophone in the junior high school band, but Roberts was smitten with another instrument, the one “that went back and forth,” he said in a 2005 interview.

However, the band director said Roberts’ arms were not long enough to play the trombone and suggested he take up the clarinet. He tried and wasn’t happy with that, but was elated when his parents bought him a new Super Olds trombone.

After serving in the U.S. Navy, Roberts studied at the American Operatic Lab in Los Angeles, then landed a gig with Gene Krupa’s band, where he switched from lead trombone to bass after realizing he couldn’t compete with Urbie Green. He worked with Stan Kenton’s band through 1953, then made his mark as a freelance session player.

He was involved with the International Trombone Association for many years and served as the namesake for the George Roberts Bass Trombone Competition.

Twitter: @mikebarnes4 (http://twitter.com/mikebarnes4)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=518effb50c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=518effb50c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

George M. Roberts, ‘Mr. Bass Trombone,’ Dies at 86

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455

** George M. Roberts, ‘Mr. Bass Trombone,’ Dies at 86
————————————————————
5:59 PM PST 10/01/2014 by Mike Barnes
* 2
* 114
* 0
* 1
* 0
* Email (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455#)
*
* Comments (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-m-roberts-dead-mr-737455#comments)

Getty Images

** He recorded for Nelson Riddle, Frank Sinatra, Stan Kenton and John Williams and can be heard on the soundtrack for ‘Jaws’
————————————————————

George M. Roberts, the master musician known as “Mr. Bass Trombone” whose melodic sound can be heard on Nelson Riddle-arranged albums for Frank Sinatraand Dean Martin, has died. He was 86.

After a long battle with multiple sclerosis, Roberts died Saturday of complications from pneumonia in Fallbrook, California, the International Trombone Association announced (https://www.trombone.net/news/news.cfm?ID=1801) .

Roberts’ skillful and innovative playing made him a much-in-demand session player in Los Angeles from the 1950s through the ’80s. In 2005, he estimated that he had played on more than 6,000 recordings, spanning a half-century.

Riddle, who was under contract at Capitol Records as a staff arranger in the ’50s, used Roberts for albums recorded by the likes of Sinatra, Martin, Nat “King” Cole and Ella Fitzgerald, and he helped to define the orchestrator’s signature swingin’ sound.

For Billy May’s 1958 album Big Fat Brass, May saluted the Riddle-Roberts connection by writing a bass trombone feature that Roberts performed on “Solving the Riddle.”

In 1959 and 1960, the trombonist recorded two bouncy albums of his own, Meet Mr. Roberts and Bottoms Up (1960), for Columbia Records. John Williams served as the arranger and pianist on the second album, and Roberts would go on to work for the eventual five-time Oscar winner on such films as Jaws (1975) and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

Roberts played in the orchestras for The Rosemary Clooney Show, The Dinah Shore Show, The Academy Awards and for President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural ceremony in 1961, and worked with Lalo Schifrin (Mission: Impossible, Mannix) as well.

George Mortimer Roberts was born March 22, 1928, in Des Moines, Iowa. His brother played the baritone saxophone in the junior high school band, but Roberts was smitten with another instrument, the one “that went back and forth,” he said in a 2005 interview.

However, the band director said Roberts’ arms were not long enough to play the trombone and suggested he take up the clarinet. He tried and wasn’t happy with that, but was elated when his parents bought him a new Super Olds trombone.

After serving in the U.S. Navy, Roberts studied at the American Operatic Lab in Los Angeles, then landed a gig with Gene Krupa’s band, where he switched from lead trombone to bass after realizing he couldn’t compete with Urbie Green. He worked with Stan Kenton’s band through 1953, then made his mark as a freelance session player.

He was involved with the International Trombone Association for many years and served as the namesake for the George Roberts Bass Trombone Competition.

Twitter: @mikebarnes4 (http://twitter.com/mikebarnes4)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=518effb50c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=518effb50c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

LOVE, WISDOM, AND GREASE: “KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON”

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/author/jazzlives/

** LOVE, WISDOM, AND GREASE: “KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON” (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/2014/10/04/love-wisdom-and-grease-keep-on-keepin-on/)
————————————————————
by jazzlives (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/author/jazzlives/)

I was reluctant to watch the new documentary, KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON, about the relationship between aging jazz master Clark Terry (now 94) and his young protege Justin Kauflin (now 26). Years ago, Cee Tee told audiences — frequently and loudly — “The Golden Years SUCK!” and what I knew of his medical woes, diabetes culminating in loss of sight, and the amputation of both legs, had left me unwilling to watch a film chronicling the physical decline of a great artist.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ct-poster.jpg

I now know that this moving documentary is so much more than a chronicle of the physical breakdown of a once-vibrant man. I came away from the film uplifted by Clark’s indomitable love and spiritual energy, a bubbling life-force that cannot be stifled.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ct.jpg

But this is not only a film about Clark Terry. And although there is a good deal of rewarding archival footage (younger Clark with Ellington, Basie, and Quincy Jones) it is not a memorial to him.

Rather, it is about a mutual exchange between Terry and the young, inventive jazz pianist Kauflin who becomes Terry’s student — but at the same time sustains the older man, energizes him, and since Terry was losing his sight, develops into a valuable guide into that other world. (Kauflin lost his sight completely at 11.)

Cee Tee is able to teach the younger man valuable life-lessons about more than music, but Justin returns the favor generously, becoming a son both Terry and his wife can nurture. The film deftly and tenderly chronicles their relationship, not neglecting the sorrows along the way: Terry has immense medical setbacks; Kauflin is a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk competition but other pianists make it to the finals.

At the end of this beautifully photographed and edited film, there have been triumphs. In Kauflin’s case, he has impressed Dianne Reeves and Quincy Jones, so much so in the latter’s case that Jones has featured the young musician at the Montreux Jazz Festival and has asked him to be part of his next CD. For Terry, the triumphs are enacted on a smaller scale but are no less important. He keeps on, and it is not simply a matter of not dying. In the last minutes of the film, we see him instructing a young saxophonist in how best to phrase a flurry of notes. We leave the film with faith in Terry as a beacon of love and music — and we know that the young men and women he has taught and inspired will go on to inspire generations not yet born.

The film is full of delights: Terry’s instructing Kauflin in “old songs” such as BREEZE, talking with him about Ellington, and helping Kauflin become not only a better pianist but a more courageous young man. We see Terry’s generous spirit and the loving relationship he and wife Gwen have and sustain, and we understand more about Clark because of brief interviews with Herbie Hancock, Jones, and even an archival clip from Miles Davis. The film also lets young Kauflin have his say, and he comes across as self-aware, charming, and gracious, very much aware of his debt to his mentor.

Because the film’s director, Alan Hicks, was also a student of Terry’s, the film is lit from within by a rare sensitivity. It does not view the world of jazz superficially and erroneously from the outside. The film never seems maudlin or overdone, and critical audiences searching for errors won’t find them. And the musicians who praise Clark seem so fresh, their voices so authentic.

What any audience will find in this compact film (84 minutes) is love: passing generously between Cee Tee and his fellow musicians, to and from Justin, Gwen, and the characters who are fortunate to be in this aura. There’s also Justin’s frisky but loving guide dog, Candy (whose name provokes an impromptu Terry vocal on that Forties ballad).

The film offers a model for a sustaining spiritual exchange, where an Elder of the Tribe, honored and respected, has wisdom to pass on to the Youngbloods. And we can all learn from Terry. That Kauflin has done so with such easy openness is a testament to his heartfelt nature — Elders need Youngbloods to inspire. Hicks has returned his love to Terry through this film, which took five years to complete.

I urge you to seek out and watch KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON. As a document of affectionate mutual generosity and swinging music, it will inspire you. Here (https://www.facebook.com/keepinonfilm) is the film’s Facebook page, and here (http://youtu.be/kjR74w_GFWE%20) is a brief trailer.

Because for all its sad events, the film is light of heart, I have to conclude with something in that spirit. I now have a new catchphrase (although I might be reluctant to use it). Terry taught a very young Quincy Jones, who has never forgotten his mentor’s the kindness. They greet each other with a trumpeters’ in-joke: “Are your lips greasy?” meaning “Are you still playing? Are you still making the effort?” I’d like to see that cheerful phrase (puzzling to those not in the know) become part of any conversation.

May your happiness increase!

From: The Well-Tempered Ear
Reply-To: JAZZ LIVES

==============================================
PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Unsubscribe <<Email Address>> from this list:
http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=953c10744b

Our mailing address is:
Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

Our telephone:
845-986-1677

Forward this email to a friend:
http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=953c10744b&e=[UNIQID]

Update your profile:
http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]

slide

LOVE, WISDOM, AND GREASE: “KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON”

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/author/jazzlives/

** LOVE, WISDOM, AND GREASE: “KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON” (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/2014/10/04/love-wisdom-and-grease-keep-on-keepin-on/)
————————————————————
by jazzlives (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/author/jazzlives/)

I was reluctant to watch the new documentary, KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON, about the relationship between aging jazz master Clark Terry (now 94) and his young protege Justin Kauflin (now 26). Years ago, Cee Tee told audiences — frequently and loudly — “The Golden Years SUCK!” and what I knew of his medical woes, diabetes culminating in loss of sight, and the amputation of both legs, had left me unwilling to watch a film chronicling the physical decline of a great artist.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ct-poster.jpg

I now know that this moving documentary is so much more than a chronicle of the physical breakdown of a once-vibrant man. I came away from the film uplifted by Clark’s indomitable love and spiritual energy, a bubbling life-force that cannot be stifled.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ct.jpg

But this is not only a film about Clark Terry. And although there is a good deal of rewarding archival footage (younger Clark with Ellington, Basie, and Quincy Jones) it is not a memorial to him.

Rather, it is about a mutual exchange between Terry and the young, inventive jazz pianist Kauflin who becomes Terry’s student — but at the same time sustains the older man, energizes him, and since Terry was losing his sight, develops into a valuable guide into that other world. (Kauflin lost his sight completely at 11.)

Cee Tee is able to teach the younger man valuable life-lessons about more than music, but Justin returns the favor generously, becoming a son both Terry and his wife can nurture. The film deftly and tenderly chronicles their relationship, not neglecting the sorrows along the way: Terry has immense medical setbacks; Kauflin is a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk competition but other pianists make it to the finals.

At the end of this beautifully photographed and edited film, there have been triumphs. In Kauflin’s case, he has impressed Dianne Reeves and Quincy Jones, so much so in the latter’s case that Jones has featured the young musician at the Montreux Jazz Festival and has asked him to be part of his next CD. For Terry, the triumphs are enacted on a smaller scale but are no less important. He keeps on, and it is not simply a matter of not dying. In the last minutes of the film, we see him instructing a young saxophonist in how best to phrase a flurry of notes. We leave the film with faith in Terry as a beacon of love and music — and we know that the young men and women he has taught and inspired will go on to inspire generations not yet born.

The film is full of delights: Terry’s instructing Kauflin in “old songs” such as BREEZE, talking with him about Ellington, and helping Kauflin become not only a better pianist but a more courageous young man. We see Terry’s generous spirit and the loving relationship he and wife Gwen have and sustain, and we understand more about Clark because of brief interviews with Herbie Hancock, Jones, and even an archival clip from Miles Davis. The film also lets young Kauflin have his say, and he comes across as self-aware, charming, and gracious, very much aware of his debt to his mentor.

Because the film’s director, Alan Hicks, was also a student of Terry’s, the film is lit from within by a rare sensitivity. It does not view the world of jazz superficially and erroneously from the outside. The film never seems maudlin or overdone, and critical audiences searching for errors won’t find them. And the musicians who praise Clark seem so fresh, their voices so authentic.

What any audience will find in this compact film (84 minutes) is love: passing generously between Cee Tee and his fellow musicians, to and from Justin, Gwen, and the characters who are fortunate to be in this aura. There’s also Justin’s frisky but loving guide dog, Candy (whose name provokes an impromptu Terry vocal on that Forties ballad).

The film offers a model for a sustaining spiritual exchange, where an Elder of the Tribe, honored and respected, has wisdom to pass on to the Youngbloods. And we can all learn from Terry. That Kauflin has done so with such easy openness is a testament to his heartfelt nature — Elders need Youngbloods to inspire. Hicks has returned his love to Terry through this film, which took five years to complete.

I urge you to seek out and watch KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON. As a document of affectionate mutual generosity and swinging music, it will inspire you. Here (https://www.facebook.com/keepinonfilm) is the film’s Facebook page, and here (http://youtu.be/kjR74w_GFWE%20) is a brief trailer.

Because for all its sad events, the film is light of heart, I have to conclude with something in that spirit. I now have a new catchphrase (although I might be reluctant to use it). Terry taught a very young Quincy Jones, who has never forgotten his mentor’s the kindness. They greet each other with a trumpeters’ in-joke: “Are your lips greasy?” meaning “Are you still playing? Are you still making the effort?” I’d like to see that cheerful phrase (puzzling to those not in the know) become part of any conversation.

May your happiness increase!

From: The Well-Tempered Ear
Reply-To: JAZZ LIVES

==============================================
PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Unsubscribe <<Email Address>> from this list:
http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=953c10744b

Our mailing address is:
Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

Our telephone:
845-986-1677

Forward this email to a friend:
http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=953c10744b&e=[UNIQID]

Update your profile:
http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]

slide

LOVE, WISDOM, AND GREASE: “KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON”

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/author/jazzlives/

** LOVE, WISDOM, AND GREASE: “KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON” (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/2014/10/04/love-wisdom-and-grease-keep-on-keepin-on/)
————————————————————
by jazzlives (http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/author/jazzlives/)

I was reluctant to watch the new documentary, KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON, about the relationship between aging jazz master Clark Terry (now 94) and his young protege Justin Kauflin (now 26). Years ago, Cee Tee told audiences — frequently and loudly — “The Golden Years SUCK!” and what I knew of his medical woes, diabetes culminating in loss of sight, and the amputation of both legs, had left me unwilling to watch a film chronicling the physical decline of a great artist.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ct-poster.jpg

I now know that this moving documentary is so much more than a chronicle of the physical breakdown of a once-vibrant man. I came away from the film uplifted by Clark’s indomitable love and spiritual energy, a bubbling life-force that cannot be stifled.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ct.jpg

But this is not only a film about Clark Terry. And although there is a good deal of rewarding archival footage (younger Clark with Ellington, Basie, and Quincy Jones) it is not a memorial to him.

Rather, it is about a mutual exchange between Terry and the young, inventive jazz pianist Kauflin who becomes Terry’s student — but at the same time sustains the older man, energizes him, and since Terry was losing his sight, develops into a valuable guide into that other world. (Kauflin lost his sight completely at 11.)

Cee Tee is able to teach the younger man valuable life-lessons about more than music, but Justin returns the favor generously, becoming a son both Terry and his wife can nurture. The film deftly and tenderly chronicles their relationship, not neglecting the sorrows along the way: Terry has immense medical setbacks; Kauflin is a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk competition but other pianists make it to the finals.

At the end of this beautifully photographed and edited film, there have been triumphs. In Kauflin’s case, he has impressed Dianne Reeves and Quincy Jones, so much so in the latter’s case that Jones has featured the young musician at the Montreux Jazz Festival and has asked him to be part of his next CD. For Terry, the triumphs are enacted on a smaller scale but are no less important. He keeps on, and it is not simply a matter of not dying. In the last minutes of the film, we see him instructing a young saxophonist in how best to phrase a flurry of notes. We leave the film with faith in Terry as a beacon of love and music — and we know that the young men and women he has taught and inspired will go on to inspire generations not yet born.

The film is full of delights: Terry’s instructing Kauflin in “old songs” such as BREEZE, talking with him about Ellington, and helping Kauflin become not only a better pianist but a more courageous young man. We see Terry’s generous spirit and the loving relationship he and wife Gwen have and sustain, and we understand more about Clark because of brief interviews with Herbie Hancock, Jones, and even an archival clip from Miles Davis. The film also lets young Kauflin have his say, and he comes across as self-aware, charming, and gracious, very much aware of his debt to his mentor.

Because the film’s director, Alan Hicks, was also a student of Terry’s, the film is lit from within by a rare sensitivity. It does not view the world of jazz superficially and erroneously from the outside. The film never seems maudlin or overdone, and critical audiences searching for errors won’t find them. And the musicians who praise Clark seem so fresh, their voices so authentic.

What any audience will find in this compact film (84 minutes) is love: passing generously between Cee Tee and his fellow musicians, to and from Justin, Gwen, and the characters who are fortunate to be in this aura. There’s also Justin’s frisky but loving guide dog, Candy (whose name provokes an impromptu Terry vocal on that Forties ballad).

The film offers a model for a sustaining spiritual exchange, where an Elder of the Tribe, honored and respected, has wisdom to pass on to the Youngbloods. And we can all learn from Terry. That Kauflin has done so with such easy openness is a testament to his heartfelt nature — Elders need Youngbloods to inspire. Hicks has returned his love to Terry through this film, which took five years to complete.

I urge you to seek out and watch KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON. As a document of affectionate mutual generosity and swinging music, it will inspire you. Here (https://www.facebook.com/keepinonfilm) is the film’s Facebook page, and here (http://youtu.be/kjR74w_GFWE%20) is a brief trailer.

Because for all its sad events, the film is light of heart, I have to conclude with something in that spirit. I now have a new catchphrase (although I might be reluctant to use it). Terry taught a very young Quincy Jones, who has never forgotten his mentor’s the kindness. They greet each other with a trumpeters’ in-joke: “Are your lips greasy?” meaning “Are you still playing? Are you still making the effort?” I’d like to see that cheerful phrase (puzzling to those not in the know) become part of any conversation.

May your happiness increase!

From: The Well-Tempered Ear
Reply-To: JAZZ LIVES

==============================================
PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Unsubscribe <<Email Address>> from this list:
http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=953c10744b

Our mailing address is:
Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

Our telephone:
845-986-1677

Forward this email to a friend:
http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=953c10744b&e=[UNIQID]

Update your profile:
http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]

slide

Bunny Price, R.I.P.

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://nepr.net/music/2014/10/02/bunny-price-r-i-p/

** Bunny Price, R.I.P.
————————————————————
Bunny Price, 1999

Bunny Price, the bassist who was at the center of Worcester’s jazz scene for over 60 years, died on September 27 at age 82. Born Elwood Price, Jr. on February 10, 1932, Bunny graduated from Commerce High in 1950 and served in the Army during the Korean War where he earned a Bronze Star for valor. He’ll be buried with full military honors following his funeral service on Friday at Belmont AME Zion Church in Worcester.

Price was one of the youngest members of a significant group of jazz musicians who emerged in Worcester between the teens and late fifties. They include Howard Jefferson, Jaki Byard, Barbara Carroll, Reggie Walley, Don Fagerquist, Frankie Capp, Emil Haddad, Al Arsenault, and two generations of the Price family.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/Barney-and-Bunny-Price.jpg

Father and Son: Barney and Bunny Price

Price grew up in a musical household in Worcester’s predominantly African American Laurel-Clayton neighborhood. He was the first-born son of Barney Price, a trumpeter and singer whose career began in the late twenties with Boots Ward and the Nite Hawks. (His brother Tommy, who survives him, established a career as a drummer in New York in the sixties.) Bunny began trumpet lessons in 1946 and was playing around Worcester with The 7 Brothers by the following year. He studied trumpet and jazz theory at Schillinger House in Boston for two years before entering the army, and after his discharge returned to study at Schillinger, which by then was renamed the Berklee College of Music. His musical associations at the time included an experimental big band led by Tony Zano, the Worcester-born pianist and modernist composer whose music was recorded by New York-based ensembles featuring Paul Chambers, Pepper Adams, Curtis Fuller, Tommy Flanagan, and other jazz greats in the early
sixties.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/BunnyPrice19621.jpg

Bunny Price in 1962.

While trumpet was his first instrument, Price told Chet Williamson for The Jazz Worcester Real Book (http://www.chetchromatic.com/worceser_real_book.html) , “My ear always heard the bass in the rhythm section.” In the late fifties, he saw a need for bass players on the local scene, and soon developed a proficiency on both double and electric bass. He worked with Fred Hall’s rehearsal band in the late fifties, and with saxophone great Boots Mussulli’s Milford-based big band in the mid-sixties. Throughout the decade, he played the weekly jam sessions at the Fox Lounge, Peacock Club, and other Central Massachusetts venues.

Price married Elizabeth “Betty” Salmon in 1955, and together they were instrumental in establishing community-based music programs in Worcester. They launched and maintained funding for the George Washington Carver Drum and Bugle Corps, which played throughout the Northeast from 1956 through 1964. Betty served as the longtime director of Prospect House, an anti-poverty and cultural center that gave prominence to jazz, poetry and dance; she co-founded Prospect House with Worcester native Abbey Hoffman in 1964. In 1973, she became the first African American woman to be elected to the Worcester School Committee, a milestone that exacted serious dues. During her candidacy, Price’s Main Street restaurant, The Rib Crib, was firebombed, an act long attributed to racists opposed not only to her election, but to the presence of a venue that drew blacks to the city’s main drag. Price was re-elected in 1975 and ’77. She died in 1992. Betty Price Park on Worcester’s Belmont Hill is named
in her memory.
Nat Simkins, tenor; Bunny Price, bass; Reggie Walley, drums; El Morocco, Worcester

Nat Simpkins, tenor; Bunny Price, bass; Reggie Walley, drums; El Morocco, Worcester

By the late sixties, opportunities to play jazz in commercial venues had become increasingly rare, but Bunny was a determined keeper of the flame and a man committed to black enterprise. In 1969, he combined resources with Reggie Walley, a swinging drummer and sparkling host, to open the Kitty Kat Lounge. The club’s jam sessions on Thursday nights and Sunday afternoons were a boon to jazz in downtown Worcester in the early seventies, and it was at the Kitty Kat where I first met Bunny, Reggie, and other seasoned jazz players who’d eschewed careers on the road for the sake of raising families and working day jobs close to home. Price, a father of five, worked for many years in the printing industry, while Walley operated a dance studio that served a couple of generations of would-be hoofers.
Howie Jefferson, Allen Mueller, Bobby Gould, Bunny Price and the groom

(The Soul Jazz Quartet: saxophonist Howie Jefferson, pianist Allen Mueller, drummer Bobby Gould, and bassist Bunny Price; groom at far left)

Musicians came from near and far to play the Kitty Kat’s jazz sessions. The club’s bread and butter was chitlin’ circuit r&b, but the jam sessions drew well too. It was at the Kitty Kat where I first experienced jazz that varied between the rigorously demanding and resolutely down home, the kind of place where modern jazz and classic blues existed happily side by side, where skilled practitioners graciously welcomed to the bandstand everyday people who felt a song like “Goin’ to Chicago Blues” comin’ on. There was continual banter between the players and audience, and a responsiveness to the music that seemed as ceremonial as anything I’d ever experienced in church. Worcester poet Nic Karcasinas captured an aspect of the Kitty Kat’s mythical aura for the handful of middle-class white kids like myself who discovered a new way of life there forty-five years ago. Karcasinas combined the figurative and literal in placing the second-floor club, “Two blocks beyond/Two flights
above.” It’s the “beyond” aspect that’s kept the Kitty Kat’s legacy a guiding force for me ever since.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/Hottentotte.jpg

Reggie Walley and Bunny Price, foreground; Teddy Blandon, Harvie Williams, and Terry Collins, outside The Hottentotte Lounge

It was a sad day for both players and patrons when the Kitty Kat closed its doors in 1974, but two years later Bunny and Reggie began a new operation a few blocks away at The Hottentotte, where jazz sessions retained the Sunday afternoon slot for the next decade. The Hottentotte was taken by eminent domain in 1984 when the Commonwealth built a new Registry of Motor Vehicles office on Main Street and sought to revive an otherwise blighted area. Thereafter, Bunny was instrumental in keeping the jazz fires lit at the Quinsigamond Lodge of Elks (the “black Elks”) on Chandler Street, and he played around town with Reggie Walley’s Bluesicians. For many years, he hosted “Maiden Voyage,” a weekly jazz program on WICN Public Radio in Worcester. Behind the mic, Bunny was as ever: a welcoming, no-nonsense man deeply committed to the music and, notwithstanding the travails, in tune with his hometown. Thanks, Bunny. May you rest in peace.

Here is Nic Karcasinas’s complete poem, which was published in his 1973 collection, Nicodemus.
Kitty Kat by Nic Karcasinas

Kitty Kat by Nic Karcasinas

(Thanks to Rich Falco, Professor of Music at WPI, and Chet Williamson, journalist, jazz harmonica player, and WICN host, for the extensive research and documentation they’ve done on Worcester’s jazz history. Click here (http://jazzhistorydatabase.com/content/musicians/price_bunny/biography.php) for the Jazz History Database feature on Bunny Price.)
Print this Article (http://www.printfriendly.com/print?url=http%3A%2F%2Fnepr.net%2Fmusic%2F2014%2F10%2F02%2Fbunny-price-r-i-p%2F)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=d629cc9029) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=d629cc9029&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Bunny Price, R.I.P.

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://nepr.net/music/2014/10/02/bunny-price-r-i-p/

** Bunny Price, R.I.P.
————————————————————
Bunny Price, 1999

Bunny Price, the bassist who was at the center of Worcester’s jazz scene for over 60 years, died on September 27 at age 82. Born Elwood Price, Jr. on February 10, 1932, Bunny graduated from Commerce High in 1950 and served in the Army during the Korean War where he earned a Bronze Star for valor. He’ll be buried with full military honors following his funeral service on Friday at Belmont AME Zion Church in Worcester.

Price was one of the youngest members of a significant group of jazz musicians who emerged in Worcester between the teens and late fifties. They include Howard Jefferson, Jaki Byard, Barbara Carroll, Reggie Walley, Don Fagerquist, Frankie Capp, Emil Haddad, Al Arsenault, and two generations of the Price family.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/Barney-and-Bunny-Price.jpg

Father and Son: Barney and Bunny Price

Price grew up in a musical household in Worcester’s predominantly African American Laurel-Clayton neighborhood. He was the first-born son of Barney Price, a trumpeter and singer whose career began in the late twenties with Boots Ward and the Nite Hawks. (His brother Tommy, who survives him, established a career as a drummer in New York in the sixties.) Bunny began trumpet lessons in 1946 and was playing around Worcester with The 7 Brothers by the following year. He studied trumpet and jazz theory at Schillinger House in Boston for two years before entering the army, and after his discharge returned to study at Schillinger, which by then was renamed the Berklee College of Music. His musical associations at the time included an experimental big band led by Tony Zano, the Worcester-born pianist and modernist composer whose music was recorded by New York-based ensembles featuring Paul Chambers, Pepper Adams, Curtis Fuller, Tommy Flanagan, and other jazz greats in the early
sixties.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/BunnyPrice19621.jpg

Bunny Price in 1962.

While trumpet was his first instrument, Price told Chet Williamson for The Jazz Worcester Real Book (http://www.chetchromatic.com/worceser_real_book.html) , “My ear always heard the bass in the rhythm section.” In the late fifties, he saw a need for bass players on the local scene, and soon developed a proficiency on both double and electric bass. He worked with Fred Hall’s rehearsal band in the late fifties, and with saxophone great Boots Mussulli’s Milford-based big band in the mid-sixties. Throughout the decade, he played the weekly jam sessions at the Fox Lounge, Peacock Club, and other Central Massachusetts venues.

Price married Elizabeth “Betty” Salmon in 1955, and together they were instrumental in establishing community-based music programs in Worcester. They launched and maintained funding for the George Washington Carver Drum and Bugle Corps, which played throughout the Northeast from 1956 through 1964. Betty served as the longtime director of Prospect House, an anti-poverty and cultural center that gave prominence to jazz, poetry and dance; she co-founded Prospect House with Worcester native Abbey Hoffman in 1964. In 1973, she became the first African American woman to be elected to the Worcester School Committee, a milestone that exacted serious dues. During her candidacy, Price’s Main Street restaurant, The Rib Crib, was firebombed, an act long attributed to racists opposed not only to her election, but to the presence of a venue that drew blacks to the city’s main drag. Price was re-elected in 1975 and ’77. She died in 1992. Betty Price Park on Worcester’s Belmont Hill is named
in her memory.
Nat Simkins, tenor; Bunny Price, bass; Reggie Walley, drums; El Morocco, Worcester

Nat Simpkins, tenor; Bunny Price, bass; Reggie Walley, drums; El Morocco, Worcester

By the late sixties, opportunities to play jazz in commercial venues had become increasingly rare, but Bunny was a determined keeper of the flame and a man committed to black enterprise. In 1969, he combined resources with Reggie Walley, a swinging drummer and sparkling host, to open the Kitty Kat Lounge. The club’s jam sessions on Thursday nights and Sunday afternoons were a boon to jazz in downtown Worcester in the early seventies, and it was at the Kitty Kat where I first met Bunny, Reggie, and other seasoned jazz players who’d eschewed careers on the road for the sake of raising families and working day jobs close to home. Price, a father of five, worked for many years in the printing industry, while Walley operated a dance studio that served a couple of generations of would-be hoofers.
Howie Jefferson, Allen Mueller, Bobby Gould, Bunny Price and the groom

(The Soul Jazz Quartet: saxophonist Howie Jefferson, pianist Allen Mueller, drummer Bobby Gould, and bassist Bunny Price; groom at far left)

Musicians came from near and far to play the Kitty Kat’s jazz sessions. The club’s bread and butter was chitlin’ circuit r&b, but the jam sessions drew well too. It was at the Kitty Kat where I first experienced jazz that varied between the rigorously demanding and resolutely down home, the kind of place where modern jazz and classic blues existed happily side by side, where skilled practitioners graciously welcomed to the bandstand everyday people who felt a song like “Goin’ to Chicago Blues” comin’ on. There was continual banter between the players and audience, and a responsiveness to the music that seemed as ceremonial as anything I’d ever experienced in church. Worcester poet Nic Karcasinas captured an aspect of the Kitty Kat’s mythical aura for the handful of middle-class white kids like myself who discovered a new way of life there forty-five years ago. Karcasinas combined the figurative and literal in placing the second-floor club, “Two blocks beyond/Two flights
above.” It’s the “beyond” aspect that’s kept the Kitty Kat’s legacy a guiding force for me ever since.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/Hottentotte.jpg

Reggie Walley and Bunny Price, foreground; Teddy Blandon, Harvie Williams, and Terry Collins, outside The Hottentotte Lounge

It was a sad day for both players and patrons when the Kitty Kat closed its doors in 1974, but two years later Bunny and Reggie began a new operation a few blocks away at The Hottentotte, where jazz sessions retained the Sunday afternoon slot for the next decade. The Hottentotte was taken by eminent domain in 1984 when the Commonwealth built a new Registry of Motor Vehicles office on Main Street and sought to revive an otherwise blighted area. Thereafter, Bunny was instrumental in keeping the jazz fires lit at the Quinsigamond Lodge of Elks (the “black Elks”) on Chandler Street, and he played around town with Reggie Walley’s Bluesicians. For many years, he hosted “Maiden Voyage,” a weekly jazz program on WICN Public Radio in Worcester. Behind the mic, Bunny was as ever: a welcoming, no-nonsense man deeply committed to the music and, notwithstanding the travails, in tune with his hometown. Thanks, Bunny. May you rest in peace.

Here is Nic Karcasinas’s complete poem, which was published in his 1973 collection, Nicodemus.
Kitty Kat by Nic Karcasinas

Kitty Kat by Nic Karcasinas

(Thanks to Rich Falco, Professor of Music at WPI, and Chet Williamson, journalist, jazz harmonica player, and WICN host, for the extensive research and documentation they’ve done on Worcester’s jazz history. Click here (http://jazzhistorydatabase.com/content/musicians/price_bunny/biography.php) for the Jazz History Database feature on Bunny Price.)
Print this Article (http://www.printfriendly.com/print?url=http%3A%2F%2Fnepr.net%2Fmusic%2F2014%2F10%2F02%2Fbunny-price-r-i-p%2F)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=d629cc9029) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=d629cc9029&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Bunny Price, R.I.P.

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://nepr.net/music/2014/10/02/bunny-price-r-i-p/

** Bunny Price, R.I.P.
————————————————————
Bunny Price, 1999

Bunny Price, the bassist who was at the center of Worcester’s jazz scene for over 60 years, died on September 27 at age 82. Born Elwood Price, Jr. on February 10, 1932, Bunny graduated from Commerce High in 1950 and served in the Army during the Korean War where he earned a Bronze Star for valor. He’ll be buried with full military honors following his funeral service on Friday at Belmont AME Zion Church in Worcester.

Price was one of the youngest members of a significant group of jazz musicians who emerged in Worcester between the teens and late fifties. They include Howard Jefferson, Jaki Byard, Barbara Carroll, Reggie Walley, Don Fagerquist, Frankie Capp, Emil Haddad, Al Arsenault, and two generations of the Price family.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/Barney-and-Bunny-Price.jpg

Father and Son: Barney and Bunny Price

Price grew up in a musical household in Worcester’s predominantly African American Laurel-Clayton neighborhood. He was the first-born son of Barney Price, a trumpeter and singer whose career began in the late twenties with Boots Ward and the Nite Hawks. (His brother Tommy, who survives him, established a career as a drummer in New York in the sixties.) Bunny began trumpet lessons in 1946 and was playing around Worcester with The 7 Brothers by the following year. He studied trumpet and jazz theory at Schillinger House in Boston for two years before entering the army, and after his discharge returned to study at Schillinger, which by then was renamed the Berklee College of Music. His musical associations at the time included an experimental big band led by Tony Zano, the Worcester-born pianist and modernist composer whose music was recorded by New York-based ensembles featuring Paul Chambers, Pepper Adams, Curtis Fuller, Tommy Flanagan, and other jazz greats in the early
sixties.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/BunnyPrice19621.jpg

Bunny Price in 1962.

While trumpet was his first instrument, Price told Chet Williamson for The Jazz Worcester Real Book (http://www.chetchromatic.com/worceser_real_book.html) , “My ear always heard the bass in the rhythm section.” In the late fifties, he saw a need for bass players on the local scene, and soon developed a proficiency on both double and electric bass. He worked with Fred Hall’s rehearsal band in the late fifties, and with saxophone great Boots Mussulli’s Milford-based big band in the mid-sixties. Throughout the decade, he played the weekly jam sessions at the Fox Lounge, Peacock Club, and other Central Massachusetts venues.

Price married Elizabeth “Betty” Salmon in 1955, and together they were instrumental in establishing community-based music programs in Worcester. They launched and maintained funding for the George Washington Carver Drum and Bugle Corps, which played throughout the Northeast from 1956 through 1964. Betty served as the longtime director of Prospect House, an anti-poverty and cultural center that gave prominence to jazz, poetry and dance; she co-founded Prospect House with Worcester native Abbey Hoffman in 1964. In 1973, she became the first African American woman to be elected to the Worcester School Committee, a milestone that exacted serious dues. During her candidacy, Price’s Main Street restaurant, The Rib Crib, was firebombed, an act long attributed to racists opposed not only to her election, but to the presence of a venue that drew blacks to the city’s main drag. Price was re-elected in 1975 and ’77. She died in 1992. Betty Price Park on Worcester’s Belmont Hill is named
in her memory.
Nat Simkins, tenor; Bunny Price, bass; Reggie Walley, drums; El Morocco, Worcester

Nat Simpkins, tenor; Bunny Price, bass; Reggie Walley, drums; El Morocco, Worcester

By the late sixties, opportunities to play jazz in commercial venues had become increasingly rare, but Bunny was a determined keeper of the flame and a man committed to black enterprise. In 1969, he combined resources with Reggie Walley, a swinging drummer and sparkling host, to open the Kitty Kat Lounge. The club’s jam sessions on Thursday nights and Sunday afternoons were a boon to jazz in downtown Worcester in the early seventies, and it was at the Kitty Kat where I first met Bunny, Reggie, and other seasoned jazz players who’d eschewed careers on the road for the sake of raising families and working day jobs close to home. Price, a father of five, worked for many years in the printing industry, while Walley operated a dance studio that served a couple of generations of would-be hoofers.
Howie Jefferson, Allen Mueller, Bobby Gould, Bunny Price and the groom

(The Soul Jazz Quartet: saxophonist Howie Jefferson, pianist Allen Mueller, drummer Bobby Gould, and bassist Bunny Price; groom at far left)

Musicians came from near and far to play the Kitty Kat’s jazz sessions. The club’s bread and butter was chitlin’ circuit r&b, but the jam sessions drew well too. It was at the Kitty Kat where I first experienced jazz that varied between the rigorously demanding and resolutely down home, the kind of place where modern jazz and classic blues existed happily side by side, where skilled practitioners graciously welcomed to the bandstand everyday people who felt a song like “Goin’ to Chicago Blues” comin’ on. There was continual banter between the players and audience, and a responsiveness to the music that seemed as ceremonial as anything I’d ever experienced in church. Worcester poet Nic Karcasinas captured an aspect of the Kitty Kat’s mythical aura for the handful of middle-class white kids like myself who discovered a new way of life there forty-five years ago. Karcasinas combined the figurative and literal in placing the second-floor club, “Two blocks beyond/Two flights
above.” It’s the “beyond” aspect that’s kept the Kitty Kat’s legacy a guiding force for me ever since.
http://nepr.files.s3.amazonaws.com/music/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/10/Hottentotte.jpg

Reggie Walley and Bunny Price, foreground; Teddy Blandon, Harvie Williams, and Terry Collins, outside The Hottentotte Lounge

It was a sad day for both players and patrons when the Kitty Kat closed its doors in 1974, but two years later Bunny and Reggie began a new operation a few blocks away at The Hottentotte, where jazz sessions retained the Sunday afternoon slot for the next decade. The Hottentotte was taken by eminent domain in 1984 when the Commonwealth built a new Registry of Motor Vehicles office on Main Street and sought to revive an otherwise blighted area. Thereafter, Bunny was instrumental in keeping the jazz fires lit at the Quinsigamond Lodge of Elks (the “black Elks”) on Chandler Street, and he played around town with Reggie Walley’s Bluesicians. For many years, he hosted “Maiden Voyage,” a weekly jazz program on WICN Public Radio in Worcester. Behind the mic, Bunny was as ever: a welcoming, no-nonsense man deeply committed to the music and, notwithstanding the travails, in tune with his hometown. Thanks, Bunny. May you rest in peace.

Here is Nic Karcasinas’s complete poem, which was published in his 1973 collection, Nicodemus.
Kitty Kat by Nic Karcasinas

Kitty Kat by Nic Karcasinas

(Thanks to Rich Falco, Professor of Music at WPI, and Chet Williamson, journalist, jazz harmonica player, and WICN host, for the extensive research and documentation they’ve done on Worcester’s jazz history. Click here (http://jazzhistorydatabase.com/content/musicians/price_bunny/biography.php) for the Jazz History Database feature on Bunny Price.)
Print this Article (http://www.printfriendly.com/print?url=http%3A%2F%2Fnepr.net%2Fmusic%2F2014%2F10%2F02%2Fbunny-price-r-i-p%2F)

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=d629cc9029) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=d629cc9029&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Quincy Jones on Clark Terry, a godfather of jazz | Marketplace.org

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/quincy-jones-clark-terry-godfather-jazz

** Quincy Jones on Clark Terry, a godfather of jazz
————————————————————

It’s unlikely that someone outside the jazz scene would cite Clark Terry if asked to name an influential jazz musician. That’s something legendary music producer Quincy Jones (https://twitter.com/QuincyDJones) and documentary filmmaker Alan Hicks hope to change.

The two have paired up to make “Keep on Keepin’ On (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2674040/) ,” a documentary that explains Terry’s role in shaping American jazz music and follows Terry’s work with one of his students.

Both Jones and Hicks agree Terry is one of the best trumpet players ever. He played with Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday and many more. He was also a member of Johnny Carson’s house band, the NBC Orchestra.

Hicks realized early on that to really illustrate Terry’s greatest legacy, they’d have to show him teaching.

“When we were doing interviews with all these greats, they would constantly be saying, ‘Yeah, he’s one of the greatest trumpet players that ever lived, but he’s also one of the greatest teachers to have ever lived,’” Hicks says.

Terry was known to be generous with his time with developing musicians. His students include Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Jones himself.

“I was 12, and I studied with him when I was 13,” Jones says. He remembers skipping school in Seattle to hang out with jazz musicians.

“Seattle was perfect to hang out with guys like Clark, and I begged him to give me a lesson,” he says.

Terry and a student, pianist Justin Kauflin (http://www.justinkauflin.com/) , share a special bond. Kauflin has been blind since he was 11, and Terry went blind more recently after a lifetime of diabetes. In the documentary, the two work through the ups and downs of trying to launch Kauflin’s jazz career.

Jones says that’s harder to do now than back when he started.

“Back then, you couldn’t get away from jazz,” Jones says. “It was in the air, the water. Today, they have to resist the pressure of their peers to say, ‘Let’s go see Lil Wayne, Jay Z and Kanye [West].”

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=73c2e5f021) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=73c2e5f021&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Quincy Jones on Clark Terry, a godfather of jazz | Marketplace.org

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/quincy-jones-clark-terry-godfather-jazz

** Quincy Jones on Clark Terry, a godfather of jazz
————————————————————

It’s unlikely that someone outside the jazz scene would cite Clark Terry if asked to name an influential jazz musician. That’s something legendary music producer Quincy Jones (https://twitter.com/QuincyDJones) and documentary filmmaker Alan Hicks hope to change.

The two have paired up to make “Keep on Keepin’ On (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2674040/) ,” a documentary that explains Terry’s role in shaping American jazz music and follows Terry’s work with one of his students.

Both Jones and Hicks agree Terry is one of the best trumpet players ever. He played with Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday and many more. He was also a member of Johnny Carson’s house band, the NBC Orchestra.

Hicks realized early on that to really illustrate Terry’s greatest legacy, they’d have to show him teaching.

“When we were doing interviews with all these greats, they would constantly be saying, ‘Yeah, he’s one of the greatest trumpet players that ever lived, but he’s also one of the greatest teachers to have ever lived,’” Hicks says.

Terry was known to be generous with his time with developing musicians. His students include Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Jones himself.

“I was 12, and I studied with him when I was 13,” Jones says. He remembers skipping school in Seattle to hang out with jazz musicians.

“Seattle was perfect to hang out with guys like Clark, and I begged him to give me a lesson,” he says.

Terry and a student, pianist Justin Kauflin (http://www.justinkauflin.com/) , share a special bond. Kauflin has been blind since he was 11, and Terry went blind more recently after a lifetime of diabetes. In the documentary, the two work through the ups and downs of trying to launch Kauflin’s jazz career.

Jones says that’s harder to do now than back when he started.

“Back then, you couldn’t get away from jazz,” Jones says. “It was in the air, the water. Today, they have to resist the pressure of their peers to say, ‘Let’s go see Lil Wayne, Jay Z and Kanye [West].”

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=73c2e5f021) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=73c2e5f021&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Quincy Jones on Clark Terry, a godfather of jazz | Marketplace.org

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/quincy-jones-clark-terry-godfather-jazz

** Quincy Jones on Clark Terry, a godfather of jazz
————————————————————

It’s unlikely that someone outside the jazz scene would cite Clark Terry if asked to name an influential jazz musician. That’s something legendary music producer Quincy Jones (https://twitter.com/QuincyDJones) and documentary filmmaker Alan Hicks hope to change.

The two have paired up to make “Keep on Keepin’ On (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2674040/) ,” a documentary that explains Terry’s role in shaping American jazz music and follows Terry’s work with one of his students.

Both Jones and Hicks agree Terry is one of the best trumpet players ever. He played with Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday and many more. He was also a member of Johnny Carson’s house band, the NBC Orchestra.

Hicks realized early on that to really illustrate Terry’s greatest legacy, they’d have to show him teaching.

“When we were doing interviews with all these greats, they would constantly be saying, ‘Yeah, he’s one of the greatest trumpet players that ever lived, but he’s also one of the greatest teachers to have ever lived,’” Hicks says.

Terry was known to be generous with his time with developing musicians. His students include Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Jones himself.

“I was 12, and I studied with him when I was 13,” Jones says. He remembers skipping school in Seattle to hang out with jazz musicians.

“Seattle was perfect to hang out with guys like Clark, and I begged him to give me a lesson,” he says.

Terry and a student, pianist Justin Kauflin (http://www.justinkauflin.com/) , share a special bond. Kauflin has been blind since he was 11, and Terry went blind more recently after a lifetime of diabetes. In the documentary, the two work through the ups and downs of trying to launch Kauflin’s jazz career.

Jones says that’s harder to do now than back when he started.

“Back then, you couldn’t get away from jazz,” Jones says. “It was in the air, the water. Today, they have to resist the pressure of their peers to say, ‘Let’s go see Lil Wayne, Jay Z and Kanye [West].”

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=73c2e5f021) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=73c2e5f021&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

A Conversation With Gunther Schuller | News | BMI.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.bmi.com/news/entry/a_conversation_with_gunther_schuller

** A Conversation With Gunther Schuller
————————————————————
Third Stream proponent and living legend Gunther Schuller. Third Stream proponent and living legend Gunther Schuller.

Gunther Schuller is full of dynamic energy as he continues to enjoy his career as a composer, conductor, educator and musician. There is a deluge of delightful stories that comes with chatting with the 88-year-old creative genius, whose latent musical talents emerged when he was a toddler; notably, conducting in perfect time to a gramophone recording of “The Roses of the South” waltz by Johann Strauss. A few years later, he sang Richard Wagner’s “Tannhäuser Overture,” imitating its sonorities and nuances, while at play. At 15, he played the French horn and toured with the American Ballet Theatre orchestra, traveling all over the United States. By the time he was 17, he joined the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra to play principal horn for two years before auditioning for a spot at the Metropolitan Opera in New York with George Szell. He went on to spend 15 years with them.

Schuller still considers New York an incredible musical center, and credits the city for his then-burgeoning interest with jazz. As September’s Classical Music Month closes out, the longtime BMI affiliate took some time out of his 12-hour day to talk to us about his amazing career and its beginnings, and to share what he has learned through the years.

How did your interest and work with jazz begin?
I never became a great, famous jazz horn player but I and three others in New York, we were sort of the pioneers of bringing the horn into jazz music. The first little jazz horn solo was [composed of] eight bars in an Artie Shaw recording of a piece called “Frenesi.” That was the first time a horn ever appeared on a recording.

By the middle to late forties, the horns were getting into recordings with Frank Sinatra and other bands. Claude Thornhill had two wonderful horn players and I got involved with this life, being a horn player in both classical and jazz. That developed my interest in jazz and I became somewhat [of a] major historian of jazz. And all of this probably would not have happened exactly in that way if I hadn’t been in New York.

You’ve said that the Third Stream is something like “if jazz and classical music begot a child.” Would you say you’re a little bit more partial to either genre?
It depends [on] who is creating it. I pronounced [this] to my father one day, and he nearly had a heart attack; [I said to him] that ‘Jazz — in the hands of the greatest jazz composers, players — is just as great as Beethoven or Bach.’ He came around after some years and especially when I became successful in jazz. The same in classical music. When Johann Sebastian Bach did it, that was the highest level of creativity by far at that time. The same thing about jazz. Duke Ellington is still the greatest composer we’ve had over the years and there are others like Charles Mingus, Gil Evans. Those are some of the really great ones whose music has lasted.

As the proponent of the Third Stream, do you have any favorite composers who were involved or a part of the genre?
The ones that I would mention immediately were on the one hand John [Lewis], the founder of the modern jazz quartet, and one of the great musicians of that time. We partnered up and did all kinds of fantastic things, bringing jazz and classical music together in our concerts. We started a publishing company to bring the music together. The other one is Mingus. In a way, Gil Evans was also a very classically oriented composer but he wrote these amazing jazz pieces. So those would be the three that took up the idea of bringing jazz and classical music together.

Speaking of supporting young composers, they would probably love to hear some career advice from you.
The basic thing is work extremely hard. Don’t drink a lot of beer every night. Work hard at whatever your talent may be. The thing about composing, nobody can tell — even Beethoven couldn’t tell until he had composed quite a bit of music and it got better and better — the degree of talent. You can’t get up one day [and say], ‘I’m going to be talented today and write a great piece.’ The only thing you can do is start composing and work your buns off working on it and studying the great music of the past and learning from it and then try to create sort of your own language. I emphasize the fact that I did not know the extent of my talent as a composer until maybe the last 10, 15 years. You just go on and you write some good pieces and not-so-good pieces, then you write a fantastic breakthrough piece, then you write seven pieces that are very good but not great. Eventually, you find out the extent and the limit of your talent. You have to be very modest about this, but work
hard, that’s all I can say.

I worked hard. I decided, at the age of 18, I would only sleep four hours a night because there was so much I wanted to learn and study. I studied the works of hundreds of composers. That’s what you have to do.

Could you tell us some more about your experiences with new compositions and upcoming projects?
When I got into my eighties, I began to realize that demand for my composing and conducting was leveling off. It wasn’t finished but it was starting to lessen. In 2011 I got a call from Tanglewood [Music Center, in Boston, Massachusetts], Ellen [Highstein], and she gave me a commission that was to be performed in 2012. I was so excited because I spent 25 fantastic years as artistic director of the school, so it was nice to have this desire on their part to commission me, to celebrate some of the things that I had done there. I wrote that piece in about 3–4 weeks in January and suddenly in February and March there came four more commissions.

I said [to myself], ‘What the hell is this?’ I will back that up with a little conversation — Aaron Copland and I were very close and at dinner he said, ‘Oh, by the way, Gunther, I’ve received two commissions this year.’ ‘Oh, Aaron, I also received two commissions,’ I said. We were both amazed. Aaron said (you know he was at that time the leading American composer, right?), ‘What have I done to deserve this?’ The point being, you didn’t get two commissions in a year. You were lucky if you got one. He was so surprised and I was, too.

This idea of suddenly getting four commissions, that was just incomprehensible to me. Within the last two years, I’ve received 20 commissions. This has never happened before, and I do not understand how or why it happened [though] I have some theories about it. I have now written 18 of those 20 [commissions]. One of the latest ones was a symphony for the Cincinnati Symphony. These were great commissions — the Miro String Quartet, which is one of three great string quartets in this country, various [commissions from] the London Philharmonic, Sau Paulo Symphony Orchestra — all kinds of fantastic commissions.

You’re definitely very busy. How do you balance your time? As you work on these commissions, how do you keep developing your craft?
You just keep on working and studying, and you can call it developing your craft. What is more important, and this applies to every great composer that has lived, what makes a composer great and memorable — Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, Hayden, Schumann, Wagner and then Strauss and then the 20th Schoenberg and the so-called Viennese school — and what makes them endure through two centuries is that they have found their own language.

You’re expected to develop some kind of craft, otherwise, forget it. But that’s not enough. Some people have a certain degree of craft but it’s the ideas of the music, it’s the substance of the music and ultimately the language of the music. Anyone versed in our classical repertory — if I hear three seconds of music that’s on the radio and I did not hear the announcement, I will immediately know that that’s either Beethoven or it’s Schuman or somebody. In other words, an instantly recognizable voice. That is the ultimate goal.

If you want to be so ambitious as to be a great composer, well, [it’s been] 10 years that I’ve felt that I could say, ‘Now, I have actually found my own personal language.’

** Listen to Gunther Schuller’s music on Spotify
————————————————————

photo A young Gunther Schuller.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=a4da8bbefe) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=a4da8bbefe&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

A Conversation With Gunther Schuller | News | BMI.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.bmi.com/news/entry/a_conversation_with_gunther_schuller

** A Conversation With Gunther Schuller
————————————————————
Third Stream proponent and living legend Gunther Schuller. Third Stream proponent and living legend Gunther Schuller.

Gunther Schuller is full of dynamic energy as he continues to enjoy his career as a composer, conductor, educator and musician. There is a deluge of delightful stories that comes with chatting with the 88-year-old creative genius, whose latent musical talents emerged when he was a toddler; notably, conducting in perfect time to a gramophone recording of “The Roses of the South” waltz by Johann Strauss. A few years later, he sang Richard Wagner’s “Tannhäuser Overture,” imitating its sonorities and nuances, while at play. At 15, he played the French horn and toured with the American Ballet Theatre orchestra, traveling all over the United States. By the time he was 17, he joined the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra to play principal horn for two years before auditioning for a spot at the Metropolitan Opera in New York with George Szell. He went on to spend 15 years with them.

Schuller still considers New York an incredible musical center, and credits the city for his then-burgeoning interest with jazz. As September’s Classical Music Month closes out, the longtime BMI affiliate took some time out of his 12-hour day to talk to us about his amazing career and its beginnings, and to share what he has learned through the years.

How did your interest and work with jazz begin?
I never became a great, famous jazz horn player but I and three others in New York, we were sort of the pioneers of bringing the horn into jazz music. The first little jazz horn solo was [composed of] eight bars in an Artie Shaw recording of a piece called “Frenesi.” That was the first time a horn ever appeared on a recording.

By the middle to late forties, the horns were getting into recordings with Frank Sinatra and other bands. Claude Thornhill had two wonderful horn players and I got involved with this life, being a horn player in both classical and jazz. That developed my interest in jazz and I became somewhat [of a] major historian of jazz. And all of this probably would not have happened exactly in that way if I hadn’t been in New York.

You’ve said that the Third Stream is something like “if jazz and classical music begot a child.” Would you say you’re a little bit more partial to either genre?
It depends [on] who is creating it. I pronounced [this] to my father one day, and he nearly had a heart attack; [I said to him] that ‘Jazz — in the hands of the greatest jazz composers, players — is just as great as Beethoven or Bach.’ He came around after some years and especially when I became successful in jazz. The same in classical music. When Johann Sebastian Bach did it, that was the highest level of creativity by far at that time. The same thing about jazz. Duke Ellington is still the greatest composer we’ve had over the years and there are others like Charles Mingus, Gil Evans. Those are some of the really great ones whose music has lasted.

As the proponent of the Third Stream, do you have any favorite composers who were involved or a part of the genre?
The ones that I would mention immediately were on the one hand John [Lewis], the founder of the modern jazz quartet, and one of the great musicians of that time. We partnered up and did all kinds of fantastic things, bringing jazz and classical music together in our concerts. We started a publishing company to bring the music together. The other one is Mingus. In a way, Gil Evans was also a very classically oriented composer but he wrote these amazing jazz pieces. So those would be the three that took up the idea of bringing jazz and classical music together.

Speaking of supporting young composers, they would probably love to hear some career advice from you.
The basic thing is work extremely hard. Don’t drink a lot of beer every night. Work hard at whatever your talent may be. The thing about composing, nobody can tell — even Beethoven couldn’t tell until he had composed quite a bit of music and it got better and better — the degree of talent. You can’t get up one day [and say], ‘I’m going to be talented today and write a great piece.’ The only thing you can do is start composing and work your buns off working on it and studying the great music of the past and learning from it and then try to create sort of your own language. I emphasize the fact that I did not know the extent of my talent as a composer until maybe the last 10, 15 years. You just go on and you write some good pieces and not-so-good pieces, then you write a fantastic breakthrough piece, then you write seven pieces that are very good but not great. Eventually, you find out the extent and the limit of your talent. You have to be very modest about this, but work
hard, that’s all I can say.

I worked hard. I decided, at the age of 18, I would only sleep four hours a night because there was so much I wanted to learn and study. I studied the works of hundreds of composers. That’s what you have to do.

Could you tell us some more about your experiences with new compositions and upcoming projects?
When I got into my eighties, I began to realize that demand for my composing and conducting was leveling off. It wasn’t finished but it was starting to lessen. In 2011 I got a call from Tanglewood [Music Center, in Boston, Massachusetts], Ellen [Highstein], and she gave me a commission that was to be performed in 2012. I was so excited because I spent 25 fantastic years as artistic director of the school, so it was nice to have this desire on their part to commission me, to celebrate some of the things that I had done there. I wrote that piece in about 3–4 weeks in January and suddenly in February and March there came four more commissions.

I said [to myself], ‘What the hell is this?’ I will back that up with a little conversation — Aaron Copland and I were very close and at dinner he said, ‘Oh, by the way, Gunther, I’ve received two commissions this year.’ ‘Oh, Aaron, I also received two commissions,’ I said. We were both amazed. Aaron said (you know he was at that time the leading American composer, right?), ‘What have I done to deserve this?’ The point being, you didn’t get two commissions in a year. You were lucky if you got one. He was so surprised and I was, too.

This idea of suddenly getting four commissions, that was just incomprehensible to me. Within the last two years, I’ve received 20 commissions. This has never happened before, and I do not understand how or why it happened [though] I have some theories about it. I have now written 18 of those 20 [commissions]. One of the latest ones was a symphony for the Cincinnati Symphony. These were great commissions — the Miro String Quartet, which is one of three great string quartets in this country, various [commissions from] the London Philharmonic, Sau Paulo Symphony Orchestra — all kinds of fantastic commissions.

You’re definitely very busy. How do you balance your time? As you work on these commissions, how do you keep developing your craft?
You just keep on working and studying, and you can call it developing your craft. What is more important, and this applies to every great composer that has lived, what makes a composer great and memorable — Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, Hayden, Schumann, Wagner and then Strauss and then the 20th Schoenberg and the so-called Viennese school — and what makes them endure through two centuries is that they have found their own language.

You’re expected to develop some kind of craft, otherwise, forget it. But that’s not enough. Some people have a certain degree of craft but it’s the ideas of the music, it’s the substance of the music and ultimately the language of the music. Anyone versed in our classical repertory — if I hear three seconds of music that’s on the radio and I did not hear the announcement, I will immediately know that that’s either Beethoven or it’s Schuman or somebody. In other words, an instantly recognizable voice. That is the ultimate goal.

If you want to be so ambitious as to be a great composer, well, [it’s been] 10 years that I’ve felt that I could say, ‘Now, I have actually found my own personal language.’

** Listen to Gunther Schuller’s music on Spotify
————————————————————

photo A young Gunther Schuller.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=a4da8bbefe) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=a4da8bbefe&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

A Conversation With Gunther Schuller | News | BMI.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.bmi.com/news/entry/a_conversation_with_gunther_schuller

** A Conversation With Gunther Schuller
————————————————————
Third Stream proponent and living legend Gunther Schuller. Third Stream proponent and living legend Gunther Schuller.

Gunther Schuller is full of dynamic energy as he continues to enjoy his career as a composer, conductor, educator and musician. There is a deluge of delightful stories that comes with chatting with the 88-year-old creative genius, whose latent musical talents emerged when he was a toddler; notably, conducting in perfect time to a gramophone recording of “The Roses of the South” waltz by Johann Strauss. A few years later, he sang Richard Wagner’s “Tannhäuser Overture,” imitating its sonorities and nuances, while at play. At 15, he played the French horn and toured with the American Ballet Theatre orchestra, traveling all over the United States. By the time he was 17, he joined the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra to play principal horn for two years before auditioning for a spot at the Metropolitan Opera in New York with George Szell. He went on to spend 15 years with them.

Schuller still considers New York an incredible musical center, and credits the city for his then-burgeoning interest with jazz. As September’s Classical Music Month closes out, the longtime BMI affiliate took some time out of his 12-hour day to talk to us about his amazing career and its beginnings, and to share what he has learned through the years.

How did your interest and work with jazz begin?
I never became a great, famous jazz horn player but I and three others in New York, we were sort of the pioneers of bringing the horn into jazz music. The first little jazz horn solo was [composed of] eight bars in an Artie Shaw recording of a piece called “Frenesi.” That was the first time a horn ever appeared on a recording.

By the middle to late forties, the horns were getting into recordings with Frank Sinatra and other bands. Claude Thornhill had two wonderful horn players and I got involved with this life, being a horn player in both classical and jazz. That developed my interest in jazz and I became somewhat [of a] major historian of jazz. And all of this probably would not have happened exactly in that way if I hadn’t been in New York.

You’ve said that the Third Stream is something like “if jazz and classical music begot a child.” Would you say you’re a little bit more partial to either genre?
It depends [on] who is creating it. I pronounced [this] to my father one day, and he nearly had a heart attack; [I said to him] that ‘Jazz — in the hands of the greatest jazz composers, players — is just as great as Beethoven or Bach.’ He came around after some years and especially when I became successful in jazz. The same in classical music. When Johann Sebastian Bach did it, that was the highest level of creativity by far at that time. The same thing about jazz. Duke Ellington is still the greatest composer we’ve had over the years and there are others like Charles Mingus, Gil Evans. Those are some of the really great ones whose music has lasted.

As the proponent of the Third Stream, do you have any favorite composers who were involved or a part of the genre?
The ones that I would mention immediately were on the one hand John [Lewis], the founder of the modern jazz quartet, and one of the great musicians of that time. We partnered up and did all kinds of fantastic things, bringing jazz and classical music together in our concerts. We started a publishing company to bring the music together. The other one is Mingus. In a way, Gil Evans was also a very classically oriented composer but he wrote these amazing jazz pieces. So those would be the three that took up the idea of bringing jazz and classical music together.

Speaking of supporting young composers, they would probably love to hear some career advice from you.
The basic thing is work extremely hard. Don’t drink a lot of beer every night. Work hard at whatever your talent may be. The thing about composing, nobody can tell — even Beethoven couldn’t tell until he had composed quite a bit of music and it got better and better — the degree of talent. You can’t get up one day [and say], ‘I’m going to be talented today and write a great piece.’ The only thing you can do is start composing and work your buns off working on it and studying the great music of the past and learning from it and then try to create sort of your own language. I emphasize the fact that I did not know the extent of my talent as a composer until maybe the last 10, 15 years. You just go on and you write some good pieces and not-so-good pieces, then you write a fantastic breakthrough piece, then you write seven pieces that are very good but not great. Eventually, you find out the extent and the limit of your talent. You have to be very modest about this, but work
hard, that’s all I can say.

I worked hard. I decided, at the age of 18, I would only sleep four hours a night because there was so much I wanted to learn and study. I studied the works of hundreds of composers. That’s what you have to do.

Could you tell us some more about your experiences with new compositions and upcoming projects?
When I got into my eighties, I began to realize that demand for my composing and conducting was leveling off. It wasn’t finished but it was starting to lessen. In 2011 I got a call from Tanglewood [Music Center, in Boston, Massachusetts], Ellen [Highstein], and she gave me a commission that was to be performed in 2012. I was so excited because I spent 25 fantastic years as artistic director of the school, so it was nice to have this desire on their part to commission me, to celebrate some of the things that I had done there. I wrote that piece in about 3–4 weeks in January and suddenly in February and March there came four more commissions.

I said [to myself], ‘What the hell is this?’ I will back that up with a little conversation — Aaron Copland and I were very close and at dinner he said, ‘Oh, by the way, Gunther, I’ve received two commissions this year.’ ‘Oh, Aaron, I also received two commissions,’ I said. We were both amazed. Aaron said (you know he was at that time the leading American composer, right?), ‘What have I done to deserve this?’ The point being, you didn’t get two commissions in a year. You were lucky if you got one. He was so surprised and I was, too.

This idea of suddenly getting four commissions, that was just incomprehensible to me. Within the last two years, I’ve received 20 commissions. This has never happened before, and I do not understand how or why it happened [though] I have some theories about it. I have now written 18 of those 20 [commissions]. One of the latest ones was a symphony for the Cincinnati Symphony. These were great commissions — the Miro String Quartet, which is one of three great string quartets in this country, various [commissions from] the London Philharmonic, Sau Paulo Symphony Orchestra — all kinds of fantastic commissions.

You’re definitely very busy. How do you balance your time? As you work on these commissions, how do you keep developing your craft?
You just keep on working and studying, and you can call it developing your craft. What is more important, and this applies to every great composer that has lived, what makes a composer great and memorable — Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, Hayden, Schumann, Wagner and then Strauss and then the 20th Schoenberg and the so-called Viennese school — and what makes them endure through two centuries is that they have found their own language.

You’re expected to develop some kind of craft, otherwise, forget it. But that’s not enough. Some people have a certain degree of craft but it’s the ideas of the music, it’s the substance of the music and ultimately the language of the music. Anyone versed in our classical repertory — if I hear three seconds of music that’s on the radio and I did not hear the announcement, I will immediately know that that’s either Beethoven or it’s Schuman or somebody. In other words, an instantly recognizable voice. That is the ultimate goal.

If you want to be so ambitious as to be a great composer, well, [it’s been] 10 years that I’ve felt that I could say, ‘Now, I have actually found my own personal language.’

** Listen to Gunther Schuller’s music on Spotify
————————————————————

photo A young Gunther Schuller.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=a4da8bbefe) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=a4da8bbefe&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

‘Music’ and all that jazz – CNN Photos – CNN.com Blogs

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676

http://cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2014/09/30/music-and-all-that-jazz/?hpt=hp_bn14

You can view her jazz photos (http://www.deborahfeingold.com/index.php?id=1) HERE

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=ee5375748c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=ee5375748c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

‘Music’ and all that jazz – CNN Photos – CNN.com Blogs

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676

http://cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2014/09/30/music-and-all-that-jazz/?hpt=hp_bn14

You can view her jazz photos (http://www.deborahfeingold.com/index.php?id=1) HERE

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=ee5375748c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=ee5375748c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

‘Music’ and all that jazz – CNN Photos – CNN.com Blogs

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676

http://cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2014/09/30/music-and-all-that-jazz/?hpt=hp_bn14

You can view her jazz photos (http://www.deborahfeingold.com/index.php?id=1) HERE

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=ee5375748c) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=ee5375748c&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Free Download: Al Cohn Great American Music Hall San Francisco, CA Oct 8, 1978

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.concertvault.com/al-cohn/great-american-music-hall-october-08-1978.html?utm_source=CVNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=141001 (http://www.concertvault.com/al-cohn/great-american-music-hall-october-08-1978.html?utm_source=CVNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=141001)

Al Cohn – tenor sax
Jimmy Rowles – piano
Bob Cranshaw – electric bass
Mousey Alexander – drums
Special guest:
Zoot Sims – tenor sax

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=04ad45077d) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=04ad45077d&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Free Download: Al Cohn Great American Music Hall San Francisco, CA Oct 8, 1978

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.concertvault.com/al-cohn/great-american-music-hall-october-08-1978.html?utm_source=CVNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=141001 (http://www.concertvault.com/al-cohn/great-american-music-hall-october-08-1978.html?utm_source=CVNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=141001)

Al Cohn – tenor sax
Jimmy Rowles – piano
Bob Cranshaw – electric bass
Mousey Alexander – drums
Special guest:
Zoot Sims – tenor sax

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=04ad45077d) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=04ad45077d&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Free Download: Al Cohn Great American Music Hall San Francisco, CA Oct 8, 1978

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.concertvault.com/al-cohn/great-american-music-hall-october-08-1978.html?utm_source=CVNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=141001 (http://www.concertvault.com/al-cohn/great-american-music-hall-october-08-1978.html?utm_source=CVNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=141001)

Al Cohn – tenor sax
Jimmy Rowles – piano
Bob Cranshaw – electric bass
Mousey Alexander – drums
Special guest:
Zoot Sims – tenor sax

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=04ad45077d) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=04ad45077d&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Trombonist Lucien Barbarin to kick off 20th anniversary Nickel-A-Dance traditional jazz series Oct. 5 | NOLA.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.nola.com/music/index.ssf/2014/09/nickel-a-dance_traditional_jaz.html

** Trombonist Lucien Barbarin to kick off 20th anniversary Nickel-A-Dance traditional jazz series Oct. 5
————————————————————
lucien barbarin

The Nickel-A-Dance (http://www.nojc.org/nickel) series of free, all-ages traditional jazz shows on Sunday afternoons in March and October is much different than when it launched in 1994. It is now based at Maison, across Frenchmen Street from the now-shuttered Café Brasil, where it started. Another difference? People actually dance at Nickel-A-Dance now.

In October 1994, the inaugural Nickel-a-Dance concert was presented in conjunction with Jazz Awareness Month and the Jazz Town Awards. Jazz historian Dick Allen suggested the name, based on a tradition from 1920s New Orleans dance halls of men paying women a nickel for a dance (the price apparently went up to a dime in the 1930s). That initial concert featured Percy Humphrey, the trumpeter best known for his long tenure at Preservation Hall (he would pass away the following year).

The show went over so well that the next year, Nickel-A-Dance expanded to a full month of Sunday afternoons. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, when the preservation of distinctly New Orleans cultural traditions took on an extra sense of urgency, Nickel-A-Dance expanded once again to feature both a fall and a spring season.

On Sunday, Oct. 5, from 4 to 7 p.m., Nickel-A-Dance kicks off its 20^thanniversary season with trombonist Lucien Barbarin’s New Life Jazz Band. Barbarin’s extensive resume in New Orleans music includes a childhood stint with his uncle Paul Barbarin’s Onward Brass Band, co-founding the influential Fairview Baptist Christian Church Band with his cousin Danny Barker, European tours with Wallace Davenport, Lars Edegran and the Young Tuxedo Brass Band and, for the past 20-plus years, an ongoing collaboration with Harry Connick Jr.

Barbarin and the other latter-day Nickel-A-Dance bands are generally called on to fuel a crowd of dancers. Early on, the crowd tended to be older. But after the swing dance revival of the late 1990s, an influx of younger, hot-jazz and swing dance enthusiasts began filling the dance floor.

Every Sunday in October, they’ll be swinging around the broad dance floor at Maison, where the series moved after Café Brasil closed in the late 2000s. As many as 300 people sometimes show up, says co-founder Jason Patterson, who also books the music at Snug Harbor. Admission for Nickel-A-Dance is free; a coalition of individuals, small businesses and grants from arts organizations pays the bills, including the musicians’ salaries.

The fall 2014 series continues with the New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra on Oct. 12 and trumpeter Gregg Stafford & His Jazz Hounds on Oct. 19. The season concludes Oct. 26 with the Palm Court Jazz Band paying tribute to the late trumpeter and singer Lionel Ferbos, a Nickel-A-Dance regular. Mr. Ferbos died in July (http://www.nola.com/music/index.ssf/2014/07/lionel_ferbos_the_longest-tenu_1.html) , two days after celebrating his 103^rd birthday.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=031a810237) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=031a810237&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Trombonist Lucien Barbarin to kick off 20th anniversary Nickel-A-Dance traditional jazz series Oct. 5 | NOLA.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.nola.com/music/index.ssf/2014/09/nickel-a-dance_traditional_jaz.html

** Trombonist Lucien Barbarin to kick off 20th anniversary Nickel-A-Dance traditional jazz series Oct. 5
————————————————————
lucien barbarin

The Nickel-A-Dance (http://www.nojc.org/nickel) series of free, all-ages traditional jazz shows on Sunday afternoons in March and October is much different than when it launched in 1994. It is now based at Maison, across Frenchmen Street from the now-shuttered Café Brasil, where it started. Another difference? People actually dance at Nickel-A-Dance now.

In October 1994, the inaugural Nickel-a-Dance concert was presented in conjunction with Jazz Awareness Month and the Jazz Town Awards. Jazz historian Dick Allen suggested the name, based on a tradition from 1920s New Orleans dance halls of men paying women a nickel for a dance (the price apparently went up to a dime in the 1930s). That initial concert featured Percy Humphrey, the trumpeter best known for his long tenure at Preservation Hall (he would pass away the following year).

The show went over so well that the next year, Nickel-A-Dance expanded to a full month of Sunday afternoons. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, when the preservation of distinctly New Orleans cultural traditions took on an extra sense of urgency, Nickel-A-Dance expanded once again to feature both a fall and a spring season.

On Sunday, Oct. 5, from 4 to 7 p.m., Nickel-A-Dance kicks off its 20^thanniversary season with trombonist Lucien Barbarin’s New Life Jazz Band. Barbarin’s extensive resume in New Orleans music includes a childhood stint with his uncle Paul Barbarin’s Onward Brass Band, co-founding the influential Fairview Baptist Christian Church Band with his cousin Danny Barker, European tours with Wallace Davenport, Lars Edegran and the Young Tuxedo Brass Band and, for the past 20-plus years, an ongoing collaboration with Harry Connick Jr.

Barbarin and the other latter-day Nickel-A-Dance bands are generally called on to fuel a crowd of dancers. Early on, the crowd tended to be older. But after the swing dance revival of the late 1990s, an influx of younger, hot-jazz and swing dance enthusiasts began filling the dance floor.

Every Sunday in October, they’ll be swinging around the broad dance floor at Maison, where the series moved after Café Brasil closed in the late 2000s. As many as 300 people sometimes show up, says co-founder Jason Patterson, who also books the music at Snug Harbor. Admission for Nickel-A-Dance is free; a coalition of individuals, small businesses and grants from arts organizations pays the bills, including the musicians’ salaries.

The fall 2014 series continues with the New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra on Oct. 12 and trumpeter Gregg Stafford & His Jazz Hounds on Oct. 19. The season concludes Oct. 26 with the Palm Court Jazz Band paying tribute to the late trumpeter and singer Lionel Ferbos, a Nickel-A-Dance regular. Mr. Ferbos died in July (http://www.nola.com/music/index.ssf/2014/07/lionel_ferbos_the_longest-tenu_1.html) , two days after celebrating his 103^rd birthday.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=031a810237) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=031a810237&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Trombonist Lucien Barbarin to kick off 20th anniversary Nickel-A-Dance traditional jazz series Oct. 5 | NOLA.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.nola.com/music/index.ssf/2014/09/nickel-a-dance_traditional_jaz.html

** Trombonist Lucien Barbarin to kick off 20th anniversary Nickel-A-Dance traditional jazz series Oct. 5
————————————————————
lucien barbarin

The Nickel-A-Dance (http://www.nojc.org/nickel) series of free, all-ages traditional jazz shows on Sunday afternoons in March and October is much different than when it launched in 1994. It is now based at Maison, across Frenchmen Street from the now-shuttered Café Brasil, where it started. Another difference? People actually dance at Nickel-A-Dance now.

In October 1994, the inaugural Nickel-a-Dance concert was presented in conjunction with Jazz Awareness Month and the Jazz Town Awards. Jazz historian Dick Allen suggested the name, based on a tradition from 1920s New Orleans dance halls of men paying women a nickel for a dance (the price apparently went up to a dime in the 1930s). That initial concert featured Percy Humphrey, the trumpeter best known for his long tenure at Preservation Hall (he would pass away the following year).

The show went over so well that the next year, Nickel-A-Dance expanded to a full month of Sunday afternoons. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, when the preservation of distinctly New Orleans cultural traditions took on an extra sense of urgency, Nickel-A-Dance expanded once again to feature both a fall and a spring season.

On Sunday, Oct. 5, from 4 to 7 p.m., Nickel-A-Dance kicks off its 20^thanniversary season with trombonist Lucien Barbarin’s New Life Jazz Band. Barbarin’s extensive resume in New Orleans music includes a childhood stint with his uncle Paul Barbarin’s Onward Brass Band, co-founding the influential Fairview Baptist Christian Church Band with his cousin Danny Barker, European tours with Wallace Davenport, Lars Edegran and the Young Tuxedo Brass Band and, for the past 20-plus years, an ongoing collaboration with Harry Connick Jr.

Barbarin and the other latter-day Nickel-A-Dance bands are generally called on to fuel a crowd of dancers. Early on, the crowd tended to be older. But after the swing dance revival of the late 1990s, an influx of younger, hot-jazz and swing dance enthusiasts began filling the dance floor.

Every Sunday in October, they’ll be swinging around the broad dance floor at Maison, where the series moved after Café Brasil closed in the late 2000s. As many as 300 people sometimes show up, says co-founder Jason Patterson, who also books the music at Snug Harbor. Admission for Nickel-A-Dance is free; a coalition of individuals, small businesses and grants from arts organizations pays the bills, including the musicians’ salaries.

The fall 2014 series continues with the New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra on Oct. 12 and trumpeter Gregg Stafford & His Jazz Hounds on Oct. 19. The season concludes Oct. 26 with the Palm Court Jazz Band paying tribute to the late trumpeter and singer Lionel Ferbos, a Nickel-A-Dance regular. Mr. Ferbos died in July (http://www.nola.com/music/index.ssf/2014/07/lionel_ferbos_the_longest-tenu_1.html) , two days after celebrating his 103^rd birthday.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=031a810237) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=031a810237&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Bluetooth Gramophone

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
Introducing the world’s first Bluetooth Gramophone by Gramovox: http://gramovox.com/
The functional device beautifully marries old and new to bring to life the bold design and authentic, vintage sound of 1920s gramophones. The Gramovox streams nostalgia as makes classic jazz sound the way it should.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=2249d65ac0) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=2249d65ac0&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

slide

Bluetooth Gramophone

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
Introducing the world’s first Bluetooth Gramophone by Gramovox: http://gramovox.com/
The functional device beautifully marries old and new to bring to life the bold design and authentic, vintage sound of 1920s gramophones. The Gramovox streams nostalgia as makes classic jazz sound the way it should.

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=2249d65ac0) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=2249d65ac0&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

Call Now Button