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Be-Bop Glasses

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A Cultural Conversation: Terry Teachout and John Douglas Thompson on ‘Satchmo at the Waldorf’ – WSJ

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** Stage Confessions
————————————————————

John Douglas Thompson (left) and Terry Teachout are the star and playwright, respectively, of ‘Satchmo at the Waldorf,’ which is running off-Broadway. Fred Harper

New York

A day after winning the Drama Desk Award for outstanding solo performance on June 1, actor John Douglas Thompson sat on the stage at an empty Westside Theatre, where he plays Louis Armstrong in “Satchmo at the Waldorf.” Seated across from him on the set’s sofa was Terry Teachout, the play’s writer (and this newspaper’s drama critic), who was awarded a Bradley Prize days earlier. Reunited to talk about the one-man play, the performer and playwright spoke freely about craft, process and an unlikely subplot—how they wound up as collaborators.

“Most playwrights want actors to stick to the script, while most directors don’t want playwrights around during rehearsals to avoid intrusion,” Mr. Thompson, 50, said. “But having Terry there at rehearsals helped me with Armstrong’s intentions. He allowed me to validate my character choices.”

Mr. Teachout, 58, jumped in. “When John first asked me, ‘What does Armstrong mean when he says this?’ I was stunned. My instinct was to say, ‘Well, whatever you’d like it to mean.’ But after a week, I realized he needed answers to build his character. Likewise, he suggested line changes that made the play stronger. Whenever we disagreed, we agreed to try it.”

The “Odd Couple” quality of Messrs. Teachout and Thompson is unmistakable. As a critic, Mr. Teachout spends much of his time alone observing, analyzing and writing, while Mr. Thompson thrives on working with other actors. What they have in common now is artistic crossover. Few drama critics have written commercial plays or been intimately involved in a production, and most actors rarely get to perform alone or tinker with lines.

“Satchmo” opens with Armstrong backstage at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel after a performance months before his death in 1971. The Armstrong character reflects on a lifetime of Faustian bargains, global celebrity and painful abandonment by black audiences and younger jazz musicians. While Armstrong’s Waldorf appearance occupies only a few pages of Mr. Teachout’s 2009 biography, “Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong,” Mr. Teachout used the green room as an ideal setting for Armstrong’s stage confessions and confusion. In “Satchmo,” Mr. Thompson plays not only Armstrong but also Joe Glaser, the trumpeter’s mob-connected white manager, and a condescending Miles Davis—startling role swaps that occur instantly on stage through changes in voice, physical appearance and lighting.

Early on, Mr. Thompson’s suggested line edits were subtle but significant. “At a critical moment toward the end of the play, Armstrong shrugs off an unfortunate event and says he’ll include it in his autobiography,” said Mr. Thompson. “When we started rehearsals, I said the line as ‘I guess I’ll have to put that in the book, too,’ almost as an afterthought. Then I took out ‘have to,’ so it was more direct and emotional: ‘I guess I’ll put that in the book, too.’ It’s a self-realization that the event is an inescapable part of his legacy. Now the line is, ‘Guess . . . I’ll put that . . . in the book . . . too.’ It’s a bit slower and weighted, and resigned to what he must do.”

From the start, Mr. Teachout knew what he didn’t want. “I didn’t want a Rich Little impersonation of Armstrong, because that’s not what real actors do. When you mimic a character, you wind up with what Gordon [Edelstein, “Satchmo’s” director] calls a ‘taxidermy play’—a stuffed model of the real thing. That’s not art. When Armstrong starts this play, he’s not a finished product. When it’s over, he is. He has answered the questions he has raised about the meaning of his life.”

But how does a theater critic suspend self-evaluation when writing a play? “When I started, I told myself I’d write only lines that Armstrong actually said,” recalled Mr. Teachout. “Well, that worked for about 10 minutes. I realized I had to go wherever the Armstrong character led me. The difference between writing a biography and a play about the same subject is you don’t have to tell the truth in the play. In ‘Pops’ I could only speculate about things that I suspected. In ‘Satchmo,’ I could imagine things and create them myself. It was liberating.”

Much of “Satchmo’s” energy relies on keeping the audience off-balance. “The audience arrives imagining the play is going to be about old Louis blowing his horn and having fun,” Mr. Thompson said. “But they quickly learn they’re in the midst of this uncomfortable drama about a man coming to grips with his legacy.”

Mr. Thompson credits Mr. Teachout’s evening job for solidifying their relationship. “Because Terry watches plays as a critic, he knew when to suggest how to play something for an audience. There was a point in rehearsals when I wasn’t really sure how to develop what Terry had written. I had the lines in my head, I had the blocking in my body but I wasn’t sure about the balance between the play’s intellectual and emotional ideas. Terry gave me the critic’s perspective in those areas and he was my first true audience.”

If there was a moment of rare divergence last week between Mr. Thompson and Mr. Teachout, it came during a discussion about whether the play had an ulterior motive. “I never thought of this play as a crusade,” Mr. Teachout said. “I didn’t write it as a mission to rehabilitate Armstrong’s reputation or to tell audiences what they should think about him. It’s up to them to determine whether or not Armstrong was an Uncle Tom, how Glaser felt about him and how he felt about Glaser. The play leaves it to you.”

Mr. Thompson had a slightly different take. “As the play’s performer, I had to come at it from the perspective of an African-American artist and the reality of my generation’s view that Armstrong was a cartoonish figure, an Uncle Tom. Then I had to go on this journey through research to understand the forces he faced and his triumphs over hardship. Along the way I was exposed to Armstrong’s integrity, virtuosity, generosity, kindness and love and his ability to entertain and spread joy. I wound up with a greater perspective and understanding of his life, which is what I want to share with audiences.”

Mr. Teachout added a caveat. “Agreed, but the play wouldn’t have worked if I had tried to do that in the writing,” he said. “It would have come off as a sermon. Oscar Wilde once said no real artist ever tries to prove anything. What he meant is that if you tell the truth, it will prove itself. Hopefully, all of us told the truth and audiences will leave with a finer appreciation of the choices Louis made and the value of what he left behind.”

Mr. Myers, a frequent contributor to the Journal, writes daily about music at JazzWax.com.

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News and notes: Jazz sleuths, saxophonists and more – Oakland Jazz music | Examiner.com

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http://www.examiner.com/article/news-and-notes-jazz-sleuths-saxophonists-and-more?CID=examiner_alerts_article

June 17, 2014

Gershwin might have written the lyrics, but I seriously doubt the composer actually believed that come summertime the living is easy. Things have certainly been hectic in my world the past few days as we count down to the official start of summer and – far more important – my summer vacation. A variety of items have washed up in my e-mail in recent days, so let’s get to them.

If you’ve yet to do so, click on over to JazzWest.com (http://jazzwest.com/) to read an excerpt from “And All That Madness,” Joan Merrill’s jazz (http://www.examiner.com/topic/jazz) -themed whodunit featuring her sleuth Casey McKie. Merrill knows of what she writes, having worked in music for more than 20 years as an artist manager and documentary producer. Her previous McKie novels include “And All That Murder” (2009), “And All That Sea” (2010), “And All That Stalking” (2011) and “And All That Motive” (2014).

I had the opportunity a few years back to catch a then-teen Grace Kelly at the Brubeck Institute’s Summer Jazz Colony. The saxophonist has since matured into one of the genre’s top young talents and has a Kickstarter (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gracekellymusic/grace-kellys-working-for-the-dreamers-ep) campaign underway to fund her next recording project. This represents a fine opportunity to invest in jazz’s future at whatever level suits you best.

Bay Area trumpeter-composer Ian Carey (http://www.examiner.com/article/context-is-king-for-the-ian-carey-quintet) has been a favorite of mine since I first heard his “Contextualizin’” CD. His notoriety, it turns out, has spread to the East Coast. Carey reports being “very flattered that composer, saxophonist, author and historian extraordinaire Bill Kirchner has decided to devote an episode of his great radio show, ‘Jazz from the Archives,’ to my music. The show is broadcast on WBGO on the East Coast, but you can tune in online at WBGO.org.” The program airs 8 p.m. this Sunday.

Bay Area smooth jazz fans have the rare opportunity to catch two of the genre’s stars in action this weekend, as saxophonists Marion Meadows and Paul Taylor share the bill Saturday at Yoshi’s (http://yoshis.com/) in Oakland. The pair has dubbed their summer shows the Sax and the City tour, which is unfortunately hackneyed but should make for a fine evening of smooth jazz nonetheless.

Finally, in response to my posting (http://www.examiner.com/article/beyond-the-hendrix-connection-remembering-alan-douglas-jazz-albums) regarding Jimi Hendrix archival producer Alan Douglas’ jazz credits, I received an e-mail from Jim Eigo of Jazz Promo Services in Warwick, N.Y. “Don’t forget the Wildflowers Loft Jazz Series. I produced the reissues (http://www.examiner.com/topic/reissues) for the Knitting Factory and did the deal with Alan Douglas to secure the masters.” Here is some additional information.

The Loft Jazz scene was a cultural phenomenon that occurred in New York City during the mid-1970s at venues such as Environ, Ali’s Alley and Studio Rivbea, all in former industrial loft spaces in NYC’s SOHO (http://www.examiner.com/topic/soho) district. The scene was documented by Gary Giddins, the late Robert Palmer (author/producer) and Stanley Crouch.
Many of the musicians featured were from Chicago and particularly the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) and St. Louis’ Black Artists Group (BAG). These included notables such as The Art Ensemble of Chicago, Muhal Richard Abrams, Anthony Braxton, Dave Holland, Sam Rivers, Rashied Ali, Charles Tyler, Perry Robinson, John Fischer, Jeanne Lee, Oliver Lake, Joseph Bowie, Keshavan Maslak, Hamiett Bluiett, Arthur Blythe, Chico Freeman, David Murray, Olu Dara, George Lewis, Air, the Revolutionary Ensemble and Anthony Davis. Loft jazz was a continuation of the free jazz and avant-garde jazz traditions inaugurated by John Coltrane (http://www.examiner.com/topic/john-coltrane) , Ornette Coleman, Albert Ayler, Pharoah Sanders and Sun Ra.
A series of five LPs was released on Casablanca Records in 1976, documenting different sessions of Sam Rivers-hosted loft sessions. Portions of the sessions have been reissued variously on Alan Douglas Music and Knitting Factory Records.

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Donald Russell Connor, 92, bank vice president and jazz buff – Philly.com

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http://articles.philly.com/2014-06-16/news/50626782_1_benny-goodman-jazz-buff-drummer

** Donald Russell Connor, 92, bank vice president and jazz buff
————————————————————

BY HIS OWN admission, Russ Connor was something of a wild man in his youth.

There was the time he and some buddies commandeered a trolley to drive them from dry Ocean City, N.J., to wet Somers Point for a night of intemperance.

He once raced his Pontiac GTO full-out on an unopened section of the Atlantic City Expressway, not the safest venture even on a vacant road.

His expenses and his caprices were paid for at least in part by the $20 weekly check he got from the government as a returning GI. He was an Army veteran of World War II.

Donald Russell Connor, who went from his carefree years to the sober world of banking, working his way up to vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, a jazz buff who wrote four books on Benny Goodman and became pals with drummer Gene Krupa, died Wednesday at age 92. He was one of the original homeowners in Levittown.

Russ, as he was known to family and friends, assembled one of the foremost collections of big-band music – buying, selling and trading records with fellow enthusiasts as far away as Switzerland and Thailand.

A drummer himself, Russ met Gene Krupa in 1936 at Atlantic City’s Steel Pier and kept up a friendship with the famed drummer until Krupa’s death in 1971.

Russ had been a fan of Benny Goodman since Russ’ teenage years and finally got to meet his hero in the 1950s after attending numerous performances of the clarinetist’s big bands.

Russ compiled Goodman’s music in books published between 1958 and 1994, starting with BG – Off the Record. The books included personal memoirs and behind-the-scenes color. He had access to Goodman’s personal archive as well as to collections of Goodmanania by researchers and specialists worldwide.

The final book, Wrappin’ It Up, catalogs hundreds of previously unknown recordings along with never-before-published photographs.

Russ was almost 88 when he shared his recollections and insight about Goodman in an hour-long interview on public radio station WDUQ in Pittsburgh in May 2009, the 100th anniversary of Goodman’s birth.

“Russ considered Goodman a friend and displayed one of his clarinets, a gift, in his music room along with drumsticks from Krupa,” his family said.

Russ was born in Philadelphia. He was raised by his mother, Clara W. Schmidt, a widow who worked for the old Bell Telephone Co., and grandparents who were immigrants from Germany.

He graduated from Frankford High School in 1938 at age 16. He won an academic scholarship to Ursinus College in Collegeville, and received a bachelor’s degree in economics in 1942.

Russ was inducted into the Army that November despite poor eyesight that made him dependent on glasses. He worried that he would be in serious trouble if he lost his glasses among enemy soldiers.

Fortunately, that didn’t happen. As a member of the 70th Reinforcement Battalion, he arrived in Normandy after the invasion and climbed Omaha Beach, where his unit had to avoid marked minefields.

He told about the time Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, the supreme commander of the Allied troops in Europe, inspected his battalion, whose job was to reprocess wounded soldiers back to duty.

When the war in Europe ended, Russ joined a postal unit and sailed through the Panama Canal to Manila. He spent time in Japan before being discharged.

Back home, Russ had a succession of jobs that he described as “semi-satisfactory,” before he joined the Federal Reserve Bank. He was promoted to vice president in 1973, and got to oversee construction of the bank building on Independence Mall.

He had the satisfaction of working with artists Alexander Calder and Beverly Pepper during construction. Calder’s mobile, White Cascade, and Pepper’s steel sculpture, Phaedrus, were installed at the bank.

Russ married Georgia Henle in 1950. Besides his wife, he is survived by two daughters, Gail Connor Roche and Donna Lee Connor, and four grandchildren.

Services: A family gathering will be held sometime in August at the Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown.

Contributions in his name may be made to the D. Russell Connor Fund c/o the Institute of Jazz Studies, 185 University Ave., Newark, N.J. 07102.

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Review: “DO NOT SELL AT ANY PRICE: THE WILD, OBSESSIVE HUNT FOR THE WORLD’S RAREST 78 RPM RECORDS,” by AMANDA PETRUSICH | JAZZ LIVES

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http://jazzlives.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/quirky-curious-wise-do-not-sell-at-any-price-the-wild-obsessive-hunt-for-the-worlds-rarest-78-rpm-records-by-amanda-petrusich/

** QUIRKY, CURIOUS, WISE: “DO NOT SELL AT ANY PRICE: THE WILD, OBSESSIVE HUNT FOR THE WORLD’S RAREST 78 RPM RECORDS,” by AMANDA PETRUSICH
————————————————————

About one-third of the way through Amanda Petrusich’s new book, I became convinced that its author was, as the British say, daft. Mildly unhinged. Charmingly irrational. I say this as a badge of honor, not an insult. It was in the middle of the chapter where Petrusich (normal-looking, quite attractive in the author’s photo) had gone through scuba training to dive into the river in Grafton, Wisconsin, near the Paramount Records factory — defunct for eighty years — in search of the rare records and Paramount ephemera that legend has it the employees had tossed into the waters.

https://jazzlives.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/do-not-sell.jpg

Although no record in the world would ever entice me into a wetsuit, I thought, “This is a kind of devotion to the cause that makes great — if slightly unstable — art.”

I had already been entranced by Petrusich’s book while she was on dry land. I am not an stereotypical record collector — I prefer to encounter jazz recordings serendiptiously — but I liked Petrusich’s manner and approach from the first pages. For one thing, she steadfastly refuses to satirize, to stand back at a mocking distance from the subject or from the figures she chronicles. She does comment on the stereotype — overly pale men who spend their lives indoors and often below ground level, but Petrusich not only treats her subjects with interest and deference, but with affectionate respect . . . and becomes one of them in her own fashion. Her writing is lively, and the book rarely lingers for long on one obsession or the next (at times, it had the snap of a series of New Yorker mini-profiles).

The book is never a slow-moving history of the field (although she does touch on some of its legendary figures, such as James McKune and Big Joe Clauberg, Harry Smith and his Anthology) but its whimsical expansiveness leaves a reader feeling elated rather than deprived. I wish I could have time-traveled Petrusich back to the mid-Seventies gatherings of collectors at the Prince George Hotel in New York City, but she has been to the New Jersey Jazz Record Collectors’ Bash, so that will do. At more than one point, I thought, “I could certainly tell her stories of collectors,” but I suspect that my reaction is far from unusual.

I should alert JAZZ LIVES readers that Petrusich’s fascination has almost nothing to do with the objects of the jazz lover’s sacred quest. ZULUS BALL does not rate a mention here, nor do the Bix Old Gold broadcast acetates, or the “little silver record” of Lester Young that Jo Jones talked about.

Petrusich is captivated by rural blues — of the sort recorded by Paramount before the company folded in 1932 — and she has her first epiphany listening to Mississippi John Hurt’s BIG LEG BLUES with collector John Heneghan. But what saves this endearingly wandering narrative from being One Woman’s Descent Into The Maelstrom is both Petrusich’s light touch and her willingness to ask deeper philosophical questions about collecting, music, and our perceptions of both.

For all its amiability, DO NOT SELL AT ANY PRICE is a deeply serious book that — sometimes indirectly, other times head-on — asks hard questions about what makes an object valuable, and what drives certain people to amass such objects, both in what we see of them and what they see of themselves.

Anyone reading this book who is new to record collecting will find it impossible to look at a 78 rpm record the same way again — even the dullest one — without sensing its almost mystical electrical power to entice. (I write this, fully aware that I already knew how a blandly labeled RECORDS paper folio in a shelf at Goodwill may contain objects that would increase my pulse rate.)

A pause, so that you can hear Petrusich’s own voice, while she muses over the gap between the music and the artifact, the sound and the shellac disc with its memorized matrix number, and tried to figure out where our feverish excitement comes from:

That chasm–between a studied response and a gut-borne one–seemed even more palpable in the specific context of prewar blues music, where the hunt for (and especially the subsequent analysis of) the records appeared to run directly counter to the lawless spirit of the work. With a few notable exceptions, blues music was rowdy and social, and its creators led brash, lustful lives. They drank and roamed and had reckless sex and occasionally stabbed each other in the throat. There was something incongruous about sitting in a dimly lit room, meticulously wiping dust and mold off a blues 78 and noting the serial number in an antique log book. Why not dance or sob or get wasted and kick something over? Some collectors, I knew, did exactly that, but for others, the experience of a rare blues record involved a kind of isolated studiousness, which of course was fine–there’s no wrong way to enjoy music, and I understood that certain contextual details could help crystallize a
bigger,richer picture of a song. But I continued to believe that the pathway that allowed human beings to appreciate and require music probably began in a more instinctual place (the heart, the stomach, the nether regions). Context was important, but it was never as essential–as compelling–to me as the way my entire central nervous system convulsed whenever Skip James opened his mouth.

Balancing such vividly evocative meditations — which open out into lovely elusive speculations — are the concrete, often hilarious markers in Petrusich’s quest: buying records with collector Chris King at a flea market in Hillsville, Virginia; visiting Pete Whelan amidst his rare palm trees and rarer records in Florida, talking with John Tefteller over lunch in Brooklyn, being admitted to Joe Bussard’s basement shrine to hear Black Patti 8030; looking through Don Wahle’s papers with Nathan Salsburg; talking about collectors with Ian Nagoski and with Bear Family’s Richard Weize.

As the book winds down — through “ethnic music” and cowboy throat-singing, a visit to the Southern Folklife Collection, a detour into SKOKIAAN, a few pages where Petrusich muses on the relations between autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and collecting, and finally visits from two people active in the contemporary New York City world, phonograph collector / expert exhibitor Michael Cunella and musician / collector Jerron Paxton — I confess my jazz self became slightly restless. “Couldn’t you have written about just one person who collects Leon Roppolo?” I muttered to myself. But Petrusich’s many narratives are so sweetly compelling — vivid in their understated way — that I forgave her that omission. And the book ends with yet another epiphany, when Petrusich encounters the “new” set of Paramount Records issues:

I felt suddenly and fiercely protective of a subculture I had no real claim to. I wanted 78s to continue offering me–and all the people I’d met–a private antidote to an accelerated, carnivorous world. I didn’t want them to become another part of that world. I wanted them to stay ours.

I do not know if Petrusich’s fierce protectiveness is possible or plausible, or even desirable. I understand it completely: so much of the lure of collecting these artifacts is the secret, even snobbish delight one can take in moving so far outside the mainstream as to require subtitles, a translator. But I wonder if the world would be happier if everyone could listen to Charley Patton 78s while making breakfast.

And I wonder if Petrusich will check in with us in ten years. Has she purchased a turntable on which to play her recent beloved acquisitions? I hope so. It would sadden me immensely if I learned, through whatever avenue one learns such things, that she had thrown it all over for a smartphone with a larger memory for music and a new delight in, say, swizzle sticks or first editions of Yeats. But I think this won’t happen. Among its other virtues, and they are numerous, DO NOT SELL AT ANY PRICE is the journal of a spiritual enlightenment, a finding of a series of personal truths. And that is always fascinating to read.

Much, if not all, of the music Petrusich falls in love with in this book is either outside my sphere of pleasure or I am ignorant of it. But before I had read thirty pages of this book, I was already recommending it to people who love the music and the records. I recommend it to you as a deep, elegantly quirky pleasure, whose music reverberates long after one has finished reading it.

May your happiness increase!

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Conversation: Jazz Musician Jason Moran | Art Beat | PBS NewsHour

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** Conversation: Jazz Musician Jason Moran
————————————————————

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The Machine That’s Saving the History of Recorded Sound – Adrienne LaFrance – The Atlantic

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http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/06/how-a-machine-in-the-basement-of-the-library-of-congress-is-saving-the-history-of-recorded-sound/372723/

** The Machine That’s Saving the History of Recorded Sound
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Digital conservation specialist Peter Alyea at the Library of Congress. (Shealah Craighead/Library of Congress)

When recorded sound was in its infancy, more than 150 years ago, inventors still hadn’t answered what was, to them, a fundamental question:

What does sound look like?

They knew what sound sounded like, of course, and even what it felt like but what would it mean to see sound on paper? It was this question that inspired the French inventor Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville to design the phonoautograph, which is widely considered the earliest sound-recording machine. His theory was that if he could build a device that transcribed sound, he could read sound the way we read text.

“No one had really looked at sound waveforms before so he didn’t really know,” said Peter Alyea, a digital conservation specialist at the Library of Congress. “So he created basically what is, in current and modern terms, an oscilloscope.”
Phonoautograph circa 1860. (Wikimedia Commons)

De Martinville’s device, modeled after the human ear canal, worked by having a stylus attached to a piece of parchment. “And so he just etched it with a diaphragm that would vibrate a little hog’s bristle as he spoke into it,” Alyea said. “He wasn’t interested in actually recording sound and playing it back, he was interested in recording sound so he could look at it. He thought he could read the waveforms. He thought he could take someone speaking and transcribe something like, ‘The cow jumped over the moon.'”

The inventor found, of course, that sound waves couldn’t be read like text. The visual representation of sound varies based on amplification, not enunciation. But through his experiment, de Martinville ushered in a new era of recorded sound, the implications of which are too enmeshed in the technological world as we now know it to fully appreciate.

Here’s de Martinville’s April 9, 1860 recording of the French folksong, “Au Clair de la Lune,” the earliest known recording of a human voice:

The clip is an odd and ethereal treasure of de Martinville’s legacy. But more than that, it is a reminder of the inherent physicality of recorded sound. It took the engineering of new machinery to capture that wobbly strain at all, and more machinery still to resurrect it 148 years later.

“Au Clair de la Lune” is all over the Internet now, having proliferated digitally and endlessly since it was first discovered in 2008. (Before that, researchers believed a recording of Thomas Edison had made the earliest recording in the 1870s.) But in order for de Martinville’s lost 20 seconds of melody to be found for the Internet age, scientists first had to figure out a way to turn his fragile paper recording—the transcription of sound de Martinville hoped he would be able to read—back into song that could be heard.

To do so, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory used a combination of optical imaging and high-resolution scanning, then converted the patterns they captured into readable—that is, playable—sound. The technology, originally developed by particle physicists, allows for optically recovering sound recordings without touching the medium on which the sound is recorded. This technique has been around for more than a decade now. The machine invented at Berkley is now, through a partnership, the center of sound preservation efforts at the Library of Congress.

“They called it IRENE because the first recording they did an image of was ‘Goodnight, Irene (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpZ1Cx1IcC0&feature=kp) ,’ by the Weavers,” Alyea told me. “And then they made it a reverse acronym and decided it would stand for Image, Reconstruct, Erase Noise, Etcetera.”
Close-up of vinyl record (flickr/Stewart Black)

IRENE (http://irene.lbl.gov/) lives in the cool basement of the library’s James Madison building. It looks, well, like a machine—all metal and lasers and motor—a little bit like a cross between a microscope and the guts of a home printer. How IRENE works: It’s basically a digital-imaging device. So, say you have a vinyl record you want to preserve. IRENE scans the topography of the disc, and sends the images it produces to a computer. Separate software on the computer then converts those images into sound.

“You have optics that magnify the surface of the disc,” Alyea said. “You have a laser that actually drives a motor that moves the whole system up and down like the autofocus on your camera. Most of these discs are not flat at all and there’s a fairly small area of focus. Some light comes in here and is split and shone directly on the surface of the disc, and then there’s a camera.” More simply, IRENE is a mapping device that tracks the terrain of a recorded medium—like the pattern of the grooves etched onto a flat vinyl record.

The device knows how to image the architecture of other recorded formats, too, including older shellac-coated vinyl, and glass records like the ones made during the rationing of World War II. In the ten years since IRENE was invented, institutions have discovered a spate of esoteric formats and unknown recordings, strange items in long-forgotten collections that haven’t even been catalogued.

“These whole different ranges of formats that IRENE can save that are in people’s collections, and people don’t even know what’s on them,” said Fenella France, the chief of the preservation research and testing at the Library of Congress. “Things keep coming out of the woodwork.”

IRENE is even able to resuscitate the sound recorded to wax cylinders from the late 19th century, which became the first medium for commercially recorded sound.
New York Tribune ad, October 1908 (Library of Congress)

People played them on phonographs, and certain kinds of wax were soft enough to be shaved down, making the cylinders rewritable.
New York Tribune ad, January 1911 (Library of Congress)

Whereas the topography of a record is like a riverbed, a cylinder’s recording is etched around its circumference like a skyline—the stylus would trace the path of a cylinder by going up and down rather than side to side like on a vinyl record—which means imaging a cylinder requires different motion than would be required for a record. For a record, a groove’s squiggly line is what determines the sound you hear. With a cylinder, the depth of the groove is what counts. “So it has something called a confocal probe that uses a lens that focuses light at different distances to get three-dimensional data,” Alyea said. If you tried to image a cylinder the way you image a vinyl record, “all you’d see would be a straight line,” he said.

In 2012, a team of curators at the Smithsonian worked at the Library to retrieve the audio from a set of experimental recordings made by telephone pioneer Alexander Graham Bell in the 1880s. What they uncovered was remarkable. “A recording made on a brass disc covered with wax yielded a recitation from ‘Hamlet,'” Carlene Stephens, a curator at the Smithsonian, told the Library of Congress in 2012 (http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2012/03/unlocking-sounds-of-the-past/) . “A glass photodisc features the word ‘ba-ro-me-ter’ enunciated over and over…It made the hair stand up on the back of my neck. It was so thrilling. It was so eerie. It was so much a glimpse into a time period we have never heard from before, ever.”

IRENE has also enabled scientists to piece together complete sound from broken media, including minor glitches like vinyl imperfections and major damage like records that are physically broken in half or worse. Here’s a clip of a 1940s song that researchers reassembled with software after imaging a shellac disc that was smashed into six separate pieces:

The clicks, pops, and skips of regular vinyl wear don’t interfere with the sound IRENE images because the machine never touches the medium the way the stylus on a record player would. “So when you play a damaged record with a stylus, you get a skip in the groove,” Alyea said. “This is not a problem with IRENE because IRENE just sees that as a small little blemish and just goes right through it.”

For more severe degradation or damage, it’s time consuming—but possible!—for IRENE to image shards of a record or cylinder separately, then piece back together full recordings using computer software. Eventually, scientists say, IRENE could be hooked up to additional 3D printing technology so that sound retrieved from an old format could be preserved and reprinted onto something new. But the resolution isn’t quite where it needs to be. (“We’re imaging on the micron level and you can’t quite do that with a printer,” Alyea told me. “But it certainly seems quite feasible that at some point in the near future you’d be able to print it out. That’d be fun.”) In the meantime, the library is in the process of establishing workflow so it can figure out which recordings to prioritize and, hopefully, save as much historically valuable sound as possible.

In the scope of human history, the era of recorded sound is a blip—and yet the volume and fragility of what’s been created in that time is overwhelming. Already the Library of Congress is hard at work on the preservation of CDs (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/05/the-library-of-congress-wants-to-destroy-your-old-cds-for-science/370804/) , and the newest wave of digitized recordings presents a litany of fresh preservation challenges. The perceived dichotomy, though—this idea that there’s analog on one side and digital on the other—is all wrong. Ancient formats and modern formats may look different but they both require hardware, machinery you can hold in your hands.

“They’re very different kinds of formats, but they’re all physical,” Alyea said. “Still, even with digital data, there’s no way to just—I mean, in theory you could have someone sit down and memorize all the values or something, but then it’s in their brain. So with recorded sound, it’s always something physical.”

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▶ 4400 Vinyl Record 45 rpm DJ Dream Collection for sale – YouTube

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** 4400 Vinyl Record 45 rpm DJ Dream Collection for sale
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Billy Taylor Street Naming

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PRESS RELEASE – Street Naming Ceremony Honoring Dr. Billy Taylor
http://jazztimes.com/articles/132022-dr-billy-taylor-street-naming-ceremony-to-take-place-june-21
http://jazztimes.com/articles/132022-dr-billy-taylor-street-naming-ceremony-to-take-place-june-21

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Street Naming Ceremony Honoring Dr. Billy Taylor

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PRESS RELEASE – Street Naming Ceremony Honoring Dr. Billy Taylor

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Alan Douglas, Who Mined Hendrix Archive, Dies at 82 – NYTimes.com

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/15/arts/music/alan-douglas-who-mined-hendrix-archive-dies-at-82.html

** Alan Douglas, Who Mined Hendrix Archive, Dies at 82
————————————————————

Photo
Alan Douglas

Alan Douglas, a music producer and packager who worked with jazz greats like Duke Ellington, recorded the prerap stylings of the Last Poets and published a book of monologues by Lenny Bruce — but who is best known as a controversial steward of the legacy of Jimi Hendrix — died on June 7 at his home in Paris. He was 82.

The cause was complications after a fall, his daughter Kirby Veevers said.

A jazz fan from boyhood with an ear for the new, Mr. Douglas spent his career trying to keep his favorite sounds in circulation and the musicians who made them part of the pop culture discourse. His taste was sophisticated though not necessarily avant-garde, and though he strove to push musicians to do their most imaginative work, he wasn’t interested so much in challenging listeners as he was in attracting more of them.

As a producer primarily for United Artists Records in the early 1960s and later for his own label, Douglas Records, Mr. Douglas ushered into the world a number of notable albums, among them “Money Jungle” (1963), a studio collaboration of Ellington, the bassist Charles Mingus and the drummer Max Roach; two early albums by the influential jazz-rock guitarist John McLaughlin, “Devotion” and “My Goal’s Beyond”; and “The Last Poets,” a self-titled album that introduced a group of street chanters whose rhythmic incantations and angry political verses anticipated hip-hop.
Photo

Mr. Douglas is best known as a controversial steward of the legacy of Jimi Hendrix. Credit Reprise

“He and I had our differences and ups and downs; however, he took a chance on us when no one else would,” Umar Bin Hassan, an original member of the Last Poets, said in a statement about Mr. Douglas after his death, adding, “Whether you liked him or didn’t you had to admit he was one of the giants in what he did, and that was to put out responsible, intelligent and remarkable music.”

Hendrix, who died in 1970, had a brief friendship with Mr. Douglas, who was later hired to go through the many hours of unreleased recordings the guitarist left behind. The anger Mr. Douglas stirred in many Hendrix fans began in 1975, when he released two albums, “Crash Landing” and “Midnight Lightning,” culled from these tapes; most critics found them, or at least parts of them, worthwhile, but trouble erupted with the revelation that in remixing the originals, Mr. Douglas had replaced tracks backing Hendrix’s guitar with newly recorded music by other players.

In the wake of the outcry, his explanation was always that he wanted Hendrix’s music to find its way to a new audience at a time when his star had begun to fade; the playing behind him on the tapes was, by Mr. Douglas’s lights, substandard, and failed to showcase Hendrix to the best advantage. But among rock critics and fans, the debate lingered for years.

“If you take this work at face value, without the baggage of what ‘producer’ Alan Douglas did to the tapes,” Joe Viglione wrote in a review on the website AllMusic that also disparaged a co-producer, Tony Bongiovi, “it’s still Hendrix. Maybe God allowed the series of albums to happen so the world could see Hendrix’s work could survive doctoring and musicians jamming with his art after the fact.”
Continue reading the main story

In Mr. Douglas’s defense, the rock journalist and critic John Masouri wrote a long piece in 2011 on the website densesignals.com (http://densesignals.com/) , calling Mr. Douglas “one of our last great musical visionaries.” Of the Hendrix kerfuffle, he wrote that Mr. Douglas’s decision to improve the original tracks was the right one.

“Wisely, he’d also edited out passages where Jimi had toyed with a riff repeatedly, searching for just the right phrase,” Mr. Masouri wrote. “All things considered, it’s highly unlikely that Hendrix would have sanctioned the release of poorly executed material, yet the die was cast, and the producer has been branded a controversial figure ever since.”

Alan Douglas Rubenstein was born in Chelsea, Mass., on July 20, 1931, to William Rubenstein and the former Rose Silbert. His father was a junk seller who eventually started a successful mattress manufacturing business. Alan graduated from a local high school and played football briefly in college — at Colby in Maine and the University of Miami — though he never graduated. He received a medical discharge from the Army after an abbreviated period of service.

He worked for Roulette Records in New York and Barclay Records in Paris before becoming head of the jazz department at United Artists, where he worked with the singer Betty Carter, the flutist Herbie Mann and others. Later, at the short-lived FM Records, he recorded two albums by the celebrated avant-garde saxophonist Eric Dolphy.

When FM dissolved, he started his own company. His first acquisition was the rights to Lenny Bruce’s written monologues and tapes, which were then published as “The Essential Lenny Bruce.” He also published work by Timothy Leary. In 1969, after seeing the Last Poets on television, he tracked them down performing on a run-down basketball court in Harlem and brought them right to the recording studio.

Mr. Douglas met Hendrix in 1969; they encountered each other at the Woodstock festival (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/w/woodstock_music_festivals/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier) and also through the intervention of Stella Benabou, Mr. Douglas’s wife at the time, who owned a clothing store in Manhattan where Hendrix liked to shop. Mr. Douglas arranged several recording sessions with him and other musicians, some of which appear on the album “Nine to the Universe,” released in 1980.

In 1995, a court settlement took the rights to the Hendrix archive from Mr. Douglas and awarded them to Hendrix’s father, Al. Years of legal wrangling ensued, and Mr. Douglas was eventually able to retain the right to compile Hendrix’s writings into a book and to make a documentary film about him. Both are titled “Starting at Zero.” (http://starting-at-zero.com/film/) The book was published last fall; the film has yet to be released.

Mr. Douglas was married four times. In addition to Ms. Veevers, he is survived by his wife, Lucia Solazzi; a brother, Jerry Douglas; a sister, Beverly Shuman; another daughter, Solo Douglas; a stepson, Darnell Greene; and three grandsons.

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Diggin’ In The Crates With A Legend

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It’s not often you get to share the bins with a bonafide music legend, but there was the great maestro and NEA Jazz Master Eddie Palmeri (http://eddiepalmierimusic.com/) ‘digging in the crates’ at Fred Falk’s SECOND SATURDAY Record & CD Show (http://www.showsandexpos.com/rswayne.htm) in Wayne, NJ.

For all you record freaks out there come to the 40th Annual Jazz Record Collectors’ Bash (http://www.jazzbash.net/) June 27th – 28th, 2014

Who knows you may just bump into a legend.

78s, LPs, CDs & Memorabilia – Plus
Buy, Sell, Swap, Trade, Schmooze
Rare Jazz Films
Please pass the word to all your Vinyl Collecting Friends!
Hilton Woodbridge
120 Wood Avenue South
Iselin, NJ 08830

General admission: $20.00 covers buyer’s admission for two days (Friday & Saturday).

After 5:00 p.m. Friday (including Saturday reentry) and all day Saturday admission is $10.00.

Early buyers will be admitted Thursday evening after 7:30 pm for $40.00.

Doors open 8:00 a.m. on Friday & Saturday.

Special hotel room rate of $119 per night, Thursday through Saturday. For reservations, call hotel directly and mention Jazz Bash: 1-732-494-6200.http://www.hiltonwoodbridge.com (http://www.hiltonwoodbridge.com/)

More information at:

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or contact:

Art Zimmerman

P. O. Box 158

Jericho, NY 11753-0158

zimrecords@msn.com (mailto:zimrecords@msn.com)

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Jazz Singer Jimmy Scott Dies at 88 – Hollywood Reporter

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/14/arts/music/jimmy-scott-singer-whose-star-rose-late-dies-at-88.html?%00%2C%A0%D6%A4%94%934%0A%EBc%A1%E4%B1f%ACrN%98%00%07%81%C0%03y%A6%B1=&emc%18%9A%9EU%00%DD%8C%9A%074%24v=&nlid=16833052&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/14/arts/music/jimmy-scott-singer-whose-star-rose-late-dies-at-88.html?%00%2C%A0%D6%A4%94%934%0A%EBc%A1%E4%B1f%ACrN%98%00%07%81%C0%03y%A6%B1=&emc%18%9A%9EU%00%DD%8C%9A%074%24v=&nlid=16833052&_r=0)

** Jimmy Scott, Singer Whose Star Rose Late, Dies at 88
————————————————————

Photo
Jimmy Scott performing at Lincoln Center’s Kaplan Penthouse in 2001. Credit Jack Vartoogian for The New York Times

Jimmy Scott, a jazz singer whose distinctively plaintive delivery and unusually high-pitched voice earned him a loyal following and, late in life, a taste of bona fide stardom, died on Thursday at his home in Las Vegas. He was 88.

The cause was cardiac arrest, his wife, Jeanie Scott, said.

Mr. Scott’s career finished on a high note, with steady work from the early 1990s on, as well as a Grammy (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/g/grammy_awards/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier) nomination, glowing reviews and praise from well-known fellow performers like Madonna, who called him “the only singer who makes me cry.” But the first four decades of his career were checkered, with long periods of inactivity and more lows than highs.

After enjoying sporadic success in the 1950s, he had almost none in the 1960s. Albums he recorded for major labels in 1962 and 1969, which might have jump-started his career, were quickly withdrawn from the market when another company claimed to have him under contract. He virtually stopped performing in the 1970s and made no records between 1975 and 1990.
Photo
Mr. Scott in a portrait from the early 1950s. Credit Little Jimmy Scott Collection

But if Mr. Scott spent most of his career in relative obscurity, he always had a core of fiercely devoted fans — among them many prominent vocalists who cited him as an influence, including Marvin Gaye, Frankie Valli and Nancy Wilson.

The fact that both men and women considered themselves Mr. Scott’s disciples is not surprising: because of a rare genetic condition called Kallmann syndrome, (http://www.kallmanns.org/) which caused his body to stop maturing before he reached puberty, Mr. Scott’s voice never changed, and he remained an eerie, androgynous alto his whole life.

Standing 4-foot-11, with a hairless face to match his boyish voice, he was originally billed as Little Jimmy Scott, and he was presented to audiences as a child until well into his 20s. In his mid-30s he unexpectedly grew eight inches taller and, although he otherwise remained physically unchanged, doctors told him an operation might stimulate his hormonal development. He decided against it.

“I was afraid of entering uncharted territory,” Mr. Scott told David Ritz, the author of “Faith in Time: The Life of Jimmy Scott” (2002). “Besides, fooling with my hormones might mean changing my voice. Whatever the problems that came with the deficiency, my voice was the one thing I could count on.”

Mr. Scott’s condition left him incapable of reproduction.

James Victor Scott was born on July 17, 1925, in Cleveland. The third of 10 children, he lived in orphanages and foster homes after his mother was killed in a car accident when he was 13. After singing in local nightclubs for a few years, he went on the road in 1945 with a vaudeville-style show headed by Estella Young, a dancer and contortionist. He moved to New York City in 1947 and joined Lionel Hampton’s band a year later.

His 1950 recording of “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srP6mod9lCo) with Hampton set the pattern for his later work. A mournful ballad of love gone wrong, the song was delivered with feverish intensity and idiosyncratic, behind-the-beat phrasing. The record was a hit, but because it was credited on the label simply to “Lionel Hampton, vocal with orchestra,” few people knew that Mr. Scott was the singer.
Continue reading the main story

Recordings later in the decade for the Roost and Savoy labels helped establish his name. But with a style somewhere between jazz and rhythm and blues and a voice somewhere between male and female, he found it difficult to gain a foothold in the marketplace.
Photo

Mr. Scott in 2006. Credit Kate Simon

The vagaries of the record business did not help. An album he recorded for Ray Charles’s Tangerine label in 1962, featuring Charles on piano and a string section, garnered radio play and, with national distribution from ABC Records, seemed likely to expand his audience. But Herman Lubinsky, the owner of Savoy Records, threatened legal action to block its release, claiming he still had Mr. Scott under contract. A similar fate befell “The Source,” an album Mr. Scott made for Atlantic seven years later.

By then, a frustrated Mr. Scott had moved back to Cleveland, where he held a variety of nonmusical jobs, including cook, hotel clerk and nurse’s aide, for the better part of two decades, although he continued to perform occasionally and even recorded an album for Savoy in 1975.

“When the gig ain’t there, you still got to pay the rent,” he told The New York Times Magazine (http://www.nytimes.com/2000/08/27/magazine/the-ballad-of-little-jimmy-scott.html) in 2000. “I learned that a long time ago.”

In 1984, encouraged by the woman who would soon become his fourth wife, Mr. Scott moved east and began to get nightclub bookings in Newark and New York City. He released a self-produced album in 1990. But despite his renewed commitment to music, his profile remained low until 1991, when he was signed to Sire Records, a rock-oriented Warner Brothers subsidiary, on the strength of his performance of “Someone to Watch Over Me” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtqGpgdD_6k) at the funeral of the songwriter Doc Pomus (http://www.nytimes.com/1991/03/15/obituaries/jerome-doc-pomus-65-lyricist-for-some-of-rock-s-greatest-hits.html) , an old friend.

On his first Sire album, “All the Way,” he sang classic love songs by the likes of Porter and Gershwin, accompanied by first-rank jazz musicians. The album garnered strong reviews, sold well and was nominated for a Grammy Award.

After that, Mr. Scott never wanted for work. He sang at one of President Bill Clinton’s inaugural balls in 1993. He became a popular concert attraction in Europe and Japan. He sang on the soundtrack of “Philadelphia” and other movies and acted in the independent film “Chelsea Walls” in 2001. He also appeared in an episode of the cult television series “Twin Peaks.”

Mr. Scott continued to record into the 21st century, notably for the Milestone label, and to perform. His last appearance was in June 2012 at the Blue Note in Greenwich Village. In 2007, he was named a Jazz Master (http://arts.gov/honors/jazz/jimmy-scott) by the National Endowment for the Arts and a Living Jazz Legend by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington.

Mr. Scott married Jeanie McCarthy, his fifth wife, in 2003. Besides her, he is survived by a son, Tracy Porter; three sisters, Nadine Walker, Betsy Jones and Elsa Scott; and a brother, Roger Scott.

Finding himself in demand a half-century after he first sang in front of an audience, Mr. Scott was grateful but philosophical.

“I appreciate the fact that these things are finally happening for me,” he told The Plain Dealer in Cleveland in 1997, “but I wish they could have happened earlier in my career so I could have enjoyed the retiring years much better.” Still, he conceded, “in show business, generally you don’t retire. If you love it, that is, you’re in it forever anyway.”

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Jazz Singer Jimmy Scott Dies at 88 – Hollywood Reporter

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** Jazz Singer Jimmy Scott Dies at 88
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1:45 PM PDT 6/13/2014 by Mitch Myers
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Jimmy Scott 2004 P
Associated Press
Jimmy Scott

** He famously made an on-screen appearance on the finale of “Twin Peaks” to sing “Sycamore Trees,” a song co-written by the show’s creator David Lynch.
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Jimmy Scott, the jazz star whose small stature, romantic phrasing and distinctly high voice helped make him one of the most unique vocal stylists of his era, died in his sleep on Thursday at his home in Las Vegas. The singer was 88.
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•Obituaries (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/topic/obituaries)

His death was confirmed by his biographer,David Ritz, according to the Washington Post (http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/jimmy-scott-hard-luck-singer-with-a-haunting-voice-dies-at-88/2014/06/13/270725b6-48c3-11e3-a196-3544a03c2351_story.html) .

James Victor Scott came into this world on July 17, 1925, and considering the struggles that he faced in his professional and personal life, the empathy his unique soprano voice conveyed was impressive, generous, and even noble. Jimmy and his brother Kenny were just two of ten children born to Arthur Scott and his wife Justine in Cleveland, Ohio. As the two brothers were approaching puberty it was determined that they both suffered from a rare hormonal deficiency called Kallmann’s Syndrome, which caused them to experience a sustained state of (physical) pre-adolescence. It was this sad and unusual circumstance that contributed to Jimmy Scott’s high-pitched voice.

PHOTOS Hollywood’s Notable Deaths of 2014 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/gallery/hollywoods-notable-deaths-2014-674642)

Scott transformed that voice into a marvelous musical instrument, one that was as expressive and as nuanced as any other in the history of jazz. “Little” Jimmy Scott’s first taste of fame occurred in 1949 when he got a job singing with Lionel Hampton and His Orchestra but it wasn’t until January 1950 that Jimmy and the Hampton band recorded Scott’s one and only hit, “Everybody’s Somebody’sFool.”

Jimmy Scott began releasing records under his own name in the 1950s but in the decades that followed he was up and down, in and out, gone and back, and for a time, literally lost to the music business. A one-time contemporary of great talents like Charlie Parker and Billie Holiday, as well as more obscure musicians like Big Maybelle, he remained a jazz singer nonpareil across seven decades.

Scott’s many different “comebacks” over the years served as a testimonial to his bad luck and his endurance, as well as his consistency as a recording artist. He was once “rediscovered” singing at the funeral of his friend Doc Pomus, and was signed to Sire Records by Seymour Stein, making the 1992 recording, All The Way. Scott sang on the wonderfully poignant Lou Reed album, Magic and Loss and appeared on David Lynch’s cult program Twin Peaks, singing the song “Sycamore Tree,” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIXPG8NR5iI) co-written by the show’s creator. After Sire Records, Scott made several worthwhile albums on the Milestone jazz label until the early 2000s. In 2007, Jimmy Scott was named a NEA Jazz Master.

STORY Ray Davies, Donovan and Graham Gouldman Among Those Inducted Into Songwriters Hall of Fame (http://hollywoodreporter.com/news/ray-davies-donovan-graham-gouldman-711740)

Although he lived in obscurity for decades, new generations repeatedly discovered the legend of Jimmy Scott — everyone from Ray Charles to Marvin Gaye to David Byrne lauded him. In 2002 there was a documentary film produced entitled Jimmy Scott: If You Only Knew. In David Ritz’s as-told-to biography, Faith In Time: The Life Of Jimmy Scott, the singer is contextualized alongside brilliant saxophonists Lester Young and Stan Getz, as well as legendary friends like Bird and Lady Day. Much like his talented peers, Little Jimmy Scott inhabited a world where the line between thought and expression dissolved night after night and year after year. There won’t be another like him again.

Scott moved from Cleveland to Las Vegas in 2007 for health reasons.

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Jazz Articles: Singer Jimmy Scott Dies at 88 – By Jeff Tamarkin — Jazz Articles

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** Singer Jimmy Scott Dies at 88
————————————————————

Jimmy Scott, whose distinctively high soprano voice—caused by a rare genetic condition called Kallmann’s syndrome—gave his music a purity and youthfulness even into old age, died June 12 in his sleep at his Las Vegas home. His death, the cause of which has not yet been revealed, was confirmed by a family friend. Scott was 88.

Born James Victor Scott in Cleveland, Ohio, on July 17, 1925, one of 10 children, “Little” Jimmy Scott, as he was known early in his career, was born with the aforementioned condition, which stunted his physical growth and made him unable to reach puberty. As a result, Scott’s singing voice was unusually high for an adult male, however he used it to his advantage onstage and in the recordings he made beginning in the late 1940s with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra, Charlie Parker and others. Scott’s appeal crossed over from jazz into the nascent rhythm and blues world, and his 1950 Decca single with Hampton, “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool,” landed in the Billboard R&B top 10 (Scott was not credited on the record label, however).

Scott began recording under his own name in 1951, releasing his debut leader album, Very Truly Yours, on Savoy in 1955. But by the early 1960s, after an album he recorded for Ray Charles’ label was withdrawn due to contractual issues, he had largely given up music and begun working at various jobs outside of the entertainment industry. He released new albums in 1969 and 1975 but they went unnoticed.

Scott began performing in clubs again in 1985, and in 1991, he sang at the funeral of his longtime friend, songwriter Doc Pomus, and was subsequently approached by Sire Records chief Seymour Stein, who expressed an interest in recording Scott again. Scott released an album titled All the Way in 1992, and subsequent interest in the vocalist mushroomed. He was championed by rock artists such as Lou Reed (Scott sang on Reed’s Magic and Loss album) and David Byrne, and director David Lynch used him both onscreen and in the soundtrack of his popular TV series Twin Peaks.

Scott continued to record for Sire, then for Milestone and other labels into the early 2000s. A documentary film, Jimmy Scott: If You Only Knew, was produced in 2002 and shown on PBS stations. A biography, Faith in Time: The Life of Jimmy Scott (DaCapo), by David Ritz, was published that same year. Several compilation albums of Scott’s early and later work have been issued by various labels, including the two-CD Someone To Watch Over Me, on Warner Bros., and a Rhino collection, Lost and Found. Jimmy Scott was named an NEA Jazz Master in 2007.

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June 19 –7 p.m. Panel Discussion: Jazz in the USA: On the 60th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival

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National Archives Public Programs
June 19
McGowan Theater

Jazz on a Summer’s Day &
Jazz in the USA: On the 60th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival

Thursday, June 19, at Noon and 7 p.m.
William G. McGowan Theater

On Thursday, June 19, the National Archives continues its Jazz at the National Archives series with a noontime screening of Jazz on a Summer’s Day and an evening panel discussion titled Jazz in the USA: On the 60th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival.

Noon Film Screening: Jazz on a Summer’s Day
In 1958, photographer Bert Stern produced and directed this chronicle of the Newport Jazz Festival. Featuring performances by Louis Armstrong, Anita O’Day, Mahalia Jackson, and Thelonious Monk, the film is filled with illuminating images of late 1950s America. (84 minutes.) George Wein, founder of the Newport Jazz Festival, will introduce the screening.

7 p.m. Panel Discussion: Jazz in the USA: On the 60th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival
For the 60th anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival, journalist Soledad O’Brien moderates a panel discussion with George Wein, founder of the Newport Jazz Festival; Dan Morgenstern, author, archivist, and NEA Jazz Master; and jazz musicians Jonathan Batiste and Christian McBride. Film clips of the 1960 festival (from the holdings of the National Archives) will complement the discussion.

Jazz at the National Archives is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Pictured: 1970 Newport Jazz Festival (The personal collection of George Wein)

For all Public Programs, (unless otherwise noted) please use the Special Events Entrance on the corner of 7th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW. Doors to the building open 45 minutes prior to the start of the program. Late seating will not be permitted 20 minutes after programs begin.

All events listed in the calendar are free unless otherwise noted.
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Archives to reserve your seats:
1. Register at www.archivesfoundation.org/events/
2. Print your email confirmation and bring it with you. Please plan to be in your seats by 15 minutes before start time or they may be released.
3. To reserve by phone, call 202-357-6814.

Walk-ins without reservations will be admitted, depending on available seats.

The National Archives is fully accessible. If you need to request an accommodation (for example, a sign language interpreter) for a public program please email public.program@nara.gov (mailto:public.program@nara.gov) or call 202-357-5000 at least two weeks prior to the event to ensure proper arrangements are secured. All building entrances are handicapped-accessible.

Books are available for purchase before or during book-related programs at a 15% discount. To purchase books before an event, please call 202-357-5271.

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Ruby Dee meets Fats Waller in “Jazztime Tale” – Oakland Jazz music | Examiner.com

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** Ruby Dee meets Fats Waller in “Jazztime Tale”
————————————————————

** See also
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* jazz (http://www.examiner.com/topic/jazz)
* Ruby Dee (http://www.examiner.com/topic/ruby-dee)
* Obituaries (http://www.examiner.com/topic/obituaries)
* Denzel Washington (http://www.examiner.com/topic/denzel-washington)
* Ossie Davis (http://www.examiner.com/topic/ossie-davis)
* Sidney Poitier (http://www.examiner.com/topic/sidney-poitier)

“Jazztime Tale”
“Jazztime Tale”
Brian McCoy (http://www.examiner.com/jazz-music-in-oakland/brian-mccoy) Oakland Jazz Music Examiner (http://www.examiner.com/jazz-music-in-oakland/brian-mccoy)
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June 12, 2014

News has come this afternoon of the death of actress Ruby Dee (http://www.examiner.com/topic/ruby-dee) . Here is the lead on her New York Times obit.

Ruby Dee, one of the most enduring actresses of theater and film, whose public profile and activist passions made her, along with her husband, Ossie Davis (http://www.examiner.com/topic/ossie-davis) , a leading advocate for civil rights both in show business and in the wider world, died on Wednesday at her home in New Rochelle, N.Y. She was 91.
A diminutive, placid beauty with a sense of persistent social distress and a restless, probing intelligence, Dee began her performing career in the 1940s, and it continued well into the 21st century. She was always a critical favorite though not often cast as a leading lady.
Her most successful central role was off Broadway, in the 1970 Athol Fugard drama, “Boesman and Lena,” about a pair of nomadic mixed-race South Africans, for which she received overwhelming praise. Her most famous performance came more than a decade earlier, in 1959, in a supporting role in “A Raisin in the Sun,” Lorraine Hansberry’s landmark drama about the quotidian struggle of a black family in Chicago at the dawn of the civil rights movement.

Dee’s other notable film roles include “The Jackie Robinson Story,” “No Way Out” (with Sidney Poitier (http://www.examiner.com/topic/sidney-poitier) ), “American Gangster” (withDenzel Washington (http://www.examiner.com/topic/denzel-washington) ) and Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing” and “Jungle Fever.” In 1968, she became the first black actress to be featured regularly on the titillating prime-time TV series “Peyton Place.”
Dee was raised in Harlem, an upbringing that served her well as the narrator of “Jazztime Tale,” Michael Sporn’s 1993 animated short spotlighting jazz (http://www.examiner.com/topic/jazz) and Fats Waller in particular. Here’s the L.A. Times’ original review.

Based on an original story by Maxine Fisher and narrated by actress Ruby Dee, “Jazztime Tale (http://www.fandor.com/films/jazztime_tale) ” is set in 1919 in New York’s Harlem. Billy Rowland supplies the voice for Fats.
Ten-year-old Thomas Waller is already a legend in his own neighborhood, and to a larger degree with many of the patrons of the district’s Lincoln Theater, where the boy shares piano duties with Miss Mullins playing accompaniment for the silent-movie shows. One of Waller’s neighbors is a young black girl named Lucinda, who is about 13 and enchanted by the new kind of striding jazz music she hears her chum playing on the upright in his parlor. “It makes you want to laugh,” she says.
In another part of Manhattan, a young white girl about Lucinda’s age lives with her talent-scout father. But with no mother, and her father away a large part of the time, Rose is lonely and feels neglected. One day her father tells her he is going to the evening show at the Lincoln Theater and will be late coming home.
Rose decides to tag along, and hides in the rear of her father’s auto. When he parks and goes to take his supper, she decides to explore this new neighborhood. Lost, and obviously somewhat out of place in the neighborhood, she meets Lucinda by chance.
The two girls take to each other at once, and Lucinda brings Rose home and introduces her to her rather startled mother and siblings who probably have never seen a white child that close up before. Rose’s family is on the way to the Lincoln. They leave word with the policeman on the beat that should he spy a man looking for a child, it will most likely be Rose’s father.
Meanwhile, in the last half of the show (a sterling segment done in black, whites and sepias, all in animation), when the organist for the entertainment part of the program fails to show, Thomas Waller sits in and plays the mighty organ accompaniment. But Fats cannot contain his joy, and to the consternation of the juggler on stage, begins playing jazz. The juggler’s plates survive, and the music brings down the house. Rose and her talent-scout father are reunited, and Fats . . . well, you’ll have to watch the video.

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Jazz Producer, Hendrix Confidant Alan Douglas Dies – Speakeasy – WSJ

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** Jazz Producer, Hendrix Confidant Alan Douglas Dies
————————————————————

The late Alan Douglas, friend and producer of Jimi Hendrix.
Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal

By the time he befriended Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village, Alan Douglas was already an established producer of jazz luminaries.

Mr. Douglas, who died on June 7 at 82 years old in Paris due to complications from a fall, one of his daughter said, had a knack for combining unlikely talents such as Duke Ellington with Charles Mingus and Max Roach, who were of different generations and styles.

Mr. Douglas, who headed United Artists’ jazz division, also worked with Art Blakey and Betty Carter, and made a posthumous recording with his friend Billie Holiday. He issued a series of DVDs of live shows by such varied talents as Celia Cruz, George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic and B.B. King.

Mr. Douglas also was steeped in the 1960s counterculture. He discovered and produced The Last Poets, a Harlem-based cooperative of poets and musicians that presaged the hip-hop movement, and published books and recordings by Timothy Leary, Lenny Bruce and Alejandro Jodorowksy.

But it was Mr. Douglas’s association with Mr. Hendrix starting in 1969 when the guitarist lived a few blocks away in New York’s Greenwich Village that brought him the most renown—and controversy.

Mr. Douglas met Mr. Hendrix through his second of four wives, the former Stella Benabou, who owned a hippie clothing shop, the Moroccan-born former wife said.

“He used to go to my wife’s store to buy those leather jackets everybody used to have,” Mr. Douglas said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal last year. “So, I came home from a dinner one night and he was sitting there on my kitchen. My wife and he were good friends.”

Months later, of the Woodstock music festival, Mr. Douglas said, “Jimi was supposed to be the last performer of the evening. At midnight. But it was 4 a.m. and he still hadn’t gone on stage yet. So, we were backstage hanging out. He finally went on at 7am.”

The two men went on to work closely together in Mr. Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios in the Village and in Mr. Douglas’s midtown office, and began discussing new, more jazzy directions.

One such recording session they planned involved trumpeter Miles Davis, keyboardist Larry Young and drummer Tony Williams, and another was with pianist and composer Gil Evans, said Ross Firestone, a longtime friend and colleague of Mr. Douglas’s.

“They were developing all sorts of projects that would have been quite interesting,” Mr. Firestone said.

Mr. Hendrix’s unexpected death in London in 1970 scuttled those plans. But Mr. Douglas obtained the rights to manage the late guitarist’s creative legacy, which he did over the next quarter century.

In several albums, Mr. Douglas mixed Mr. Hendrix’s guitar and voice recordings with newly recorded studio musicians because he was dissatisfied with the quality of the original. The technique drew fire from Hendrix purists, who felt the original recordings shouldn’t have been trifled with; some of them also contended that the recordings were never intended to be released.

Mr. Douglas’s supporters say his Hendrix releases were impeccably produced, unlike many of the hundreds of shoddy bootleg Hendrix albums, and helped popularize Hendrix among a new younger generation. In the Journal interview, Mr. Douglas said, “We got accused of manipulation but it was a manipulation with a good and honest heart.”

A 1995 court settlement that gave ownership rights to Mr. Hendrix’s father also froze the Hendrix projects Mr. Douglas was still developing. After years of litigation, a 2012 court order allowed Mr. Douglas to complete a biographical book and documentary, both called “Starting From Zero,” based on the late guitarist’s original writings and statements.

Before he died, Mr. Douglas approved the documentary’s final edit and its producers hope to release it this year, said Stuart Shapiro, a Douglas friend and colleague who married Stella after her divorce from Mr. Douglas.

Mr. Shapiro said those close to Alan Douglas called him “A.D.,” a moniker first coined by Mr. Hendrix, who joked that it also meant “after death.”

“Now I’m living in the A.D. world,” said Mr. Shapiro, who Mr. Douglas tasked with completing and distributing “Zero,” his last Hendrix project. “The last thing Alan said to me was, “’Don’t compromise over your quest for quality.”’

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Postscript: Alan Douglas, Jazz Legend : The New Yorker

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** POSTSCRIPT: ALAN DOUGLAS
————————————————————
74270176-580.jpg

The mark of a great producer is to create the artistic equivalent of a family, in which, however clear the resemblances may be and however similar the shared practical experiences, they never get in the way of individual self-expression. With loving guidance, the producer helps to encourage individuality, to foster audacity, to coax the members of the family into situations where unexpectedly fruitful possibilities arise—and to provide the means for doing so. On Saturday, a great producer, Alan Douglas, died at the age of eighty-one. He is responsible for some of the greatest modern jazz recordings ever released (and perhaps for some that remain unreleased, too).

Douglas is best known for his work with Jimi Hendrix, and some of that work has proved controversial (although I think the pairing with the modern-jazz organist Larry Young (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7Hwt2aRYWo) is excellent). For me, his most interesting work with Hendrix is a recording that didn’t happen: a session with Miles Davis. There’s a terrific 1997 article by Edwin Pouncey from The Wire that’s posted on Douglas’s Web site (http://www.douglasrecords.com/bio.htm) , in which the producer speaks at length about this project, noting that he had fostered a two-year friendship between Hendrix and Davis, and that the recording session, which was on the verge of taking place, foundered over money (a half-hour before the session, Davis asked for fifty thousand dollars, and the drummer, Tony Williams, countered by asking for the same sum). But, intriguingly, Douglas adds, “ ‘Bitches Brew’ ”—the seminal work of Davis’s turn to electrically amplified band and rock-based
rhythms—“was the result of Miles hanging out with Jimi for two years.”

Douglas’s epochal insight regarding the merging of jazz and rock was rooted, from the start, in his profound understanding of jazz itself, with its own inherent clashes and fusions of styles. He was a modernist from the start, putting Cecil Taylor and John Coltrane together for “Hard Driving Jazz (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEtMgUZXthU) ,” in 1958, and recording some of the most electrifying live dates involving Charles Mingus (“Nostalgia in Times Square (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HafQ0B36ZIQ) ”), Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers (“Three Blind Mice (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fOM08TXG8E) ”), and Jackie McLean and Kenny Dorham (“Inta Somethin’ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1L5PzXoYumA)  ”). But his taste was matched by the discerning originality of his sound world. Douglas’s live recordings have a stark, harsh dryness that captures the intimate physicality of performance: the breath in the saxophone, the vibration of a reed, the drummer’s contact of wood
on skins and metal rims, the plucking of a string bass and the resonations of its body. Until reading about Douglas now, after his death, I had never realized that he was responsible for these recordings, but their family resemblance in the tone of their musical voice is distinctive; it’s one of the sounds of the era.

But Douglas’s absolute artistic coup, the crowning glory of his career, is a studio session that brings together three of the best of all jazz musicians—two longtime modernist allies, the bassist Charles Mingus and the drummer Max Roach, and their regal swing-era elder, Duke Ellington, playing piano. Douglas explained that, as a record-company employee in Paris in the nineteen-fifties, he had worked with Ellington’s band. When Douglas was placed in charge of the new jazz label at United Artists, in 1960, he recalled,

Duke said to me one day, “Why don’t you make a record with me?” I thought that he should make a piano record. I wasn’t so keen on the big band stuff, because he had done so many records like that. Six months later he called me at United Artists and I said, “Let’s do it with people who are from your mould, the next generation.”

The record that resulted, “Money Jungle,” is unlike any other that Ellington made, before or after. Here’s the title track (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mE4kPbMwXbA) . From the start, Mingus’s tone is aggressive, his rhythms provocative and fluctuating, as if to goad Ellington, who, for his part, responds with aggressive playing of his own. His left hand slams the keyboard in a persuasive emulation of Bud Powell or Thelonious Monk, and some of the figures (as at 2:55-3:10) have a chromatic wildness—and a percussive pugnacity—worthy of Taylor’s. Here, too, Douglas, by emphasizing the snap of Mingus’s bass and catching Ellington’s piano head on and close up, creates a soundscape that is as crucial to the record’s impact as the performances themselves.

As a teen-age aficionado of modern jazz, and especially the music of Eric Dolphy, I bought an odd-looking record on a knockoff label, on which Dolphy and some unnamed musicians played Fats Waller’s “Jitterbug Waltz” and an exotic, Latin-tinged, jinglingly comical tune called “Music Matador (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-f3ZKjVheE) .” The record featured soloists whose sound was unfamiliar to my ear but joyfully distinctive and decidedly avant-garde. It turns out that these recordings, too—as well as others by Dolphy from 1963 that feature many of the same musicians, on a record called “Iron Man”—are Douglas’s (I blew out a pair of speakers with Dolphy’s solo on thetitle track (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BHjs_9Xq9s) ). It’s some of Dolphy’s most advanced work (and, again, it’s recorded with a startling immediacy). But what Douglas says about the recording sessions sets me dreaming:

We spent an entire week in the studio with these guys playing non-stop from three o’clock in the afternoon to four o’clock the next morning. They just kept blowing. We weren’t even thinking about records, we were just thinking about music & getting Eric’s ideas out. There was stuff coming out of those sessions that nobody had ever heard before.

And, I wondered on Twitter this week, stuff that nobody has heard since? Do those tapes, with their likely dozens of hours of music—featuring Dolphy with such luminaries as Woody Shaw (in his first recordings, at the age of eighteen), Bobby Hutcherson, Richard Davis, Sonny Simmons, Prince Lasha, and Clifford Jordan—still exist? Finding and releasing them would be an extraordinary tribute to Douglas’s musical vision—and to his large and enduring artistic family.

Alan Douglas (right) with Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus during the recording of the album “Money Jungle.” Photograph by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty.

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Sex and pop: The forgotten 1909 hit that introduced adultery to American popular music.

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** Oh! You Kid!
————————————————————
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** How a sexed-up viral hit from the summer of ’09—1909—changed American pop music forever.
————————————————————
By Jody Rosen (http://www.slate.com/authors.jody_rosen.html)

1 =A FORGOTTEN HIT=

In the spring of 1909, American popular song got sexy. Of course, love and courtship, and by extension sex, had been Topic A in pop music for decades. But while songwriters had long trafficked in euphemisms and innuendo—coy talk of “sighing (https://i.imgur.com/R56wSEW.jpg) ” and “spooning (https://i.imgur.com/AkI5gm2.jpg) ” beneath the old oak tree (https://i.imgur.com/w5CGlxm.jpg) and by the light of the silvery moon (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIkU7V89t30) —it was a 1909 hit by composer Harry Von Tilzer and lyricist Jimmy Lucas, “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!,” which opened Tin Pan Alley to brasher, bawdier, more raucously comic songs of lust.

In 2014, “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” is forgotten by all but a few antiquarians. It deserves better. It’s a landmark, worthy of a place in the pantheon alongside “Give My Regards to Broadway (https://i.imgur.com/KqZfsZT.jpg) ” (1904) and “Alexander’s Ragtime Band (https://i.imgur.com/MF8bMry.jpg) ” (1911)—and, for that matter, “Like a Rolling Stone” and “Rapper’s Delight.” Like “The Twist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twist_(dance)#Twist_hits_on_Billboard) ” and “Call Me Maybe (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYWDySIzfFU) ,” it was a viral hit, inspiring hundreds of spinoffs and rippling through American culture for decades before dropping out of earshot. It was a succès de scandale, which brought roars from vaudeville audiences and censure from social reformers, with all sides agreeing that “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” had captured the zeitgeist, that it was a sign—the sound—of the times. It incited countless newspape
r editorials, fulminating sermons by preachers, and at least one fatal shooting.

Today, to the extent that we think at all about the turn-of-the-century hit parade, we regard it as prehistoric: quaint old music, redolent of ill-tuned pianos and gas-lit Rialtos, that was swept aside by grittier sounds, by the triumphal rise of jazz and rock ’n’ roll. If we listen closely to “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” we may hear a surprising lesson: that the culture-quaking shocks, the salaciousness and transgression we associate with blues and jazz and rock and hip-hop, first arrived in American pop many years earlier. There is more than a nostalgia trip in this 105-year-old opéra bouffe about an adulterous husband and wife.
2 =ADDING SEX TO A STOLEN SONG=
140529_CBOX_Cover-OhYouKidShapiro

The saga of “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” began like many on Tin Pan Alley: with theft. In 1908, the Shapiro Music Company published “Oh, You Kid!,” by the songwriters Edgar Selden and Melville J. Gideon. “Oh, You Kid!” was standard fare, a typical comic-courtship song: a catchy trifle, carrying a whiff of sex, but moderate in temperature and tempo.

Oh, you kid! Oh, you kid!
Come now, say you’ll let me cuddle closer
Nod your head but don’t you answer “No sir”
Oh, you kid! Oh, you kid!
I mean every word I’ve ever told you
Kiss me quick or else I’ll have to scold you
Oh, you kid!

The appeal of “Oh, You Kid!” lay mainly in that slangy endearment, “kid.” Like another novel usage of the period, “baby (https://i.imgur.com/ZtCVTmH.jpg) ,” “kid” held a hint of pillow-talk intimacy—a frisson that was enhanced by the threat to “scold” the kid who fails to deliver a quick kiss.

“Oh, You Kid!” was evidently a minor hit. (Just after the new year in 1909, the New York Star, a show business trade paper, reported (http://books.google.com/books?id=zDZPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA229&lpg=PA229&dq=%22oh+you+kid%22+%22edgar+selden%22+%22general+manager+for+M.+shapiro%22&source=bl&ots=9tnKI7zYbH&sig=5ELF5BRP1e8Kc-g10z9to9fOqnM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=p320Uuu5OPfJsQST3YFI&ved=0CCwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22edgar%20selden%22%20%22general%20manager%20for%20M.%20shapiro%22&f=false) that sales of the song’s sheet music had surpassed the 100,000 mark.) It certainly caught the attention of songwriters. In May 1909, Harry Armstrong and Billy Clark (https://i.imgur.com/zh8hU8K.jpg) , a vaudeville duo that also wrote songs, borrowed the “Oh, You Kid!” refrain for a new number, “I Love My Wife; But, Oh, You Kid! (https://i.imgur.com/lOEj0wa.jpg) ,” about a henpecked husband who lusts after a lady seated next to him in a restaurant. Armstrong & Clark’s song had a plodding tune and an awkward
lyric; it didn’t catch on. But it did its work, inspiring another song.

Copyright law had not yet caught up with the pop song business in 1909. Plagiarism was a thriving Tin Pan Alley institution; a pilfered song was, in the language of the trade, “a steal”—a fact of life in a cutthroat industry that thrived on trendiness and topicality, and held as an article of faith the belief that every hit could and should serve as a launching pad for dozens of light rewrites. The situation was exacerbated by the proximity of rival song publishing companies, which were clustered, in box-like offices, in the buildings that lined West 28th Street between Broadway and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan. In this cheek-by-jowl setting, new melodies could filter through walls and windows and be co-opted by competitors; songwriters threaded folded newspapers between piano strings to mute the instruments. The result was a tinkling, tinny piano sound, ringing out of the windows of song publishing firms, a din that earned the West 28th Street strip, and the song business at
large, the moniker Tin Pan Alley. The nickname was bestowed by journalist Monroe Rosenfeld, who, according to legend, coined the term while interviewing Harry Von Tilzer at the songwriter’s office in 1900.
140529_CBOX_Portrait-HarryVonTilzer

Courtesy of
Wikimedia Commons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HarryVonTilzer.jpg)

Von Tilzer muted his upright piano to protect against song thieves; he was a charter member of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers, the performance rights organization, founded in 1914, that brought a measure of law and order to the Wild West of pop music intellectual property. But that didn’t stop Von Tilzer from swiping a good idea when he heard one.On May 12, 1909, just nine days after Armstrong & Clark published “I Love My Wife; But, Oh, You Kid!,” Von Tilzer and Jimmy Lucas released their own variation. It was a heist and an upgrade, improving on the Armstrong & Clark original with a more winning melody, with sharper and racier lyrics, and with not one but three “I Loves” in the title.
140529_CBOX_Cover-LoveLoveLove

Now Jonesy was a married man—oh yes, he was
Sweet girlie on the single plan—I guess she was
Jonesy stopped and spoke to girlie
Just as old friends often do
And he said, “I’m married but”
“That ‘but,’ my dear, means you”

I love, I love, I love my wife—but oh, you kid!
For my dear wife I’d give my life—but oh, you kid!
Now wifey dear is good to me, a wrong she never did
I love, I love, I love my wife—but oh, you kid!

The success of Von Tilzer and Lucas’ “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” was in part a matter of the superior song craft. The lyric is cheeky; turn-of-the-century slang dictionaries suggest that I may not be wrong in detecting a saucy pun (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=butt) on the word “but” in the last line of the first verse. (“I’m married but/That‘but,’ my dear, means you.”) Von Tilzer’s fluency with hooks is on display, especially in the chorus, with its wide melodic leaps and that taunting singsong refrain, “Oh, you kid!”

What really set the song apart in 1909, though, was its tone: the relish with which extramarital shenanigans were depicted. For decades, popular songs about adultery had been Victorian morality plays—dolorous parlor ballads in 3/4 time, which promised that loneliness (https://i.imgur.com/N4dB1BZ.jpg) and ostracism (https://i.imgur.com/WT0imeM.jpg) awaited those who dared defile the marital bedchamber. Even comic songs had a strain of moralism: In Armstrong & Clark’s “I Love My Wife; But, Oh, You Kid!,” the husband with the wandering eye gets his comeuppance when, in the second verse, his wife turns up in the restaurant to drag him out the door. But in Von Tilzer and Lucas’ song, the flirting in verse one is apparently successful—and when the wife materializes in the second verse, she’s busy having her own fun, with a butcher:

Now Jonesy’s wife and butcher man each morn would chat
This butcher too was married but she didn’t mind that
And when poor Jonesy left the house each morning
They would sit and spoon
“Tell your tootsie who you love”
Then softly he would croon:
“I love, I love, I love my wife—but oh, you kid!”

What we have here, in other words, is a Progressive Era “O.P.P. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xGuGSDsDrM) ”—a song that insists, as Irving Berlin put it a few years later in spiritually kindred number, “everybody’s doin’ it now (https://i.imgur.com/KFccuRp.jpg) .” How exactly Von Tilzer and Lucas’ song became a hit is uncertain. In 1909, the recording industry was still in its infancy, the popular music economy was fueled by sheet music sales, and hit songs were usually made in live performance, on the vaudeville circuit. The surest way for Tin Pan Alley song pluggers to turn a new number into a hit was to place it in the act of a prominent variety stage performer, a task usually accomplished by pressure or payola—by arm-twisting, horse-trading, and often enough, straight pay-for-play bribery. If all went well, the song would be added by a well-known singer and “go over” onstage; additional performers would make room for the number in their repertoires, and vaudeville
touring troupes would take the tune from New York out across the country. Dance bands, restaurant orchestras, singing waiters, and street-corner buskers would likewise pick up the song; player-piano rolls would be recorded, and occasionally, singers would cut a wax cylinder or 78 RPM record. Eventually, a hit song would make the leap that music publishers really cared about, from the public to the private sphere: from the vaudeville proscenium to the sheet music stands of a million parlor room pianos.
3 =FROM THE STICKS TO THE WHITE HOUSE=
140529_CBOX_Comic-DesMoines

Graphic by Slate

The performance provenance of “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” is unclear: I’ve found no evidence indicating when the song was introduced, or by whom. We can assume, though, that it was scooped up by several singers. Harry Von Tilzer was a reliable hitmaker; when a new Von Tilzer number was published, vaudevillians snapped to attention. In any event, the historical record is unambiguous about the song’s swift migration from New York to, as Von Tilzer and his Runyonesque Tin Pan Alley colleagues would have put it, the sticks. Less than a month after its publication, “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” had traveled as far west as Iowa: On June 10, the Des Moines News ran a front-page above-the-fold editorial cartoon about congressional spending (http://i.imgur.com/MQpSzvE.jpg) that punned on the song’s title.

By the time spring turned to summer, “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” was inescapable. “In 1909, most of us gentlemen…were parroting ‘I love my wife, but oh, you kid!”’ wrote the Algonquin Round Table wit Franklin P. Adams in a 1938 New Yorker reminiscence. Gentlemen weren’t the only ones who succumbed. The song cut a wildfire path across popular culture. What survives today of the craze that one wag called “the ‘Oh, You Kid’ madness” is a cabinet packed with curiosities: one-reel motion pictures (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1315958/) , studio photographs (http://i.imgur.com/Jjx54if.jpg) , neckties (http://i.imgur.com/vWdXHsd.jpg) , pinback buttons (http://i.imgur.com/9kd9N0V.jpg) , lapel pins (http://i.imgur.com/obBy4zY.jpg) , porcelain figurines (http://i.imgur.com/9YArvdK.jpg) ,souvenir dishware (http://i.imgur.com/6g1dDCb.jpg) , and hundreds of picture postcards, which savored (https://i.imgur.com/SstUqwI.jpg) the song’s naughtiness
(https://i.imgur.com/ugxEVgp.jpg) and found (https://i.imgur.com/BABa9HC.jpg) fodder (https://i.imgur.com/xTgAXIM.jpg) for lame jokes (https://i.imgur.com/w4BqjE8.jpg) , silly wordplay (https://i.imgur.com/lz1IBhV.jpg) , and racial (https://i.imgur.com/xgxUcD2.jpg) and ethnic (https://i.imgur.com/IIGUDaH.jpg) caricatures.
140529_CBOX_Postcard

Like other pop culture catchphrases, from “Elementary, my dear Watson” to “Whoomp! There It Is,” the song’s slogan quickly became ubiquitous, seducing millions and annoying nearly as many. It was used in advertisements for everything from Broadway musicals (http://i.imgur.com/3FyC4Rg.jpg) to pretzels (https://i.imgur.com/Kt3UiPe.jpg) . It was translated by newspapers into Esperanto (https://i.imgur.com/UzGPXQP.jpg) (“Ho! Vi kaprido!”). It was bellowed by a lovelorn Philadelphian (http://i.imgur.com/H2i5T6E.jpg) as he leaped from a bridge into the Schuylkill River, attempting suicide. It brought scandal (https://i.imgur.com/9PoviI9.jpg) to a church in Geneva, Ill., when a prankster altered the hymnal, adding the line “but, oh, you kid!” to the lyrics of the devotional “I Love My God.” It wasgraffitied on a newlywed couple’s honeymoon cabin (https://i.imgur.com/m5Qxpac.jpg) , next to another bawdy phrase, “Cum Rite Inn.”

A dispatch from New York published in the July 19, 1909, edition of the Walla Walla, Wash., Evening Statesman bemoaned the “damfoolishness” of the “Oh! You Kid!” phenomenon:

If anything was lacking—but there it 
isn’t—to prove that New York is the
 biggest yap town in the universe, and
 entitled to the appellation of the rube
 city, it could be found in the acceptance of such slang phrases as “Oh, you kid.” Meaningless jargon that it 
is, utterly bereft of any glimmer of
 common sense that would appeal to 
the intelligence lurking in the noodle of a new-born doodle-bug, the phrase has been taken up and perpetuated by millions of the human insects that have their burrows in the metropolis. On the streets one is greeted by
 hawkers offering for sale buttons bearing the idiotic refrain—buttons from 
which dangle rude caricatures of nude 
infants—and which are thrust into the
 faces of men and women alike with 
insulting repetitions of the 
phrase. Phonographs repeat the idiotic exclamation, and vaudeville performers inject it forcibly into their already wearisome dialogue.

The reach of “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” extended to the White House. At the Gridiron Club Dinner, the annual gala gathering of Washington elites attended in December 1909 by President William Howard Taft, the president was saluted in song (http://books.google.com/books?id=bOIrAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA16&lpg=PA16&dq=%22but+oh+you%22&source=bl&ots=gX3kRp1mAL&sig=FZQ0K72dps4VLAurmcqApVOLOys&hl=en&sa=X&ei=tLwBUOP9HIjL6wHHqYHxBg&ved=0CGMQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=%22but%20oh%20you%22&f=false) : “We love, we love, we love Roosevelt—but oh, you Taft!” By the time the new year rolled around, “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” fatigue itself had become a cliché. (“Perhaps the worst thing 1909 has to answer for is the ‘Oh You, Kid!’ idiocy,” sighed the editorial page of the Arizona Silver Belt.) The Denver Post simply gave in, greeting 1910 with the inevitable “We loved 
the old year, but Oh, You Kid!”

The epicenter of “oh, you kid!”-mania was Tin Pan Alley. Songwriters scrambled to capitalize on the big hit, pumping out parodies and rewrites: “I Love My Wife—But Oh! Her Family,” “I Love My Pipe—But Oh You Pippin! (https://i.imgur.com/xiCfr2m.jpg) ,” “I Love My Horse and Wagon—But Oh You Buick Car!,” and copious winking (https://i.imgur.com/CHrEq8X.jpg) -and (https://i.imgur.com/4VGUWF3.jpg) -nudging (https://i.imgur.com/jgLHwy3.jpg) variations (https://i.imgur.com/jZJ2P4y.jpg) on (https://i.imgur.com/74T7Pzy.jpg) the (https://i.imgur.com/8ijLO4l.jpg) “kid (https://i.imgur.com/yKve5DM.jpg) ” theme (https://i.imgur.com/C8ypYBb.jpg) —tales (https://i.imgur.com/fLltEq0.jpg) of street corner pickups (https://i.imgur.com/YopNC8i.jpg) and illicit rendezvous (https://i.imgur.com/eGoVm8p.jpg) .
140529_CBOX_Cover-Derivatives

Graphic by Slate

Meanwhile, song after song played adultery for laughs, with the body count of cuckolded husbands and abandoned wives piling high: “I Won’t Be Home ‘Till Late, Dear (https://i.imgur.com/HJ68aQx.jpg) ,” “She Borrowed My Only Husband (And Forgot to Bring Him Back) (https://i.imgur.com/kcgkzIk.jpg) ,” “If You Talk in Your Sleep, Don’t Mention My Name (https://i.imgur.com/REwlEbw.jpg) ,” “Oh! Where Is My Wife To-Night,” “I Trust My Husband Anywhere But I Like to Stick Around (http://i.imgur.com/YjhjVPH.jpg) ,” “I Can Dance With Everybody but My Wife,” (https://i.imgur.com/5MJWzFC.jpg) “Don’t Leave Your Wife Alone,” “I’m Just as Good as Single (I’ve Sent My Wife Away),” “You for Me When Your Wife’s Away (http://i.imgur.com/U7s88ac.jpg) ,” “I’m Glad My Wife’s in Europe (http://i.imgur.com/GJ2AVYo.jpg) ,” “Everything’s at Home Except Your Wife (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVuvp7Rc7Sw) .”
140529_CBOX_Cover-Wife

Graphic by Slate
140529_CBOX_Cover-Hurrah

The most successful copycat song, “My Wife’s Gone to the Country! Hurrah! Hurrah!,” was the first hit by 21-year-old Irving Berlin. Berlin’s song was a pop (https://i.imgur.com/qRMQBkB.jpg) culture (https://i.imgur.com/guOwBbp.jpg) sensation (https://i.imgur.com/tcIRXCC.jpg) in (https://i.imgur.com/ThJK5gc.jpg) its (https://i.imgur.com/bKpwkXD.jpg) own (https://i.imgur.com/3lhdMcG.jpg) right (https://i.imgur.com/8ePEre1.jpg) , but its chorus made no secret of the debt to “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!”

My wife’s gone to the country, hurray! hurray!

She thought it best
“I need the rest”
That’s why she went away

She took the children with her, hurray! hurray!

I love my wife, but oh, you kid!
My wife’s gone away

These spinoffs date from the months immediately following the publication of “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” But the original had a long cultural shelf life. In The American Language (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0394400755/?tag=slatmaga-20) (1921), H.L. Mencken complained about the banality of the phrase “I love my wife, but oh you kid!,” which he nonetheless included in a list of “current phrases and proverbs … that display the national talent for extravagant and pungent humor.” “I love my wife, but oh you kid!” was a favorite quip of Groucho Marx, who used it for years in comedy routines, and as a tagline when he signed autographs (http://i.imgur.com/U16SRyD.jpg) . The phrase pops up in John Dos Passos’ The 42nd Parallel (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00H12ACKI/?tag=slatmaga-20) (1930), in William Faulkner’s The Town (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004JHYSIA/?tag=slatmaga-20) (1957), in Joseph Heller’sSomething Happened
(http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005IQZ894/?tag=slatmaga-20) (1974). Delmore Schwartz, in his 1948 novella The World Is a Wedding, puts the words “I love my wife, but oh you id,” in the mouth of a character who, Schwartz writes, “had studied Freud and Tin Pan Alley.”

For decades, musical revivalists (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5qJYbOt-NQ) returned (http://i.imgur.com/ae2BEHe.jpg) to (http://i.imgur.com/ca3g86k.jpg) Von Tilzer and Lucas’ hit for nostalgic titillation—for a dose of raunchiness in period dress. The 1946 MGM movie musical The Harvey Girls (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00713872W/?tag=slatmaga-20) , a turn-of-the-century period piece starring Judy Garland, featured a new Harry Warren–Johnny Mercer song, “Oh, You Kid,” performed by Angela Lansbury as a high-kicking burlesque number. “Oh you kid, does wifey keep you hid?/I don’t know if she does, but she’d be wiser if she did,” Lansbury sang.

To filmgoers in 1946, the turn-of-the-century bawdiness revisited in “Oh, You Kid!” must have seemed quaint. In 1909, Von Tilzer and Lucas’ song was anything but. “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” played sexual brazenness for laughs, but to many it was an affront—a fire-in-a-crowded-theater provocation that crossed the boundary of decency. The song was a culture war flashpoint, the subject of legal imbroglios, and, sometimes, an inciter of violence. A Missouri farmer who sent a young woman a postcard (https://i.imgur.com/zt4f8iJ.jpg) bearing the legend “I Love My Wife, But Oh You Kid!” was hauled into United States District
 Court in Jefferson City, threatened with five years imprisonment, and given a stiff fine for the crime of “sending improper matter through the mails.” In Los Angeles, a “petite and pretty” woman, Marie Durfee, assaulted a man after he greeted her on the street with the song’s catchphrase. A police court judge sided with Durfee,ruling:
(http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=LAH19100907.2.77.10) “The salutation, ‘Oh, you kid!’ is a
 disturbance of the peace and is punishable by ninety days’ imprisonment in
 the city jail.”
140529_CBOX_Clipping-Insult

Graphic by Slate

Other jurists were more severe. The Oct. 28, 1909, edition of the New York Timesnoted a bizarre ruling by a court in Pittsburgh: “Any man who shouts ‘Oh, you kid!’ at a woman on the street, even though she should be his own wife, should be whipped. The Magistrate said he would not fine any man who administered the whipping.” An editorial writer in Arizona went further (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87082863/1909-10-22/ed-1/seq-2/#date1=1836&sort=date&rows=20&words=kid+oh+you&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=0&state=&date2=1922&proxtext=but+oh+you+kid%22&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=14) : “The man who without cause or reason, says ‘I 
love my wife, but oh you kid!’ would not wear
 his button long, for the fool killer would start 
for him and mercifully end his existence.” That scenario was not, it turned out, farfetched. In October 1910, in Atlanta, a man named N.H. Bassett was shot by George Lambert, a railway company executive, after Bassett approached
Lambert’s wife on the street crying, “Oh, you kid!” “It is believed Bassett will die,” wire services blithely reported (http://i.imgur.com/7dxrUOg.jpg) . “Lambert surrendered, but was at
 once released.”

The furor over “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!,” like the song itself, was definitively a thing of its time. Behind the sidewalk confrontations and draconian legal rulings we can perceive the anxieties of that post-Victorian moment: concerns about coarsening manners, about changing courtship rites, about the threat posed by modernity to the 19th-century ideal of “pure womanhood.” Traditionalists’ fears were heightened by the women’s suffrage movement, which held the promise of political enfranchisement and further freedoms, including sexual ones. That prospect was celebrated by popular songwriters, who indulged their taste for egalitarian erotic adventure in romps like “I Love My Husband, But—Oh, You Henry! (https://i.imgur.com/ZWRr4NR.jpg) ” and “I Love My Steady, But I’m Crazy for My Once in a While (https://i.imgur.com/vkZA5ak.jpg) .”
140529_CBOX_Cover-Suffragettes

Graphic by Slate

Blame for the erosion of traditional values was often placed on mass culture, in particular on popular music. The criticism had a racialist-tinge: Pop’s polyglot sound was scorned as a social contagion, a toxic blend of black ragtime’s “jungle rhythms” and the “low-class melodies” churned out by Tin Pan Alley’s “Hebrew song mills.” But the fears always circled back to women and sex. An article in the April 1910 issue of the American Magazine decried “The Decay of Vaudeville (http://books.google.com/books?id=3nAWAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA846&dq=%22suggestive+songs%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=1zq4UP2aHMXs0gGkj4GIAg&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22suggestive%20songs%22&f=false) ”:

The only limit is what the police will allow, and the police apparently draw the line only at indecent physical exhibitions, and not always there. The far more pernicious evil of suggestive songs and lewd, lascivious jests goes quite unheeded by the authorities. It is a fact that if your wife or your daughter goes to a vaudeville theatre at the present time the chances are at least seventy-five in a hundred that she will hear some jest or some song that reeks of the barroom or worse.

One “suggestive song” in particular drew the ire of pundits, social reformers, and clergy. Wilbur F. Crafts (http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/File:Rev._Wilbur_F._Crafts.jpg) , a Methodist minister and the head of the Washington, D.C.–based National Reform Bureau, decried “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” in newspaper interviews. “Use of the expression ‘I love my wife, but, oh you 
kid,’ greatly injures people’s morals,” Crafts said. “People laugh when I say that, but 
it’s true just the same.” A 1909 essay in the magazine Physical Culture echoed the sentiment:

One of the most amazing exemplifications of the morals of mankind, and womankind also, has been indicated in the popularity of a sort of ribald song which very clearly portrays an unfaithful husband. The most popular phrase in this song is “I love my wife, but oh you kid.” Wherever this song is sung it is hilariously applauded. The singer is always careful to so modulate his voice as to make his meaning very clear. … National life depends on moral life. Loose morals, debased principles, degeneracy, they mean a gradual destruction of mankind. … “I love my wife, but oh you kid.” Is there anything amusing in the thought conveyed?

Billy Sunday. Billy Sunday.

Courtesy of Library of Congress (http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3b05466/)

The song’s most prominent opponent was Billy Sunday (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Sunday) , the evangelical preacher who commanded an audience of millions in the first decades of the century. In a 1911 sermon, Sunday rained fire and brimstone on pop music: “In times past, popular plays and their songs used to glorify the marriage relation. Now we hear such songs in the theater as ‘My Wife Has Gone to the Country, Hurray! Hurray!’ and ‘I Love My Wife, But Oh You Kid!’ These are things of the devil, things driving audiences to sin and hell.” Tin Pan Alley, of course, had an answer for the evangelist: “I Love My Billy Sunday, But Oh You Saturday Night (https://i.imgur.com/Crh69yr.jpg) .”

Sunday wasn’t exactly wrong, though. Deglorifying “the marriage relation” wasn’t just fun sport and big business on Tin Pan Alley. It was cutting edge. “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” and the cheating anthems that followed it marked an aesthetic shift. In the past, songwriters had channeled ribaldry into minstrelsy, displacing sexual misbehavior onto ethnic characters, especially blacks, as in Harry Von Tilzer’s 1899 coon song (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coon_song) hit, “I’d Leave Ma Happy Home for You (https://i.imgur.com/MSxVAKV.jpg) .” Songs like “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” took a different tack: They embraced mild ragtime syncopation but were performed by vaudevillians without dialect, in the voices of “normal” bourgeois white Protestant Americans. These songs were doubly modern, bringing new forthrightness about sex—it was a thing, it seemed, that even respectable white people did, for fun—while gentrifying and deracinating r
agtime: recasting the expressive vocals and jaunty rhythms, previously reserved for blackface songs, as vernacular Yankee Doodle American pop. Consider “My Husband’s in the City,” an answer to Berlin’s “My Wife’s Gone to the Country,” as drawled in a 1910 recording by Sophie Tucker.
140529_CBOX_Cover-HusbandCity

When summer comes we go away
To mountains or seashore
I can’t take hubby with me, poor boy
He must mind the store
You bet he’s having one good time
Although he writes he’s blue
But he ain’t got a thing on me
I have a good time, too

Oh! My husband’s in the city
’Bout a hundred miles away
He thinks for him I’m pining
“Fading away”
So he comes out every Friday
For what, I do not know
But he only stays ’till Sunday
Hurray! Hurrah! Hurrow!

Songs like “My Husband’s in the City” are a reminder that popular music in this period aimed for the funny bone with an intensity that it hadn’t before, and hasn’t since. The jokes were in part a response to the sentimentality of 19th-century pop, which was dominated by florid love ballads and tear-jerkers. Curiously, one of the star practitioners of the old style was Harry Von Tilzer. In the decade prior to the publication of “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!,” Von Tilzer had established himself as the Alley’s marquee songwriter-mogul by specializing in schlock.
4 =THE CONSUMMATE TIN PAN ALLEY WORKHORSE=

Harry Von Tilzer (https://i.imgur.com/EMi3UY8.jpg) is one of the more remarkable figures in the history of American song. He was born Aaron Gumbinsky, in 1872, in Detroit, to German-Jewish immigrant parents. When he was 14, he ran away from home to join the Cole Bros. Circus, where he worked as a singer and an acrobat. A year later, he relocated to Chicago, where he took a job playing piano and singing in a variety theater troupe. He began dabbling in songwriting, published his first number in 1892, and relocated to New York to pursue the career. (He was followed to Tin Pan Alley by his younger brother, Albert, who eventually earned fame as the composer of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game (https://i.imgur.com/kU7uPzn.jpg) .”) Aaron had earlier changed his name to Harry Gumm, but in New York he changed it again, adding an aristocratic “Von” to his mother’s maiden name. His breakthrough came in 1898 with “My Old New Hampshire Home (https://i.imgur.com/jzCRVI8.jpg) ,” a
sentimental ballad lifted out of the goop by Von Tilzer’s stirring tune (http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9683/) . The song’s sheet music sold 2 million copies—the first in a long string of multimillion-selling hits.
140529_CBOX_Portrait-HarryVonTilzerHandbill

Von Tilzer’s biography, in other words, traces a familiar path: From child of the Jewish ghetto to bootstrapping showbiz tyro to autodidact all-American hit-maker. It’s the heroic trajectory we associate with Irving Berlin, and although Berlin always claimed Stephen Foster as his muse, Von Tilzer was his real model—right down to the fancy adopted “German” surname. Berlin’s first paying Tin Pan Alley gig, when he was still Izzy Baline, was as a guerrilla song plugger, or “boomer,” for the Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co. (It was his job to stir up enthusiasm for newly published Von Tilzer numbers by shouting for encores from the vaudeville cheap seats.) Not only was Berlin’s debut hit an “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” rewrite, the song that made Berlin’s career, the 1911 smash “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” was a sequel to Von Tilzer’s hit coon song, “Alexander, Don’t You Love Your Baby No More (https://i.imgur.com/IglzsbH.jpg) ” (1904), and
Berlin’s great 1924 torch ballad “All Alone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81XSxM4no-w) ” (“All alone/By the telephone/Waiting for a ring …”) was transparently based on Von Tilzer’s 1911 “telephone song” of the same title (https://i.imgur.com/z3WaiAv.jpg) .

It was Von Tilzer’s approach to songwriting, his productivity and populism, which really blazed the trail for Berlin. Von Tilzer was the consummate Tin Pan Alley workhorse. He cranked out thousands of songs, trying his hand at every imaginable genre and sub-genre, while heeding the slightest shifts in the variable winds of public taste. He composed love songs (https://i.imgur.com/gMPWGO8.jpg) and rags (https://i.imgur.com/7AzlYLb.jpg) and patriotic tunes (https://i.imgur.com/l7QghCI.jpg) ; he had hits with blackface numbers (https://i.imgur.com/U4BfFNJ.jpg) and German dialect songs (https://i.imgur.com/PWeZX8q.jpg) . He put out topical songs about Ouija boards (https://i.imgur.com/U7emjjl.jpg) , Liberty Bonds (https://i.imgur.com/E10nwfD.jpg) , prohibition (https://i.imgur.com/YnOIyGP.jpg) , and the discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb (https://i.imgur.com/sFBZXpw.jpg) . He spurred dance crazes with “The Cubanola Glide (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcHK6bdmhdc) ” (1910) and
“The Bunny Hug (https://i.imgur.com/GnjD6Wo.jpg) ” (1912). His 1905 ballad “Wait ’Till the Sun Shines, Nellie (https://i.imgur.com/JJJHAJP.jpg) ” is still the unofficial theme song of the New York Stock Exchange (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY-uUfKcJI0) .

Top Comment

I love my content-free Slate clickbait, but oh, you Jody Rosen!

-Draugr

57 Comments (http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2014/06/sex_and_pop_the_forgotten_1909_hit_that_introduced_adultery_to_american.html#comments) Join In (http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2014/06/sex_and_pop_the_forgotten_1909_hit_that_introduced_adultery_to_american.html#comments)

Von Tilzer wrote lyrics as well as music, although he rarely took credit for them. In fact, in a 1943 lawsuit, Von Tilzer claimed that he, not Jimmy Lucas, had written the words to “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!”: that he’d agreed to give away the lyric-writing credit because Lucas had suggested the title of the song and had promised to plug it. (This kind of transactional gifting of songwriting credits was a common practice on Tin Pan Alley.) Whether or not we take Von Tilzer at his word and regard “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” as his song, music and lyrics, it is an exemplary Harry Von Tilzer song—because of its catchiness and appeal, certainly, and because of its uncanny good timing, its arrival at just the right moment to satisfy a public eager for more piquantly spiced hits. That skill for zeroing in on the next big thing carried over to Von Tilzer’s role as a publishing tycoon and talent scout. A decade after giving Irving Berlin
his start, Von Tilzer published the first song by 17-year-old George Gershwin, an inauspicious novelty piece called “When You Want ’Em, You Can’t Get ’Em, When You’ve Got ’Em, You Don’t Want ’Em (http://i.imgur.com/6FhQUFH.jpg) ” (1916).

Von Tilzer was most famous for the ballads he composed in the 1890s and first years of the new century. The songwriter himself was unsentimental and ironic, but he had a knack for the kind of music, lavishly drizzled with schmaltz, that was feasted on by late-Victorian audiences: extravagant chromaticism bolstering lyrics about roses in bloom and sweethearts in the gloaming and old folks at home, and morbidly moralistic stories of dead babies, sainted mothers, and ruined womanhood. The biggest blockbuster of Von Tilzer’s career was the tremulous “A Bird in a Gilded Cage” (1900), which wagged a finger at a pretty girl stuck in a marriage to an old coot.
140529_CBOX_Cover-GildedCage

She’s only a bird in a gilded cage
A beautiful sight to see
You may think she’s happy and free from care
She’s not, though she seems to be
’Tis sad when you think of her wasted life
For youth cannot mate with age
And her beauty was sold
For an old man’s gold
She’s a bird in a gilded cage

If the sobs in this definitive turn-of-the-century “sob ballad (http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9683/) ” sound like they’re laid on extra-thick—they are. “A Bird in a Gilded Cage” began its life as a parody: Von Tilzer composed the music on a dare, when the lyricist Arthur Lamb challenged him to come up with a melody that would befit his preposterously soppy verses. The musicologist Jon W. Finson has written of “A Bird in a Gilded Cage”: “The whole song has an ironic quality to its melodrama, as if the author’s manipulation of sentiment were meant to be obvious. Von Tilzer overdoes the chromatic interludes between phrases, making a caricature of the period cliché in which imported cadences supported harmonies by descending a half step.”

The mischievousness of this stunt says a lot about Von Tilzer, and it sheds light on “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!,” which was often performed as a parody of Victorian ballad style. Listen to the hammy rendition of the song’s chorus recorded in 1909 by vocalist Arthur Collins. Collins lampoons parlor ballad waltzes, lustily rolling his R’s, quavering histrionically, and rising to a mock-operatic crescendos.

Vocal burlesques of this sort were common in the songs of the period, particularly in the adultery-themed songs that followed “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” A textbook case is another Von Tilzer number, “I Sent My Wife to the Thousand Isles” (1916), sung by Al Jolson in a rollicking travesty of light opera vocal style.
140529_CBOX_Cover-ThousandIsles

Just think when I get home tonight
There’ll be no wifey there
And right across the table
I will see a vacant chair
I love my wife, I love my wife
I love her more each day
I love my wife, I love my wife
Because she’s far away

What we are hearing in these send-ups is not just a joke about genres. It’s the sound of a generation gap opening: the brusque changing of the musical guard that takes place every couple of decades, when the young toss their parents’ soundtracks on the dung heap. In the ’50s and ’60s, Frank Sinatra and Patti Page were elbowed aside in favor of R&B and rock ’n’ roll. In the ’80s and ’90s, the children of baby boomers ditched rock for hip-hop. Thus “Let’s Make a Rag of the Old Oaken Bucket (https://i.imgur.com/HfYqFbj.jpg) ” (1911), which remade the 19th-century parlor room standard “The Old Oaken Bucket (https://i.imgur.com/pWBMrRB.jpg) ,” a maudlin ballad (http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/8546/) of childhood and old homestead nostalgia (http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Old_Oaken_Bucket.htm) , as sex-soaked 20th-century ragtime: “Let’s make a rag of the old oaken bucket/Syncopate that melody/Let’s hug and squeeze while the keys nip and tuck
it.” The next rhyme wasn’t, as in the dirty old limerick (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There_once_was_a_man_from_Nantucket#Ribald_versions) , “Nantucket”—but it may as well have been.
5 =AN ANTHEM OF FREEDOM AND YOUTH=

The standard historical narrative treats the 1950s as the dawn of popular music as we know it: the moment when the sex simmering beneath the surface bubbled to the top, when teenagers stampeded to dance floors, when rock ’n’ roll cracked open a gulf between the generations, never again to be bridged. But ’50s sock-hoppers were merely restaging scenes that had played out decades before. At the turn of the century, dance halls teemed with hormonal youth. From Dance Hall to White Slavery: The World’s Greatest Tragedy (http://books.google.com/books?id=EP6NH1jihcUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=from+dance+hall+to+white+slavery&hl=en&sa=X&ei=EanBUt_SNZXesATbjIGwDQ&ved=0CDQQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=from%20dance%20hall%20to%20white%20slavery&f=false) (1912), a tract about the evils of social dancing, noted with alarm that “an evening’s average of 86,000 young people attend the dance halls of Chicago,” where they “danced to the suggestive music of the cheap orchestras”—to Tin Pan Alley’s endless
supply of “new and more suggestive” songs.

Ragtime’s slaves-to-the-rhythm (https://i.imgur.com/bOAnvIv.jpg) weren’t just figments of Billy Sunday’s fevered imagination—and “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” wasn’t just a novelty ditty. It was, like the other hits of its era, a generational marker, an anthem of changing times and freedom and youth. The old songs sound goofy to us, but a hundred years ago they carried a teenybopper throb and the impish menace of punk rock.

Rifling the “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” scrapbook, we catch some intriguing glimpses of that young audience. The song was big on campus: The phrase “oh, you kid!” was banned at Yale (https://i.imgur.com/H17CBnG.jpg) , and Princeton University was scandalized when it awoke one morning in December 1909 to find those words slapped in bright red paint on the walls of the theological seminary’s chapel (https://i.imgur.com/wLevXzO.jpg/) .

My favorite “I Love, I Love, I Love My Wife—But Oh! You Kid!” artifact—the most alluring and mysterious one I’ve run across—is a photograph that I bought several years ago on eBay. Dated 1909, the snapshot captures four young people, apparently in their late teens or early 20s, sitting arm in arm on what looks like the lawn of a large house. They are pointing the soles of their eight shoes towards the camera, with a letter painted on each to spell out—what else?—OH YOU KID.
140529_CBOX_Photo-ShoesWide

Am I the only one who finds this image eerily familiar? Am I wrong to imagine that we are looking at a turn-of-the-century version of the mods, the Deadheads, the breakdance crew? Who could doubt that it was these four, or their spiritual cousins, who defaced the seminary chapel at Princeton? And who can deny the rock-star charisma of the young woman second from the left, with her scarf knotted like a necktie, and a glower worthy of Chrissie Hynde? Her gaze, implacable and sphinxlike, feels like a taunt—a reminder of how little we know, how much we’ve forgotten, about our musical past. But there’s at least one clear message in that hard, cool stare: In 1909, as in 1966, as in 2013, the kids were alright. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afam2nIae4o)
Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

** ↂ
————————————————————
This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
————————————————————

**
————————————————————
DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
————————————————————
The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=ccc6a1bf07) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=ccc6a1bf07&e=[UNIQID])

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269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

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‘Never-before-seen’ 1972 Miles Davis acetate from Columbia Recording Studios available on eBay | Dangerous Minds

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‘NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN’ 1972 MILES DAVIS ACETATE FROM COLUMBIA RECORDING STUDIOS AVAILABLE ON EBAY

06.11.2014
06:34 am

Topics:
Music (http://dangerousminds.net/categories/category/music)

Tags:
Miles Davis (http://dangerousminds.net/tag/Miles-Davis)

Miles Davis

A strange and marvelous item popped up on eBay recently—as of Wednesday, June 11, the auction in question (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Miles-Davis-Never-Before-Seen-Columbia-12-Acetate-from-1972-HEAR-IT-/201104058840) , posted by reputable eBay user carolinasoul, has four days and change to go. As of this writing, the price is at $315, for which you will receive “one jaw-droppingly special piece, a likely one-of-a-kind Miles Davis acetate.” According to the handwritten label, the material was recorded on December 28, 1972.

The two sides—you can’t even say “side A” and “side B” in a situation like this—are 14:40 and 5:40 in length. According to carolinasoul, “We’ve identified the 14:40 side as a take of the track that would eventually become ‘Billy Preston (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=as_li_qf_sp_sr_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=aps&keywords=Billy%20Preston%20miles%20davis&linkCode=as2&tag=boxoffbof-20) ’ on Get Up With It (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004VWA5/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00004VWA5&linkCode=as2&tag=boxoffbof-20) .” Davis’ 1974 album (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004VWA5/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00004VWA5&linkCode=as2&tag=boxoffbof-20) was the trumpeter’s last studio album before his “retirement” in the mid-1970s.

The material on the 5:40 side has yet to be identified.

Miles Davis

Here are the snippets of material carolinasoul posted as a sample:

Excerpt #1 of the 14:40 side:

Excerpt #2 of the 14:40 side:

Excerpt #3 of the 14:40 side:

Excerpt #4 of the 14:40 side:

Excerpt #1 of the 5:40 side:

Excerpt #2 of the 5:40 side:

Miles Davis

This is one of those auctions where it’s hard to believe that “No questions or answers have been posted about this item.”

Miles Davis, “Billy Preston”:

Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

** ↂ
————————————————————
This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
————————————————————

**
————————————————————
DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
————————————————————
The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=c8b89ec240) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=c8b89ec240&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

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Teaneck jazz photographer Chuck Stewart, 87, honored by township – News – NorthJersey.com

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http://www.northjersey.com/news/his-life-s-work-is-a-melody-of-images-1.1031318

** Teaneck jazz photographer Chuck Stewart, 87, honored by township
————————————————————

Chuck Stewart, 87, an award-winning photographer, was recently named one of Teaneck most outstanding residents.

VIOREL FLORESCU/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Chuck Stewart, 87, an award-winning photographer, was recently named one of Teaneck most outstanding residents.

TEANECK — Chuck Stewart didn’t move to this township half a century ago just because he’d heard good things about it.

Stewart, a renowned photographer of thousands of jazz album covers and editorial spreads for such icons as Miles Davis and Billie Holiday, had been tracking down a music industry associate, who moved from New York City to Teaneck without telling him. That business associate, famed R&B disc jockey Jack “The Pear Shaped Talker” Walker, owed him some records.

Stewart found Walker living on Teaneck’s Rensselaer Road in 1965. He also discovered a better place to live. Soon after, the photographer, his wife, Mae, and their three small children moved from their apartment in a deteriorating building in the Bronx to a two-story, three-bedroom home on Voorhees Street.

“Teaneck chose me. I didn’t choose Teaneck,” said the 87-year-old, who was recently recognized by the Township Council as “one of this community’s most outstanding residents.”

His family’s accidental landing in Teaneck worked out, Stewart said. The children grew up and attended school in a suburban community known for embracing upwardly mobile minorities, and that freed Stewart to focus intensely on his career photographing the world’s most celebrated jazz and pop musicians.

Stewart’s youngest son, Chris, 51, said his father “went to work and we were safe here. Every now and then, if I didn’t know where he was, he’d leave a ticket stub on the kitchen table. He’d take us into the darkroom and show us the pictures. So we knew dad was exactly where he said he was. He wasn’t cheating on mom, that’s for sure!”

After they met their neighbors, Mae Stewart told her husband she was worried that they weren’t going to “keep up with the Joneses,” Stewart recalled. The neighborhood, a formerly Jewish area of town where real estate agents steered black families looking to move to Teaneck, became home to couples, many making nearly $100,000 annually.

Confidently, Stewart assured his wife, “What we do is make the Joneses keep up with us.”

That took some creative thinking. Even though he held a degree in fine arts from Ohio University — “I was probably one of the best-trained photographers in the world” — advertising agencies on New York’s Madison Avenue, which paid $1,500 per ad, weren’t falling over themselves to give work to African-American photographers over whites, who dominated the trade, Stewart recalled.

That didn’t bother him much, considering he had steady work photographing the likes of Gil-Scott Heron, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald and Sonny Rollins. But that work averaged just $150 per shoot. He eventually found work with a small ad agency and used his connections to bring home the finer things to his wife and children.

The agency had an account with the Stiffel Lamps Co., which sold household table lamps for $400 each. After Stewart photographed some of those lamps, the company parted with $1,200 worth of them for $75. Later, he shot a $1,200 dining room set and took it home for $150. The floor rugs for every room of the house cost him $500, instead of the $2,000 they would have cost him in a department store, he said.

“I got these things for practically nothing, so, in some instances, I probably made more money than my neighbors did,” Stewart said. The Stiffel lamps are still in his living room.

Stewart’s wife died in 1987. The business and the neighborhood changed over time, and he closed his New York City studio and moved his darkroom to his basement in the 1990s. He started to notice there were fewer children playing in front yards and more aging residents, like him, using canes. That cycle has recently reversed as young families have moved in again.

Stewart has long been a valued member of the community. Councilman Henry Pruitt, who lives a block from him on Voorhees Street, said neighborhood block parties wouldn’t be the same without Stewart’s peach cobbler.

Stewart has passed the recipe on to his son David, 56, who, he said, “makes it better than I do.” Stewart also has a daughter, Marsha, 58, who lives in Chicago.

Stewart prizes his jazz portfolio, from which images have been published in his book, “Jazz Files,” as well as in a number of publications, including Esquire and The New York Times. His photos have also been shown in exhibitions at Lincoln Center and at the bergenPAC in Englewood. In March, he was honored by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History during its annual jazz-appreciation celebration.

Fifty years after he moved to Teaneck, the now-retired photographer knows the stability that homeownership brought was good for his family and for his career.

“I never thought of myself as an intelligent person, in terms of the subject matter,” he said. “I was taking pictures of what I was assigned to do, in order to make a living for my family. That was my job.”
Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

** ↂ
————————————————————
This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
————————————————————

**
————————————————————
DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
————————————————————
The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=d11996e936) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=d11996e936&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

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Ben Tucker widow suing city, county for his death | WJCL News

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http://wjcl.com/2014/06/04/ben-tucker-widow-suing-city-county-for-his-death/

** Ben Tucker widow suing city, county for his death
————————————————————
By Chris BuchananPublished: June 4, 2014, 3:29 pmUpdated: June 4, 2014, 4:22 pm
tucker

** Related Coverage
————————————————————
*
** Play It Forward Concert honors Jazz great Ben Tucker (http://wjcl.com/2014/05/29/play-it-forward-concert-honors-jazz-great-ben-tucker/)
————————————————————
*
** Ben Tucker missed at Savannah Music Festival (http://wjcl.com/2014/03/19/ben-tucker-missed-at-savannah-music-festival/)
————————————————————
*
** Golf tournament in memory of Ben Tucker (http://wjcl.com/2013/09/06/golf-tournament-in-memory-of-ben-tucker/)
————————————————————
*
** Bond set for man charged with Ben Tucker’s death (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/21/bond-set-for-man-charged-with-ben-tuckers-death/)
————————————————————
*
** Jazz funeral held for Savannah musician Ben Tucker (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/10/jazz-funeral-held-for-savannah-musician-ben-tucker/)
————————————————————
*
** Funeral arrangements for jazz legend Ben Tucker (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/07/funeral-arrangements-set-for-jazz-legend-ben-tucker/)
————————————————————
*
** Man charged in Ben Tucker’s death appears in court (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/05/martin-charged-in-ben-tucker-death/)
————————————————————
*
** Savannah community reacts to Ben Tucker’s death (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/04/savannah-community-reacts-to-ben-tuckers-death/)
————————————————————
*
** Ga. jazz musician Ben Tucker killed in car crash (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/04/ga-jazz-musician-ben-tucker-killed-in-car-crash-2/)
————————————————————

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WJCL) – The wife of the late Ben Tucker announced this week that she is suing all parties involved in the accident (http://wjcl.com/2013/06/04/ga-jazz-musician-ben-tucker-killed-in-car-crash-2/) that killed the famous jazz great.

The lawsuit (https://lintvwjcl.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/tucker-lawsuit1.pdf) , which included the city, county and hotel where the incident occurred, was filed just days before today’s one year anniversary of Tucker’s death after a golf cart he was driving was struck by a vehicle on Grand Prix of America Avenue.

In the lawsuit, Gloria Tucker’s legal representative Paul M. Hoffman said that the plaintiff demands a trial by jury against the defendants for the full value of “the life of Tucker, his pre-death pain and suffering and his funeral expenses” – an amount to be determined by the jury.

Legal documents from Gloria Tucker’s legal counsel claim that Westin Resort owners not only knowingly ignored obvious safety concerns regarding fast driving on the aptly-named road but also chose to delay construction of safety barriers and moved existing ones.

The suit claims that the hotel and the city and county agreed to put up barriers and signs to prevent high speed driving but that the hotel failed to erect them in a timely manner. The city is also accused of taking down speed limit signs on the roadway which is owned, controlled and maintained by the city and county.

Both the city and county are named in the suit as negligent for not acting when the structures were not constructed in time.

The suit claims Tucker was crossing the road to get to his car which was in a resort-owned parking lot on the other side when he was struck.

Full lawsuit available here (https://lintvwjcl.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/tucker-lawsuit1.pdf) .
More on the anniversary memorial remembering Tucker’s life and the lawsuit tonight on WJCL News at 5 p.m., 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. this evening.
Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

** ↂ
————————————————————
This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
————————————————————

**
————————————————————
DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
————————————————————
The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=9cddd6bd1d) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=9cddd6bd1d&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

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Next-Best Thing to Living Next Door to Your Idol – NYTimes.com

https://www.jazzpromoservices.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/jazzpromo https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jazz-Promo-Services/216022288429676
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/nyregion/prime-real-estate-at-the-cemetery-is-a-plot-next-to-an-idol.html?hpw&rref=nyregion&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/nyregion/prime-real-estate-at-the-cemetery-is-a-plot-next-to-an-idol.html?hpw&rref=nyregion&_r=0)

** Next-Best Thing to Living Next Door to Your Idol
————————————————————

Photo
Victor Goines, a jazz saxophonist and clarinetist, at Woodlawn Cemetery, visiting the grave of Frankie Manning, an early creator of the Lindy hop. Credit Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
Continue reading the main story

During a break in a concert in the Bronx, Victor Goines, a jazz saxophonist and clarinetist, realized that he wanted to spend more time in that very place — a lot more time. Being there would put him close to people he idolized, like Duke Ellington, so he decided to spend $25,000 to buy the land behind the stage.

The land behind the stage was a cemetery plot, No. 10836 GR2-5, on a slope in the Hillcrest section of Woodlawn Cemetery. It is about 50 yards from where Ellington was buried in 1974, and he is not the only jazz great in the neighborhood.

“The location is prime real estate,” said Mr. Goines, who is 52 and does not plan to occupy the plot anytime soon. “I’m looking at Miles Davis, who’s right across the same intersection, and Illinois Jacquet, who’s a couple of plots below where I am.”

For Mr. Goines and others with similar ideas about where they want to be when they die, it is a different kind of hero worship, and puts a new twist on the real estate cliché “location, location, location.” It could be the ultimate form of devotion, putting yourself closer to someone you admired than you ever were in life — especially if the only words you ever spoke to a favorite celebrity were “Can I have your autograph?” or “Can I take a selfie with you?” — or it could be the ultimate way to elevate oneself. You may not be famous, but proximity to someone who was could bestow some prestige.
Photo
Duke Ellington is among the many great entertainers and jazz musicians buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx. Credit Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

It is one of those revealing, unexpected details of life, arranging in death to be slightly to the left or right of a Hollywood celebrity like Marilyn Monroe or a civil rights figure like Rosa Parks or someone else with a claim to fame when they were alive. It is not so surprising to people in the funeral business, though.

“It is much like it is if you want to live near your idols,” said Patti Bartsche, the editor of American Cemetery and American Funeral Director magazines. “It has the same cachet — ‘I’m going to be buried near Lionel Hampton’ or ‘I’m going to be buried near Michael Jackson.’ You want to have a connection to somebody who’s important in your life. People choose to be buried, if they choose to be buried, in a place that has meaning to them.”
Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story

X CLOSE

There are amateur sculptors who arranged to be buried near famous ones like the avant-garde artist Alexander Archipenko. One woman who works at Woodlawn bought a space for her mother near the crypt of Celia Cruz, the Latin music star. And Jacob Reginald Scott, a businessman who was an amateur drummer before his death in 2012, has an image of a drummer on his tombstone, close to the grave of the bebop pioneer Max Roach.

“He had so many records of all the people who are there, Miles Davis and Duke Ellington,” said his widow, Merri Hinkis-Scott. “He admired all the people he happens to be with now.”

And there are people like Pauline Smith, a jazz fan and swing dancer who plans to be buried at Woodlawn near Ellington and Frankie Manning, one of the early creators of the Lindy hop.
Photo

Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn is the resting place of many well-known residents, like James S.T. Stranahan, known as the “Father of Prospect Park.” Credit Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
Continue reading the main story

“Who knows what life is after death?” said Ms. Smith, a retired teacher who is 74 and lives in New Rochelle, N.Y. “Not knowing what it is, I want to enjoy the thing that brings the most joy to me in my life right now, so I want to be close to them.”

That is the same motivation that prompted Marty Markowitz, the former Brooklyn borough president, to buy a plot at Green-Wood Cemetery adjacent to the graves of two prominent Brooklynites from the 19th century, one a mayor in the days when Brooklyn was a city on its own. “That’s what I wanted even before I became borough president,” he said.

Not surprisingly, graves near the final resting places of famous people can carry premium prices. “Cemeteries love this kind of thing,” said Thomas A. Parmalee, the executive director of the publishing company that produces Ms. Bartsche’s magazines and a newsletter, Funeral Service Insider. “When there’s a plot that’s in demand, they can advertise for more money, though I don’t think they go out and advertise because that’s not politically correct.”

A crypt above Marilyn Monroe’s in a cemetery in Los Angeles had a winning bid of $4.6 million on eBay in 2009. The owner, a widow who wanted to pay off the $1 million mortgage her husband had left behind, moved his remains 23 years after he had been buried there. (In 1992, Hugh Hefner, the Playboy magazine founder, paid $75,000 for another crypt near Monroe’s.)

There were reports after Michael Jackson died in 2009 that prices for plots near his in Glendale, Calif., had jumped more than $2,000, to $9,900. And in 2006, after Rosa Parks died, the prices of crypts near where she and members of her family were entombed in a cemetery in Detroit climbed as much as $15,000.
Photo
A crypt above Marilyn Monroe’s in a cemetery in Los Angeles sold for $4.6 million on eBay in 2009.Credit Andrew Gombert/European Pressphoto Agency

Some cemeteries pre-empt price-gouging. After Jim Valvano, the Queens-born basketball coach who led North Carolina State to a national championship, died in 1993, Historic Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh, N.C., laid a sidewalk next to his grave “so that no one could buy that property and sell it at a higher rate,” said Robin Simonton, the executive director. “He was that important in Raleigh that there was a fear that someone would do it.”

She said that the plots closest to Mr. Valvano’s grave — a short walk away, on the sidewalk — now go for $4,000. One was taken when Lorenzo Charles, the player whose dunk won the 1983 championship game, died in 2011 in a bus crash.

At Woodlawn in the Bronx, Susan Olsen, the cemetery’s historian, said that Ellington bought his plot in the late 1950s. The spot he chose was not far from the grave of the singer Florence Mills, who died in 1927 and whom Ellington elegized in the song “Black Beauty” the following year.

Over the years, other jazz figures were buried in the same section of the cemetery, which covers more than 400 acres. Then, in 2000, when the tap dancer Harold Nicholas died, “he wanted to be as close to Ellington as possible,” Ms. Olsen said. “We contacted a family that had an unused space about 12 graves down and we bought it back from them for Harold Nicholas.”

The vibraphonist Lionel Hampton had his people call the cemetery about being buried in the same area, Ms. Olsen said. The cemetery was so eager to welcome him that it cut down a tree before anyone made any arrangements. “We didn’t hear a word until the night before he died” at 94 in 2002, Ms. Olsen said, “and his agent called to make sure we still had the place.”

Illinois Jacquet followed in 2004. And, several years later, Mr. Goines purchased his plot, with Ms. Olsen offering guidance.

“She was very strategic,” said Mr. Goines, who will play a free concert at Woodlawn at 7 p.m. Wednesday with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and Wynton Marsalis. “She said you should buy here because you want people to be able to look up the hill and see you. She said: ‘Don’t get behind Illinois Jacquet. No one’s going to see you there; he has a huge headstone.’ She wanted me to be visible and well received and seen when people come into the place.”
Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

** ↂ
————————————————————
This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
————————————————————

**
————————————————————
DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
————————————————————
The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

Unsubscribe (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]&c=fcf4b419de) | Update your profile (http://jazzpromoservices.us2.list-manage.com/profile?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=911f90f0b1&e=[UNIQID]) | Forward to a friend (http://us2.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=3186fe64133adb244b1010be2&id=fcf4b419de&e=[UNIQID])

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE ON THIS MAILING LIST PLEASE RESPOND WITH ‘REMOVE’ IN THE SUBJECT LINE. IF YOU ARE RECEIVING DUPLICATE EMAILS OUR APOLOGIES, JAZZ PROMO SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENT LIST IS GROWING LARGER EVERY DAY…..PLEASE LET US KNOW AND WE WILL FIX IT IMMEDIATELY!

Copyright (C) 2014 All rights reserved.

Jazz Promo Services
269 State Route 94 South
Warwick, Ny 10990
USA

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News from The Duke Ellington Center

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Logo Pic Only 3
THE DUKE ELLINGTON CENTER FOR THE ARTS

WE TOAST THE COLLABORATION OF
DUKE ELLINGTON AND DJANGO REINHARDT:
DJANGO and DJUKE – A Celebration of the Jazz Guitar
Sunday, June 15 at 2:30 PM
FREE! At the Bank Street Book Store – Broadway and 112th St.

Join guitarist Marc Daine and Mercedes Ellington,
plus other talents, as we pay homage to this legendary Gypsy musician!
___________________________________________________________

**
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Breaking News! Ellington in New York City 2016
Mercedes Ellington, Guest of Honor at the 22nd International Duke Ellington Study Group Conference in Amsterdam, is proud to announce that the 23rd International Conference will be held in 2016 in New York City, produced by The Duke Ellington Center for the Arts. Planning begins immediately. Watch this space as we progress.
Graveside Music

Honoring Ellington at The Woodlawn Cemetery on May 24
Mercedes Ellington, family, and friends paid tribute to the 40th anniversary of Ellington’s passing with the laying of a wreath and much more! Art Baron (trombone), James Zollar (trumpet), Mark Gross (sax) and Jennifer Vincent (bass) from AFTER MIDNIGHT were on hand to play, while Brothers from Duke’s fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha, conducted a service and presented a proclamation honoring Ellington. The surprise of the day was the spontaneous appearance of a group of swing dancers paying homage at the nearby grave of dance legend Frankie Manning. The group came bounding over and began to dance to the music when it wafted in their direction. It was a real happening and a wonderful tribute to The Maestro. He would have loved it madly.

Duke Way Sign
Duke Ellington Way
It was an exciting afternoon on June 4th asMercedes Ellington and the cast of AFTER MIDNIGHT unveiled Duke Ellington Way at Broadway and 47th Street. Art Baron, trombonist, who played in the last Ellington-led band was on hand, along with Dule Hill, Karine Plantandit, Jared Grimes, Adriane Lenox, and many other great talents appearing in the show. The event was widely covered in the media and certainly made a large street crown jump for joy!
Group
Check out the You Tube (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/aa523201c7) Channel for more images.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO WARREN CARLYLE,
WINNER OF THE TONY AWARD FOR BEST CHOREOGRAPHY: AFTER MIDNIGHT

IT’S A GREAT SHOW! DON’T MISS IT! SAVE 35% WITH
THIS SPECIAL OFFER
JUST $79 – ORCHESTRA/FRONT MEZZANINE
Visit TICKETMASTER (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/16b61e81d4) and use code JAZZ

Broadway’s Cotton Club Musical features Ellington
and Ellington-arranged music, performed by a superlative cast of musicians, singers and dancers.

And Don’t Forget These New CDs from the Manhattan School of Music
Symph Elling
THE SYMPHONIC ELLINGTON, led by Justin DiCioccio, features Ellington’s rarely performed orchestral works, and QUE VIVA HARLEM, led by Bobby Sanabria, has Ellington”s “Oclupaca” and Billy Strayhorn’s last work, “Blood Count.” Both CDs/downloads are available from Jazzheads.com (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/8b8f66f238) , amazon (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/cad0d8d7a3) .com (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/676a531e88) and iTunes.apple.com (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/a4d31178b0)

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SHOP! SHOP! SHOP!
Go to www.smile.amazon.com (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/5b90420bee) and choose The Duke Ellington Center for the Arts as your favorite charity. When you shop, Amazon will donate 0.5% of your purchase to us! How cool is that! It”s a fabulous win-win! If you purchase The Maestro”s CDs and MP3s it”s a double whammy!

The mission of THE DUKE ELLINGTON CENTER FOR THE ARTS is
to preserve, promote and further the music and philosophy
of this American genius through performance and education.
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There”s a lot more upcoming from
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Your ongoing support and commitment to our mission is a
vital part of the work.
Please contribute via PayPal at: http://tinyurl.com/kdoylpk (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheDukeEllingtonCent/47be99a3bc/7165fb763b/eb002f143d)

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The Duke Ellington Center for the Arts
211 Duke Ellington Blvd.
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Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

** ↂ
————————————————————
This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
————————————————————

**
————————————————————
DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
————————————————————
The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

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Vince Giordano @ ARSC Meeting Thursday, June 19th 7 P. M.

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ARSC New York Chapter
JUNE 2014 Meeting
7 P. M. Thursday, 6/19/14
at the CUNY Sonic Arts Center
West 140^th Street & Convent Avenue, New York
or enter at 138th Street off Convent Avenue
Shepard Hall (the Gothic building) – Recital Hall (Room 95, Basement level)

** An elevator is located in the center of the building
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Vince Giordano
jazz historian and leader of The Nighthawks
will discuss the music from Boardwalk Empire
Grammy-winner Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs appeared in films (The Cotton Club, The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Revolutionary Road, and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) and for concerts at the Town Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Other recording projects include soundtracks for Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World, Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, Robert DeNiro’s The Good Shepherd, Sam Mendes’s Away We Go, Michael Mann’s film Public Enemies, and John Krokidas’s feature, Kill Your Darlings; along with HBO’s Grey Gardens, Todd Haynes’s HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce and an upcoming Haynes’ film called Carol. The Nighthawks are also seen and heard in the USA Network series Royal Pains and the PBS series Michael Feinstein’s American Songbook.

A Brooklyn native, Vince Giordano’s passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 rpm recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period: Whiteman’s hot arranger Bill Challis; drummer Chauncey Morehouse; and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordano’s knowledge, passion, and commitment to authenticity led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players, the Nighthawks.

Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation. This summer, Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will perform at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing; Town Hall’s American premiere of Cole Porter’s La Ambassadeur Review; Music Mountain; Old Westbury Gardens; Kingsborough College; Pier 84’s Moon Dance; the Newport Jazz Festival; Morgan Park in Great Neck; and Levitt Pavillion in Westport, CT. Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks can be heard every Monday and Tuesday at Iguana NYC.

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This evening’s program is the last before our summer recess. We will resume either in September or October. Mailing list members will be notified of our first meeting by Labor Day.

HAVE A HAPPY SUMMER!

** ↂ
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**
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DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
Subway: Take the 1 train to 137^th Street City College and walk north to 140^th St. & Broadway,
then go east to 140^th St. & Convent Avenue. Take the A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St, (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue, and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West of Convent Avenue.)

** ↂ
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The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their program provides an in-depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history to help them compete in a field that today demands
an ever-growing and highly diverse skill set.

All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!

To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org

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RIP Alan Douglas

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Jimmy Giuffre’s Music Finds New Appreciation – NYTimes.com

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/08/arts/music/jimmy-giuffres-music-finds-new-appreciation.html

** Jimmy Giuffre’s Music Finds New Appreciation
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Photo
A rigorous composer, clarinetist and tenor saxophonist, Jimmy Giuffre made a conscientious break from the jazz mainstream in the 1960s; by today’s standards, his music sounds quite modern. Credit Herb Snitzer

It’s anyone’s guess what Jimmy Giuffre was thinking when he improvised the stark, intriguing solo clarinet pieces intended for his 1962 Columbia album, “Free Fall.” Along with the five that made the cut (http://youtu.be/UDGb1ex1Kc8) , there were five others that saw the light of day some 35 years later, as bonus tracks on an overdue reissue. Small gems of oblique investigation, they bear titles that seem to hint at Giuffre’s state of mind; among them is one with a lonesome air, played in shadowy subtones, that he called “Time Will Tell.”

That would have made a decent mantra for Mr. Giuffre (pronounced JOO-free), who died in 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/26/arts/music/26giuffre.html) , of complications of Parkinson’s disease. A rigorous composer, clarinetist and tenor saxophonist, he’d had a few tastes of critical and commercial success before “Free Fall,” which also features the bassist Steve Swallow and the pianist Paul Bley, and belongs to the small category of jazz recordings that truly were ahead of their time. Its dismal reception cost Giuffre his recording contract and his momentum: He didn’t make another album for a decade, missing the peak years of the ’60s avant-garde.
Photo
Seeking recognition in Europe: In Germany in 1961, from left, Carla Bley, Paul Bley, Steve Swallow, Jimmy Giuffre and Juanita Giuffre.Credit Juanita Giuffre

“The Jimmy Giuffre 3 & 4: New York Concerts” (Elemental), due out on Tuesday, is a startling dispatch from that season in exile. Comprising a pair of previously uncirculated live recordings from 1965, it illuminates a murky period in Giuffre’s career. Atypically for him, both sessions feature a drummer, the superbly alert Joe Chambers, who brings a firm rhythmic push without muddying the music’s intent. “They sound great together, just so natural and flowing,” said the trumpeter and composer Dave Douglas. “If they had made a Blue Note (http://www.bluenote.com/) record, it would be considered one of the big classics of the period.”

The urge is almost irresistible, when discussing Giuffre, to dwell on what might have been. But the new release also encourages some thoughts of what might yet be. It happens to arrive at a moment of growing admiration for Giuffre among current jazz musicians drawn to his chamberlike counterpoint and thoughtfully abstracted form.

There are more of those now than there were even five years ago, when the guitarist Joel Harrison and the drummer George Schuller formed Whirrr (http://joelharrison.com/projects/whirrr) , a Giuffre repertory band whose ranks include the trombonist Jacob Garchik and the saxophonist Ohad Talmor. Mr. Douglas, Mr. Swallow and the Doxas brothers (Chet on reeds, Jim on drums) make up Riverside, a Giuffre-inspired quartet that released its self-titled debut album (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/15/arts/music/new-rocordings-by-riverside-jessica-lea-mayfield-and-august-alsina.html) this spring. And the Swiss-born trombonist Samuel Blaser has a sharply realized tribute — “Spring Rain,” featuring the saxophonist Ravi Coltrane — due out next year. “His music sounds like today’s music,” Mr. Blaser said of Giuffre, voicing a common theme.

Born in Dallas in 1921, Giuffre began playing clarinet at the age of 9. He earned a music degree from North Texas State Teachers College, and after a stint in the Army, he established himself as a composer-arranger. “Four Brothers (http://youtu.be/hK_9otl3sZ0) ,” which he wrote in 1947 for the Woody Herman Orchestra, became a popular anthem for the band.
Continue reading the main story

Its central feature — a smoothly blended yet boppish line for the saxophone section — pointed in the direction of West Coast cool jazz. Giuffre took part in that boom, notably as a member of the Lighthouse All-Stars (http://youtu.be/5g1JIqG_P8Q) , but by the mid-’50s, he had adopted a more purely contrapuntal ideal. “I’ve come to feel increasingly inhibited and frustrated by the insistent pounding of the rhythm section,” he declared in the liner notes to one of his albums, stating his preference for a beat that’s “acknowledged but unsounded.”

He carried that fairly outré conviction forward with a small series of drummerless groups, starting with the Jimmy Giuffre 3, featuring Ralph Peña on bass and Jim Hall on guitar. A subsequent edition, with Hall and the valve trombonist Bob Brookmeyer, appeared in the film “Jazz on a Summer’s Day (http://youtu.be/pfLsEH4csQ4) .” That trio’s intuitive rapport, along with its feel for pastoral Americana and the blues, made it an approachable outlier during jazz’s commercial heyday of the mid to late ’50s — and an influential one since then, with stylistic heirs including the guitarist Bill Frisell.

But it’s the Giuffre 3 with Mr. Bley and Mr. Swallow that present-day musicians cite most often as an influence. Giuffre formed this trio after an encounter with Ornette Coleman in 1959 at the Lenox School of Jazz, a summer program in Massachusetts. Struck not only by Mr. Coleman’s force of sound on saxophone but also by his radically unrestricted notions of tonality and structure, Giuffre abruptly changed his own direction.

“We rehearsed incessantly as a trio,” Mr. Swallow recalled, “and often there was more talking than playing at the rehearsals.” The driving subject was a pursuit of atonality and rhythmic license, and yet Giuffre distributed complete scores for his compositions. “There was this wonderful paradox,” Mr. Swallow said. “The music was wild and woolly on the one hand, and on the other, he was really insistent on the fidelity to the notes on the page, and on a kind of ethic of contrapuntal interrelations that governed the music.”

The trio’s first two albums, released on Verve in 1961 and reissued on ECM just over 30 years later, have a restless elegance, with themes either by Giuffre or Carla Bley, who was married to Mr. Bley at the time. The group received encouragement from contemporary composers like Stockhausen and Cage, and at least a few in the jazz fold saw its music as in tune with that genre. Mr. Chambers, the drummer, said that when he heard “Free Fall,” it connected with the Schoenberg and Webern he’d been studying in college.

Mr. Bley, when asked about the trio’s affinities with classical modernism, replied in an email that the idea was hogwash. (Not his exact wording.) “Giuffre started as a jazz composer and played jazz all his life,” he said. And the music readily supports that interpretation, though jazz audiences didn’t at the time. In a story that Mr. Swallow delights in retelling, the trio played its final gig at a coffeehouse on Bleecker Street, after dividing the earnings from the door and coming up with 35 cents apiece.

Giuffre licked his wounds but kept furthering his concept, even as jazz’s vanguardist energies began to solidify around Mr. Coleman and the expeditious fervor of John Coltrane. Giuffre appeared in “The October Revolution in Jazz,” a pioneering free-jazz festival organized by the trumpeter Bill Dixon in 1964. But revolution, as a cultural and rhetorical strategy, wasn’t really at the heart of his enterprise. The compositions he was playing in 1965 have titles related either to geometry (“Angles,” “Quadrangle”) or movement (“Syncopate,” “Drive”). As a white musician who’d made a conscientious break from the jazz mainstream — and by all accounts, a figure of earnest, gentle introversion — he was crucially out of step with the black nationalist spirit of the age.
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Mr. Chambers, who had recorded with the trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and the pianist Andrew Hill, was strongly connected to the African-American jazz pulse, and his work on “The Jimmy Giuffre 3 & 4: New York Concerts” is fine and bracing. The first of the two dates took place in May, a few months after Giuffre’s new trio had been booed at a concert in Paris, playing opposite Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. The addition of Mr. Chambers to Giuffre’s band, which otherwise included the pianist Don Friedman and the bassist Barre Phillips, could have been intended as a corrective.

Whatever the case, the quartet — taped without an audience in an auditorium at Columbia University by George Klabin for his student radio show on WKCR — benefits enormously from the presence of drums. “I knew the concept,” Mr. Chambers said, “and I tried to stay out of the way.” But in addition to executing Giuffre’s notated drum parts, which involved great gulps of silence, he brought a sense of smartly grounded propulsion — and implicitly, a link to the evolving post-bop tradition.

Mr. Klabin recorded Giuffre again in September at Judson Hall, across the street from Carnegie Hall, on a concert that also featured the Charles Lloyd Quartet. And while Giuffre kept Mr. Chambers, he used no piano this time, and enlisted the prominent bassist Richard Davis. There are no boos. The music doesn’t quite feel settled — Mr. Davis said he suspects it was the only time he ever worked with Giuffre — but it has an essential gravity. Working with bass and drums, Giuffre favors the tenor, occasionally flashing signs of his admiration for Sonny Rollins. He also includes “Crossroads,” an early piece by Mr. Coleman, offering it like a totem.

“New York Concerts” was produced by Zev Feldman, who acquired the rights from Giuffre’s widow, Juanita, and Mr. Klabin. Along with provoking a reappraisal of Giuffre’s lost decade, it may lead to more of his music being heard. Mr. Friedman said he had already noticed the tide beginning to turn; he has been booked to play a Giuffre tribute with the clarinetist and tenor saxophonist Ken Peplowski, on Sept. 13 at the Kitano New York hotel.

There’s probably no single reason that Giuffre, who taught at the New England Conservatory for more than 15 years, couldn’t personally inspire the reverence now found among younger players. Mr. Schuller and Mr. Douglas each had him as a teacher and said they wished they’d known to take advantage of his insights.

“I think what Jimmy was looking to achieve was a particular state of heightened alertness on the bandstand,” Mr. Swallow said, “with a sense of the individual parts and their relationship to the whole.” That sounds a lot like a prescription from the current moment in jazz, which raises a possibility: that for once, at least in this sense, the timing might work out in Giuffre’s favor.

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Ways to Spend a Virtual Day With Louis Armstrong – NYTimes.com

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** Ways to Spend a Virtual Day With Louis Armstrong
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Photo
Jason Prover, with tie, and Ricky Riccardi at the Queens College archive. Credit Willie Davis for The New York Times
Continue reading the main story

MAYBE it was the 50th anniversary of “Hello, Dolly” having knocked the Beatles off the top of the pop charts (May 9, 1964), but it occurred to me recently that with a little advance work, I could spend an entire day in New York with Louis Armstrong.

Yes, I know, that idea seems absurd at first. Even a devoted fan like me has to acknowledge that as much as his music lives on, Armstrong, the renowned jazz musician and beloved entertainer known worldwide as Satchmo, died on July 6, 1971.

But he died in his sleep in the king-size bed on the second floor of his modest brick-clad house on 107th Street in Corona, Queens. His widow, Lucille, eventually left the house to the city, and it has been preserved largely as it was in his last days — right down to a bathrobe and a pair of slippers — and is open to the public six days a week. That would be my first stop.

The same people who curate the Louis Armstrong House Museum oversee a collection of Armstrong papers, commercial and homemade recordings, artwork and memorabilia. The archive is housed in the library of Queens College in Flushing and is open to anyone who calls ahead to arrange an appointment. And if you bring your own mouthpiece, you can play one of five Armstrong trumpets kept there. I’ve studied the trumpet for nearly 50 years, with lackluster results. I do own a number of mouthpieces. So my afternoon was booked.
Photo

Clockwise from left, A display at the Louis Armstrong House Museum; John Douglas Thompson as Louis Armstrong in “Satchmo at the Waldorf” at the Westside Theater and trumpets thatwere owned by Armstrong. Credit Clockwise: Willie Davis for The New York Times; Sara Krulwich/The New York Times; Willie Davis for The New York Times

I planned to move into the evening with a cocktail at Birdland, the jazz club in the theater district, where every Wednesday for the last 16 years, the tuba-playing lawyer David Ostwald has led a band devoted to preserving the infectiously swinging musical style introduced by Armstrong’s pioneering small group recordings of the 1920s.

From there, it would be just a short walk to the Westside Theater on 43rd Street to catch the 8 p.m. performance of “Satchmo at the Waldorf,” the one-man show written by the Armstrong biographer and The Wall Street Journal’s theater critic Terry Teachout. John Douglas Thompson portrays an ailing and somewhat embittered Armstrong reminiscing in his dressing room after what would be one of his last public performances. Mr. Thompson also does turns as Joe Glaser, the white manager who controlled Armstrong’s life and career (some say not always in his client’s best interests), and a grumpy Miles Davis, who criticized Armstrong for what he considered a racially demeaning stage persona.

Sometime during this day, I was hoping to grab a plate of red beans and rice, Satchmo’s favorite dish.

I woke up on my Louis Armstrong day and did what I do many mornings: played him performing “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo.” There are more important recordings among the 100-odd Armstrong numbers on my smartphone: his “West End Blues,” with its eight-bar opening cadenza that plants a signpost to guide all jazz musicians to come, or the sublime duets with Ella Fitzgerald from the ’50s. But I’d introduced this song from Disney’s “Cinderella” into my routine during a gloomy winter spell, because it displays Armstrong’s ability to transcend trite material, infusing it with musical integrity and good humor. I smile every time I hear it. Sometimes I laugh out loud.

“Louis was a musical alchemist,” the director of the Louis Armstrong House Museum, Michael Cogswell, told me later that morning. “He could take the most stupid Tin Pan Alley ditty and turn it into high art.”
Photo

David Ostwald (playing the tuba) and his Louis Armstrong Eternity Band at Birdland, the Manhattan jazz club. Credit Willie Davis for The New York Times
Continue reading the main story

Starting in the basement gift shop and gallery, Mr. Cogswell walked me through the house, which is remarkable mostly for its modesty. Except for an elaborately mirrored guest bathroom with gold-plated fixtures and a futuristic kitchen (considering when it was installed, in 1970) with lacquered custom cabinetry, Louis and Lucille lived in middle-class style. He made lots of money. The week I was visiting coincided with Armstrong’s “Hello, Dolly” chart-topping milestone. He kept the gold record on the wall of his den.

“I don’t want to be any more than I am,” Armstrong wrote to a British biographer less than a year before he died. “What I don’t have, I don’t need it.”

He often toured 300 days a year, and when he landed at home, he spent much of his time in his wood-paneled second-floor den, making mixtapes on his two reel-to-reel recorders and decorating the tape boxes with elaborate and often humorous collages.

Those boxes and tapes are stored at Queens College, where I met the archivist Ricky Riccardi that afternoon. Mr. Riccardi, 33, was first captivated by Armstrong’s recording of “St. Louis Blues” at the age of 15. He has since learned so much about Satchmo that friends call him Rickipedia. His book about Armstrong’s later years, “What a Wonderful World,” was published in 2011.

“We have 750 tapes made by Louis that we’ve transferred to CDs,” Mr. Riccardi said. “He was creating this archive throughout his life. There’s almost nothing he does not talk about — racism, threatening to retire unless he got a special permit to smoke marijuana, him telling dirty jokes.”
Photo

Third-grade students from P.S. 33 at the museum, looking at logs of Armstrong’s home recordings in the den of his former home in Corona, Queens. Credit Willie Davis for The New York Times

Armstrong even taped himself drunkenly propositioning his wife for sex and the strange, funny and poignant conversation that followed, in which Lucille accuses him of thinking only about sex. Armstrong counters that he has another primary concern. “You know that horn comes first,” he tells his wife, “then you and Joe Glaser.” While listening to that recording and some others, I felt at times what Mr. Cogswell said he’d experienced when he first heard them: I got chills from their unvarnished intimacy.

I asked Mr. Riccardi if I could play one of Satchmo’s horns. “Sure,” he said. “Did you bring your mouthpiece?” I had forgotten my mouthpiece.

Good thing, because I probably would have tried to play that revolutionary opening to “West End Blues,” which is something I’ve practiced many, many times and never once played right. Not even close.

The Canadian trumpeter Bria Skonberg can almost nail it. These days, she is a regular member of the Louis Armstrong Eternity Band at Birdland on Wednesdays. The evening I visited, during a break between sets that included “Sleepy Time Down South” and “Swing That Music,” the bandleader, Mr. Ostwald, explained that his goal was more to salute Armstrong’s spirit than to imitate his sound.

“There are people occasionally who ask us to recreate Louis,” Mr. Ostwald said. “And I say, ‘No, we can’t.’ And sometimes, when I use a new trumpet player for the first time, he or she might ask, ‘Do I have to play like Louis?’ And I say: ‘What, are you kidding? Nobody can.’ ”
Photo

Boxes of Armstrong’s audiotapes decorated with collages he made himself. Credit Willie Davis for The New York Times

When I met Mr. Thompson on the sidewalk outside the Westside Theater after watching his performance as Armstrong in “Satchmo at the Waldorf,” he said much the same thing. He has played Satchmo nearly 200 times, and gives a skilled and subtle portrayal of a lifelong entertainment workhorse facing his inevitable decline with a cantankerous pride and a certain wounded dignity. Mr. Thompson never overtly imitates Armstrong, though he steps up to the precipice a few times. Those moments, he explained, help build a foundation for the very last scene when, standing stooped a bit and wearing a golf hat and windbreaker, the actor dons the kind of thick-framed black glasses Armstrong wore and, without saying a word, becomes the man.
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Mr. Thompson spent a number of days at the Armstrong house and archives preparing for the role, studying video and audiotapes. “Once you touch the guy, you’re changed,” he said. “The play gave me contact. Research gave me contact, and that contact gave me love. I love this guy.”

Me, too. It was late then, and I decided to head home, never having found red beans and rice, but full in other ways. Before I went to sleep, I played another song from Armstrong’s Disney recording, “When You Wish Upon a Star.” I’d learned this day about a letter Satchmo wrote to the producer of the record telling him that the song was so beautiful that he was listening to his own rendition of it three or four times every night.

That was all the recommendation I needed.

Words and Music (and Furniture)

LOUIS ARMSTRONG HOUSE MUSEUM 34-56 107th Street, Corona, Queens; open Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday noon to 5; 718-478-8274, louisarmstronghouse.org.

ARMSTRONG ARCHIVES Rosenthal Library, Queens College, by appointment. Click on Museum Collections at louisarmstronghouse.org.

DAVID OSTWALD’S LOUIS ARMSTRONG ETERNITY BAND Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m., Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, Clinton; 212-581-3080, birdlandjazz.com.

‘SATCHMO AT THE WALDORF’ Westside Theater, 407 West 43rd Street, Clinton; 212-239-6200, telecharge.com.

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Eric Offner, the founder & president of The Sidney Bechet Society, passed on, early Tuesday morning.

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Greetings jazz lovers, and longtime friends,

It is with sadness that we report that Eric Offner, the
founder & president of The Sidney Bechet Society,
passed on, early Tuesday morning.

Eric’s declining health had prevented him from attending
our last two concerts. He passed quietly in his sleep, in
the comfort of his own home, where he had hosted many
SBS events over the years.

A memorial service will be held on Long Island,
Sunday, June 8th, at 1:30pm, at the
Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Shelter Rock (http://www.uucsr.org/discover/getting-to-shelter-rock/)
48 Shelter Rock Rd, Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 627-6560

A further memorial, in Manhattan, will follow in the
coming months. We will keep you informed & updated.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be sent to:
Drug Fighters School
c/o Reach the Children
Attn: Mary Harris, Executive Director
14 Chesham Way, Fairport, NY 14450

All the best,
Donald, Phil, Geri and the SBS family

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Phil Stern
philstern5@aol.com (mailto:philstern5@aol.com)
516-209-1437
The Sidney Bechet Society
www.sidneybechet.org (http://www.sidneybechet.org/)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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LondonJazzCollector | Adventures in collecting “modern jazz”

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** LondonJazzCollector (http://londonjazzcollector.wordpress.com/)
————————————————————

** Adventures in collecting “modern jazz”: the classical music of America from the Fifties and Sixties, on original vinyl, on a budget, from England. And writing about it
————————————————————

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Doyle New York to Auction the Jazz Collection of Bruce Lundvall on June 25, 2014 – 2805 – Doyle New York

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** Philip Harrison Hays American, 1931-2005 Bessie Smith – The World’s Greatest Blues Singer, 1970 (CBS 66258)
————————————————————

Estimate: $1,000 – 1,500

Jim Marshall American, 1936-2010 Miles Davis at Newman’s Gym, 1971 Robert L. Weaver American, 1924-1994 Charlie Parker, Bird with Strings: Live at the Apollo, Carnegie Hall and Birdland Marshall Arisman American, b. 1937 Bud Powell Paul Davis American, b. 1938 Clifford Brown: The Beginning and the End 1952/56, reissued 1973 Philip Harrison Hays American, 1931-2005 Bessie Smith – The World’s Greatest Blues Singer, 1970 (CBS 66258) Robert Weaver American, 1924-1994 Charlie Parker, 1977 Thomas B. Allen American, 1928-2004 (i) Lester Young (ii) Eric Gale – I Know that’s Right Laszlo Kubinyi American, 20th Century Thelonious Monk, Straight No Chaser Thomas B. Allen American, 1928-2004 Lester Young – The Lester Young Story Volume 1, 1975 Bruce Mitchell American, 1908-1963 Jazz Orchestra from the Wings Robert Andrew Parker American, b. 1927 Art Tatum, Piano Starts Here, 1968 Ink and watercolor on paper 17 x 17 i… Al Hirschfeld American, 1903-2003 Bruce with Sax Robert Weaver
American, 1924-1994 Coleman Hawkins/Clark Terry – Back in Brown’s Bag, 1963 John Berg American, 20th Century Dexter Gordon – Homecoming: Live at the Village Vanguard, 1977 Thomas B. Allen American, 1928-2004 Lester Young

** DOYLE NEW YORK TO AUCTION THE JAZZ COLLECTION OF BRUCE LUNDVALL ON JUNE 25, 2014
————————————————————

** Longtime President of Blue Note Records
————————————————————

** The Bruce Lundvall Collection Will Be Offered as a Featured Section of the June 25 Doyle at Home Auction
————————————————————

** The Collection Comprises Approximately Thirty Lots of Original Jazz Album Cover Art, Photographs and Ephemera
————————————————————

Doyle New York is honored to auction a remarkable collection of original album cover art, rare photography and related ephemera assembled by Bruce Lundvall, longtime president of the renowned Jazz label, Blue Note Records. During his half-century in the music industry at record labels Columbia, CBS, Elektra, Manhattan (EMI) and finally Blue Note, Bruce Lundvall discovered and signed a number of Jazz legends.

The Bruce Lundvall Collection comprises approximately thirty lots documenting the history of Jazz. Featured items include the original artwork for Thelonious Monk’s groundbreaking album, Straight, No Chaser (Colombia: 1966) and Charlie Parker’s Bird with Strings: Live at the Apollo, Carnegie Hall and Birdland (CBS: 1977), as well as a rare 1972 photograph (printed in 1982) of Miles Davis that captures the mercurial genius in a boxing ring at a San Francisco gym. Additional highlights include original album artwork for a number of jazz legends, among them Art Tatum, Woody Shaw, Bessie Smith, Lester Young, Bud Powell and others.

The Bruce Lundvall Collection will be offered as a featured section of the Doyle at Home auction on June 25, 2014 at 10am. The public is invited to the exhibition on view from June 21 through 24 at Doyle New York.

The Internet catalgue for the Bruce Lundvall Collection will be available on Wednesday, June 11. Please check back.

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Buddy Bolden biopic to resume production, but without Anthony Mackie | NOLA.com

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** Buddy Bolden biopic to resume production, but without Anthony Mackie
————————————————————
buddy bolden and band circa 1905.jpg

Hyatt Hotels scion Dan Pritzker is finally ready to resume production on his long-gestating biopic on New Orleans jazz pioneer Buddy Bolden. But he’s going to have to do it without leading man Anthony Mackie (http://topics.nola.com/tag/anthony%20mackie/index.html) , according to Deadline. (http://www.deadline.com/2014/05/seven-years-after-production-began-dan-pritzkers-bolden-skeds-new-shoot-sans-star-anthony-mackie/)

The planned three-month shoot for “Bolden!” — which Pritzker wrote and is directing — will be the third round of production on the film, which is described on IMDB as “a mythical account of … the first Cornet King of New Orleans.” It first went before cameras in 2007, and then underwent reshoots in 2009. This latest round will see Pritzker reshoot approximately half of his film.

Mackie, a New Orleans native who has seen his star rise significantly since production began — thanks to roles in such films as “The Hurt Locker (http://topics.nola.com/tag/hurt%20locker/index.html) ” and “Captain America: The Winter Soldier (http://topics.nola.com/tag/captain%20america/index.html) ” — participated in both of those shoots, which took place in New Orleans and in Wilmington, N.C. This time, however, he will be replaced Gary Carr (“Downton Abbey”).

Other cast members — at least in the previous shoots — include Jackie Earle Haley, Michael Rooker, Omari Hardwick and Mackie’s fellow New Orleanian Wendell Pierce. Locally reared jazzman Wynton Marsalis composed the film’s score.

The project, which Pritzker is self-financing, has cost a reported $30 million. So far. But as a billionaire member of Forbes’ list of the 400 richest Americans, he’s got pockets deep enough to keep shooting until he gets the film the way he likes it. “Obviously, I’ve had a steep learning curve, and I just decided that I wanted to tell the story in a different way than I had captured it,” he told Deadline’s Mike Fleming Jr. in a story published this week.

The three-month shoot for “Bolden!” is expected to take place largely in Wilmington.

The talented but troubled Bolden is among the more colorful characters in New Orleans’ exceedingly colorful jazz history. A cornet player, he was a huge draw in his hometown of New Orleans in the early 1900s, with “Funky Butt (Buddy Bolden’s Blues)” among his more celebrated numbers, one widely covered by other musicians.

Bolden’s career was hampered, however, by a struggle with mental illness — before it was halted all together by the onset of what is described as alcohol-related psychosis. By the time he was 30, he was institutionalized at the Louisiana State Insane Asylum at Jackson, where he lived for the remainder of his life. He died at 54 years old and was buried in a pauper’s cemetery in New Orleans.

His musical influence, however, long outlasted him. No known recordings of his work exist, and facts about his life have become intermingled with no small amount of mythology. This much is certain, though: Bolden’s improvisation-heavy blend of ragtime and blues — which he performed with his Bolden Band under the name King Bolden — is widely recognized as an originator of the musical form that would become jazz.

“Bolden!” isn’t the first time Pritzker has been motivated to make a film about a New Orleans jazz icon. He also wrote and directed a black-and-white silent film on the early years of Louis Armstrong, titled “Louis” and also featuring Mackie as Bolden. That film has played a handful of one-offs but has yet to land a distribution deal.

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The art of noise: how music recording has changed over the decades | Music | The Guardian

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** The art of noise: how music recording has changed over the decades
————————————————————
giant exponential horn
Big audio dinosaur … the giant exponential horn at the Science Museum. Photograph: Jennie Hills

One of the great changes in the British countryside is that hedgerows and verges no longer glisten in the way they did 20 years ago. No longer does the sunlight catch the strands of tape that used to festoon thorns and grasses, lost reminders of another cassette jammed in the car stereo. It would eject, but would emerge trailing a loop of slender, slippery tape, the end snagged deep in the player’s insides. A helpful passenger might tease it free and painstakingly spool the tape back into its case, ready to play and jam again; more likely they would rip it from the machine and throw it out of the window.

Driving today has fewer distractions, hour after hour passing as the MP3 player shuffles through its enormous repertoire, and listening at home is equally trouble-free, a laptop and headphones doing away with the need for all those records, cassettes, CDs, turntables, amplifiers, wires and speakers. So much time filled, so much space saved; never before has music been so available and yet so immaterial. Perhaps it’s this immateriality that has provoked a revival of interest in older audio technologies, in ways of recording and listening that involve something more tangible than a stream of digital code. Tellingly, this is a revival led by people too young to have used these technologies when they were state of the art, probably even too young to have thrown that cassette tape (http://www.theguardian.com/music/cassette-tape) out of the car window. It’s this generation that is buying vinyl (http://www.theguardian.com/music/vinyl) , and it’s musicians of the same generation who
are making the records, experimenting with tape recorders and enthusing about analogue sound.

Some of this is fashion, of course, an audio equivalent of steampunk or hipster beard-growth, but there’s something more significant going on as well. The march of progress has taken us from innovation to innovation – mechanical to electrical, 78 to 33⅓, mono to stereo, LP to CD, Walkman to iPod – each new technology overwhelming us with its superiority and the way it solved recurrent problems in audio engineering – fidelity in recording, more signal and less noise in playback, longer listening times. Resistance was futile because the two halves of the recording industry marched hand in hand, phasing out production of older playback equipment as new formats were introduced.
audio cassette tapes Missing from the English countryside … old audio cassette tapes. Photograph: Alamy

Only now, when that march seems to have reached some sort of destination – all the music in the world available at any time, usually at little or no cost, in crystal-clear recordings – is it possible to question whether this is really where we want to be, or whether we might instead like to revisit some of the points along the way. It’s this retrospection that is allowing us to take pleasure in the special characteristics of old recording formats, to savour the realisation that technologies are not transparent, but put their particular stamp on the experience which they mediate. Etching, silk screen and lithography have all been superseded by more efficient printing methods, but visual artists continue to use them; perhaps music has reached this point too.

A process such as etching, cutting an image into a plate and then printing it affects what can be depicted and how we see it. In the same way, recording formats shape how musicians work and how we listen. Pop songs are short and sharp because in the days of analogue recording a song could last no longer than the time it took the gramophone needle to cross the narrow gap between the edge of the record and the maker’s label in the middle. Whether it was a 10-inch shellac disc turning at 78rpm, or a seven-inch single turning at 45rpm, the musical discipline was the same: there was time for variety – introduction, verse, chorus, middle eight, instrumental – but there had to be a beginning, middle and end too.

How the music was recorded was also important. For the first 50 years of the recording era the manufactured cylinder or disc was a duplicate of a live performance. As the musicians played, the disturbances they created in the air were caught by a horn, later a microphone, and etched into a groove. But with the advent of magnetic tape it became possible to combine layers of time, recording different performances side by side on the same length of tape. As tape technology developed in the 50s and 60s, the number of tracks multiplied, and musicians’ imaginations could wander through a labyrinth of takes, re-takes, overdubs and patches. With more and more tracks available nothing needed to be thrown away; recording became a sort of musical hoarding. Not sure about the bass line? Don’t delete it, just mute that track and add another version.

Multiple options can breed indecision, otherwise known as remixing. The history of pop music in the 1970s is full of tales of release dates postponed while artists agonised over how to create a definitive version out of all that accrued studio time, stacked up, track upon track, on the master tape. In the 1980s indecision became a marketing strategy – release one mix, then another, then another. In the age of the internet indecision was even promoted as a sort of shared creativity – don’t decide, just put everything you’ve got online and let the fans do the work.

But it is recording formats that matter most to listeners, and now that the LP is with us again it’s easy to see why we missed it. There’s room for enough of one sort of music – a Brahms symphony, Kind of Blue – but not too much. There’s a necessary break which, especially in pop music, imposes a set of helpful creative questions: is side two a variation of side one or should each new side offer a new style, a new energy? Above all, analogue formats remind us that in recording and listening we don’t have to be passive. In an age when we can wallpaper our lives with a random shuffle of MP3s, there’s something splendidly willed about choosing to put a record on a turntable. It’s a choice that necessitates more choices. CDs end in silence, but the scratch and click of the centre groove on an LP is a nagging call to action: get up, turn me over, or choose something else. There’s a hint of wilful destruction too, knowing that each playing spins the disc a little closer to its
ultimate ruin.

My involvement with the record industry began just as the last LPs were being cleared from the shelves, so I’ve only made CDs. But a year ago I began to make plans for an LP of music I have written for the cellist Anton Lukoszevieze (http://www.antonlukoszevieze.co.uk/) . As we only had enough music for one side of an LP I needed to write a new piece for the other side and I decided the music should, in some way, be about recording itself. The result is called re:play and begins with the cellist making a series of recordings of himself; as he listens back to what he has recorded and then tries to play the same music again, the recordings provide audible evidence that, try as he might, he can’t recapture what he initially played. To make this even clearer, each recording is made with a different technology, and in the version we made for BBC Radio 3 last month we used a Dictaphone, a Studer tape recorder and an Edison wax cylinder phonograph.

The first two were easy to find. The Studer was the work-horse of BBC radio studios until the digital age and the Dictaphone has been a lo-tech favourite of experimental musicians for many years; it’s battery-powered, fits in the palm of a hand, and distorts any sound it records. Edison’s machine, on the other hand, is a real antique and came with its own curator, Aleks Kolkowski, who carefully attached a large conical horn to the hand-cranked recorder and warmed up a wax cylinder with a hairdryer to soften the wax. The hairdryer may not have been authentic but everything else was, and when the recording was played back it sounded as if my music had been transported back in time to the early 1900s.

After the session I talked to Kolkowski, a violinist who works mostly in free improvisation, about the allure of the phonograph. “I saw my colleagues playing with laptops”, he told me, “and I wanted to do something else.” In particular he wanted to make music “influenced by post-1945 electronic music but using pre-electric technology”. He told me too about his most recent project, an installation called The Exponential Horn: In Search of Perfect Sound, which will open at the Science Museum on 20 May and has at its heart an “audio dinosaur”, a 27-foot horn loudspeaker.
Science Museum workshop staff Science Museum workshop staff working on the reconstruction of the giant horn. Photograph: Jennie Hills

The horn opens from an initial 4 sq cm to a 2.15 sq m mouth and is a reconstruction of one of the most popular exhibits in the Science Museum in the 1930s. The original was commissioned in 1929 by Roderick Denman, the Science Museum’s then curator of telecommunications, and was designed to reproduce the widest possible sound frequency range. Once a week this was demonstrated with broadcasts from the BBC’s London Regional Service and in Kolkowski’s installation the audio demonstrations will include sound art, new poetry and archive radio footage, with broadcasts from the BBC and Resonance FM (http://resonancefm.com/) as well as new work.

Audio nostalgia? Perhaps, but, like me, Kolkowski is interested in the way technology affects the processes of recording and listening. He is, he says, “very ambivalent about recording” and, because he wants to make “recordings that sound like recordings”, he chooses to work with technologies that very obviously impose themselves on what is recorded and how it is heard. For him the fascination of the Science Museum’s giant loudspeaker is not only its power and fidelity but also its limitations; there is, he says, an “incredible sound presence in front of the horn, almost three-dimensional” but as soon as one steps away “the sound changes dramatically”.

In 1972, in Ways of Seeing (http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2012/apr/02/how-we-made-ways-seeing) , John Berger described how, “for the first time ever, images of art have become ephemeral, ubiquitous, insubstantial, available, valueless, free”. Some time in the last decade innovations in recording and distribution reduced music to a similar condition, but it may be that installations such as The Exponential Horn and the boom in LP sales will restore some of that lost tangibility and substance, music to value rather than to throw away.

• Christopher Fox’s re:play will be broadcast on Radio 3 in the summer.

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Trumpeter’s ‘amazing’ trove of Long Island jazz memorabilia needs permanent home – Newsday

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** Trumpeter’s ‘amazing’ trove of Long Island jazz memorabilia needs permanent home
————————————————————
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Published: May 30, 2014 10:56 AM
By JAN TYLER Special to Newsday
Jazz trumpeter Tom Manuel of St. James has

Jazz trumpeter Tom Manuel of St. James has collected a vast trove of Long Island jazz memorabilia, including trumpets, trombones, sheet music and other items from the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s. Manuel, 35, seen in his basement of his home on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, wants to place the collection in a public domain so it can be seen and appreciated by the masses. (Credit: Newsday / Chuck Fadely)

Tom Manuel’s basement music room is reminiscent of Aladdin’s cave, if you substitute the diamonds, rubies, pearls and magic lamp for trumpets, trombones, sheet music and other jazz memorabilia from the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s.

All these items and more — autographed pictures, vintage LPs and diaries that once belonged to jazz musicians who played alongside greats like Duke Ellington, Count Basie…

Content Preview This content is exclusive for Newsday digital access and home delivery subscribers and Optimum Online customers.

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The Pianist Jon Weber Offers ‘From Joplin to Jarrett’ – NYTimes.com

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** The Pianist Jon Weber Offers ‘From Joplin to Jarrett’
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And Scott Joplin begat Jelly Roll Morton, who begat James P. Johnson, who begat Fats Waller, who begat Earl Hines, and on and on. That is a rough sketch of the jazz piano genealogy described by the pianist Jon Weber (http://www.jonwebermusic.com/) in his fascinating and essential show “From Joplin to Jarrett: 115 Years of Piano Jazz,” at the Metropolitan Room on Thursday evening.

That history suggested a river gathering tributaries until it reached a delta, symbolized by Keith Jarrett, whose unaccompanied solo marathon concerts in the 1970s summarized much of what preceded him.

From an academic perspective, this one-hour program was an enlightening music history tutorial, delivered with enthusiasm and wit by a musician with no axes to grind and who is utterly devoid of professorial grandiosity. But because Mr. Weber can play up a storm (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TO2Z5Nq9-tM&feature=kp) , it was also a thrilling demonstration of one man’s passionate attachment to his chosen instrument.

Mr. Weber, who has hosted the NPR series “Piano Jazz” (http://www.npr.org/series/145131718/piano-jazz-rising-stars) and is one of the most imaginative and gifted cabaret musical directors, has a deep understanding of how technology and the media have revolutionized the relationship between the musician and the audience. Yet he knows exactly how technical to get without sounding like a textbook.

Like many jazz musicians, Mr. Weber, despite a formidable talent that allows him to play in any style and key, is humble when contemplating the leaps made by his artistic forebears. When he reached Art Tatum and played his “walking chords” over a jet-propelled right hand, he said in awed tones that he had only 1 percent of Tatum’s ability. But that percentage seemed much higher in his phenomenal demonstration.

He showed how the sounds of instrumentalists — particularly on brass, clarinet and guitar — influenced piano styles. In broad outline, it was also the story of how African influences surpassed European styles, and how jazz improvisation, with Louis Armstrong leading the way by playing music that “came directly to his head,” overtook written composition. By embracing jazz, he said, America stopped being what he called “Europe Jr.”

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Jelly Roll Morton, ‘inventor’ of jazz music, is buried in Los Angeles | Off-Ramp | 89.3 KPCC

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** Jelly Roll Morton, ‘inventor’ of jazz music, is buried in Los Angeles
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** Public domain
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Jelly Roll Morton (third from left) and bandmates outside the Cadillac Cafe in 1918.

Of all the places in the United States to look for the headstone of the jazz’s first big innovator, East L.A. is probably the last place on the list. But buried under an unassuming stone in Cavalry Cemetery are the bones of Ferdinand Joseph LaMothe — better known as Jelly Roll Morton — the self-proclaimed, and not entirely wrong, “originator of jazz.”

Can any one person be credited with inventing jazz? Probably not, but Jelly Roll Morton had the audacity and experience to at least be a top contender for the position.

Morton was born in New Orleans in 1890 and honed his chops as a teenager, playing piano for deep-pocketed lowlifes in Storyvilile, New Orleans’ famed red light district and the birthplace of jazz.

There he developed an unmistakable sound, blending the ragtime feel of the previous century with his own complicated rhythms and innovative arrangements. He was a larger-than-life personality with a giant diamond in his teeth and furs on his shoulders.

When Storyville was shut down in 1918, he sought out his childhood crush, a woman named Anita Gonzales, who was running a tavern in Las Vegas. He wasn’t too keen on the weather there and suggested a move further west.

“Anyway, Anita decided to stay in Los Angeles so she went into a small hotel business,” said Morton in a 1938 interview with musicologist Alan Lomax. “She bought a hotel on the corner of Central near 12th in Los Angeles and named it The Anita. By that time, I had several little businesses branching out myself again.”

Most of Morton’s “business” skills had been picked up in Storyville: pool shark and pimp proved to be the most profitable. After an unsatisfactory musical career in Los Angeles, Morton packed his bags and left Anita behind.

He found success in Chicago scoring the more riotous Jazz Age parties with his Red Hot Peppers but when the Great Depression hit, Morton’s career stalled. He sold most of his diamonds and moved to New York.

In 1938, Morton was stabbed twice at a gig — in the head and in the chest. He survived, but the injuries led to chronic respiratory problems.

Two years later, at the age of 50, with failing health and a limited cash flow, he drove himself from New York to Los Angeles to reunite with Anita after almost 20 years.

Once in L.A., he ignored doctor’s orders and tried to mount a comeback, going so far as to book rehearsal time at Central Avenue’s Elks Hall with his old New Orleans friends Kid Ory and “Papa Mutt” Carey, but it never happened. On July 10, 1941, after an 11 day stay in Los Angeles’ General Hospital, he died of heart failure.

Jelly Roll Morton was buried without a headstone. Nine years later, the Southern California Hot Jazz Society held a fundraiser to finally put a marker over the jazzman’s casket. Only then did Anita step up to fund the stone herself, likely with the royalties he’d bequeathed to her on his deathbed.

In just a few short decades, Morton was lost to the evolving trends of jazz and had sabotaged his musical legacy with his own ego.

On the night he died, a savvier young bandleader named Duke Ellington premiered “Jump For Joy,” his impassioned bid for equality and artistic nobility at the Mayan Theater in downtown Los Angeles. The history books were far kinder to him.

Sean J. O’Connell’s book, Los Angeles’s Central Avenue Jazz (http://www.amazon.com/Angeless-Central-Avenue-Images-America/dp/146713130X) is out now onArcadia Publishing (http://www.arcadiapublishing.com/9781467131308/Los-Angeless-Central-Avenue-Jazz) . In it, you’ll find more on Jelly Roll and other Los Angeles Jazz musicians.

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Music: Louis Armstrong’s Renaissance on Record – WSJ.com

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** His Renaissance on Record
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Louis Armstrong (1901-1971) performed in public for most of his life: singing for coins as a child in the roughest streets of pre-World War I New Orleans, playing trumpet and vocalizing in legendary Chicago and New York jazz bands of the 1920s and ’30s, and entertaining huge throngs from the U.S. to Europe to Africa to Asia in the ’50s and ’60s. Performing for audiences (along with making records and movies) made “Satchmo” Armstrong one of the most famous and beloved persons on the planet.

And it was in-person performing that rescued Armstrong’s music from the artistic doldrums into which it had drifted after World War II.

A new nine-disc boxed set documents Louis Armstrong’s resurgence with his ‘All Stars’ band. © Bettmann/CORBIS

In the late 1940s, fronting a big-band out of step with the times and recording best-selling but saccharine-sounding vocal platters, Armstrong was being scorned by jazz critics and despaired over by devotees of the earlier hot music he’d helped invent. The renaissance in his sound and reputation came in 1947, when the charismatic performer pared down his ensemble to a combo of “All Stars” for a series of concert-hall appearances that played to his strengths as a virtuoso trumpeter, an inspiring leader, and a witty and emotional singer.

That period of reinvention is vividly presented on “The Columbia and RCA Victor Live Recordings of Louis Armstrong and the All Stars,” an ear-opening, nine-CD Mosaic boxed set to be released next week. Annotated by Armstrong biographer and archivist Ricky Riccardi, the package documents performances from 1947 to 1958 in venues from New York to Amsterdam to Accra.

The first instance here of the All Stars template Armstrong would follow the rest of his career is a late-night recital at New York’s Town Hall in the spring of 1947. Armstrong commands immediate attention with the up-tempo “Cornet Chop Suey,” a rhythmically intricate number he wrote in 1924—and plays here with a lively urgency that makes it seem as fresh as a Dizzy Gillespie bebop line. The brooding, soaring “Dear Old Southland” (copyright 1921), based on the spiritual “Deep River,” is done by Armstrong in duet with pianist Dick Cary and sounds even more soulful for its secular setting. “Our Monday Date,” “Pennies From Heaven,” “Ain’t Misbehavin'”—the hits from decades past keep coming, infused by Armstrong and colleagues with matchless fire and poignancy.

“This is American music, concert-style,” emcee Fred Robbins states during the next recorded All Stars gig, six months later at Carnegie Hall. Among Armstrong’s steady colleagues now are trombonist-singer Jack Teagarden, clarinetist Barney Bigard and vocalist Velma Middleton. All the stars through the years would be given featured numbers—including bassists and drummers. Teagarden is outstanding in 1947 on “St. James Infirmary”; Bigard makes an engaging showcase out of “Tea for Two.” But even in these spotlight numbers, Armstrong is a vital presence: playing a late-chorus counterpoint to Bigard, for instance, upping the energy toward a big-finish finale.

And when not playing, Armstrong is also a driving force: shouting encouragement to sidemen (some of it quite profane, in previously unreleased tracks) and uttering other heartfelt expressions of joie de vivre. He also directs the spectators from time to time: telling an enthusiastic Milano paisan, “Don’t sing louder than me, brother!” and addressing a terse (but funny) “Shut up, boy” to a boisterous Town Hall patron.

Audience response to Armstrong’s All Stars is at its most tumultuous in New York’s Lewisohn Stadium in the summer of 1956: While Edward R. Murrow’s CBS camera crew works through technical glitches between takes of the combo’s scheduled concert-arrangement performance of “St. Louis Blues” with an 88-piece symphony orchestra led by Leonard Bernstein, a large portion of the 21,000 spectators begin shouting “We want Louis,” prompting Armstrong and his band to wow them with an unplanned “Basin Street Blues.”

Forty-six of the 97 tracks in this Mosaic box are marked “previously unissued.” Some earlier-released cuts, sonically amplified 50 or 60 years ago, have had their dubbed-in applause removed. Certain performances once presented as concert takes are now revealed to have been done in a studio. Other selections made to seem then as if played before a large crowd were in fact swung in front of a smaller audience. Mr. Riccardi’s instructive notes tell us what inventive steps were taken back in the day by producer George Avakian not only to enhance the listener’s experience but to evade obstructive legal roadblocks set up by rival record companies and other factions.

Whether played in an outdoor stadium or an indoor studio, there’s a copious amount on these Mosaic discs of truth, beauty, spontaneous joy and technical prowess—be it the fierce ensemble swing generated on “Royal Garden Blues,” the sweetness of “Faithful Hussar” (a European folk tune in which Armstrong seems to scat sing in German) or the at-home party feel of trombonist Trummy Young on “You Can Depend on Me.” Armstrong’s upper-register notes—a stunning array of high C’s, D’s, E-flats and even an F—are especially heart-piercing on the slow-drag “Back o’ Town Blues,” while his loose and winning way with a lyric is demonstrated through three separate versions (at three different tempos) of “On the Sunny Side of the Street.” And not until Jimi Hendrix deconstructed the national anthem at Woodstock a decade later would there be anything to rival the ripping, impassioned, bravura “Star Spangled Banner” with which Armstrong caps the All Stars’ set at the Newport Jazz Festival of
1958.

As Teagarden drawls in appreciation on his first 1947 concert date with the All Stars: “I’m really in heaven tonight.” Or as Louis shouts at the end of a raucous 1958 Newport number: “Shake ’em on down!”

Mr. Nolan is the author of “Artie Shaw, King of the Clarinet: His Life and Times” (Norton).

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Jazz and Cocktails From the Crypt – WSJ.com

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** Jazz and Cocktails From the Crypt
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An evening of music and drinks in the crypt of the Church of the Intercession.Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

On the steps of the Church of the Intercession on 155th Street and Broadway, Allison Meier, the senior editor for Atlas Obscura, an online compendium of “the world’s wondrous and curious places,” was directing small groups of partygoers wearing vintage formalwear into the church, through the cemetery outside, and down into an underground crypt.

“This is the only currently operating cemetery in Manhattan, but they just do immediate burials, meaning that you can’t buy a plot—you can only get a spot if you need to be buried right then!” explained Ms. Meier, Atlas Obscura’s resident cemetery aficionado, trying in vain to conceal her enthusiasm.

Ella Morton Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

Guests collected inside the crypt on Saturday night, marveling at the majestic architecture and sipping Prohibition-era cocktails as candlelight danced across the walls and a jazz pianist began warming up the crowd. The guests had come for Cocktails in the Crypt, a night of jazz and vintage-inspired libations, put on by the New York Obscura Society, the real-world exploration arm of Atlas Obscura.

“I forwarded the information about this party to my roommate and said, ‘I’m dying to go!’ She asked me if the pun was intended. It wasn’t, but I wished it was,” said Anne Johnson, the social media manager for Vogue.com, looking around the crypt.

Ms. Johnson then smiled knowingly while reflecting on the fact that the cemetery only accommodates on-demand burials: “Wouldn’t you feel bad if your relative asked to be buried in this cemetery and you couldn’t get them in? Like, wouldn’t that be so New York? To not be able to get in?”

Dylan Thuras, who founded Atlas Obscura with Joshua Foer in 2009, explained, “This is kind of the natural completion of the mission we started with—we felt like the world was filled with wonders and hidden spots and hidden stories, both far-flung and close to home, so the events we do complete our mission by helping actually bring people to these places.”

Megan Roberts, Atlas Obscura’s events director, echoed this sentiment: “If you’re not looking for new experiences, even within your own city, you’re missing out. To us, not only was this an incredible space, but, like…Come uptown for the evening! We were trying to break the mold with this—it’s the first event we’ve done in Harlem.”

At around 11 p.m., Loren Schoenberg, the artistic director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, descended the staircase into the crypt. As he gazed around in awe, he seemed at a loss for words because of the beauty of the setting.

“How the heck…? Who would think that under a church…?” he said.

A few minutes later, he introduced Lucky Chops, an eight-year-old jazz band whose members were students together at La Guardia High School. The band’s set included originals and covers of songs including “Eye of the Tiger,” “This Little Light of Mine” and “I Feel Good.”

Because of the acoustics in the crypt, the band filled the room with roaring, honking, swinging explosions. Talking was no use. Luckily, guests didn’t appear to have come for the conversation—most took the opportunity to show off their finest steps.

Leo Pellegrino of the Lucky Chops Brass Band Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

Joseph Desmond, the Accounting Policy Director at Citigroup, and his wife Nicole, a Pilates instructor, dressed to the nines (he in black-and-white wingtips, she with a feather in her hair) and dancing with vigor, appeared to have stepped out of “The Great Gatsby.”

Katherine Rushton with Eric Dysart Stephen Remich for The Wall Street Journal

“When we got married 20 years ago, we took some lessons, and when you’re with someone for that long, you start to know their moves. It’s important not to step on each other,” said Mr. Desmond.

A few feet away, David Bailey and Stephanie Harrison-Bailey, who were married the day before, reflected on Ms. Harrison-Bailey’s dress: “It was the first dress I saw on the rack in a thrift store—I got it right before the party,” she said.

Mr. Bailey looked closely at the dress.

“I suspect the dress is haunted and being near this crypt will trigger some cataclysmic event,” he joked.

By midnight, the air inside the crypt had become humid and taken on the smell of live bodies. Josh Holcomb, the 22-year-old bandleader, wearing wingtips and a vibrant suit, stood outside in the cemetery, taking in some fresh air during the band’s break.

“This is definitely the spookiest place we’ve ever performed—we’ve never played in a cemetery, much less an indoor cemetery,” he said, glancing around at the tombstones.

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A New Focus on Eric Dolphy, in Washington and Montclair – NYTimes.com

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** A New Focus on Eric Dolphy, in Washington and Montclair
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Continue reading the main story Slide Show

** A Virtuoso Revisited
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Credit Francis Wolff/Mosaic Images, via CORBIS.

In the jazz of the 1960s, Eric Dolphy was an original: a hero to some, but also a mystery, a virtuosic improviser searching for ways of expression outside of common practice. He died of an undiagnosed diabetic condition in Berlin in June 1964, at 36, old enough to consolidate his experience and wisdom but perhaps too young to settle his reputation, which had by then taken some knocks from those who found his music abstract or abrasive.

Though he had recorded a fair amount, especially in his last four years, culminating in the 1964 album “Out to Lunch!” and a Dutch performance recorded 27 days before his death and released as “Last Date,” there is still more to be known about what produced and drove him. Right now, a half-century after his death, might be a significant turning point. His musical papers have just been acquired by the Music Division of the Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/rr/perform/div-intro.html) , and his music, including pieces never performed before, will be played at a two-day festival in his honor, called Eric Dolphy: Freedom of Sound (http://seedartists.org/) , this weekend in Montclair, N.J.

The papers were long in the possession of Dolphy’s close friends the composer Hale Smith, who died in 2009 (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/28/arts/music/28smith.html) , and his wife, Juanita, who later gave them to the flutist and composer James Newton (http://www.jamesnewtonmusic.com/) . The cache, five boxes of material, is available to scholars in the Library of Congress Performing Arts Reading Room. It includes several previously unperformed works, as well as extensions or alternative arrangements of Dolphy pieces, including “Hat and Beard,” “Gazzelloni” and “The Prophet.”

It also holds a key to how he thought and what he practiced: his transcriptions of other music, including bits of Charlie Parker and Stravinsky; Bach’s Partita in A minor for flute; and a bass-clarinet arrangement for Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1. There are also many scales of Dolphy’s own devising, which he was using as the basis for improvisation; practice books and lead sheets; and a page of transcriptions of bird calls.

“The thing that really astounded me,” Mr. Newton said recently, “was that this was a person who thought very profoundly about the organization of his music.” Dolphy wrote out hundreds of his altered or “synthetic” scales. In some cases, including on the individual parts for “Out to Lunch!,” he wrote out the unusual scales beneath the composition, as a possible basis for improvisation.

“Eric was developing multiple styles of music simultaneously,” Mr. Newton continued. “There was this highly chromatic post-bop; then music that combined elements of jazz and contemporary classical; and jazz combined with world music.” (Dolphy, along with his friend John Coltrane, was listening to Hindustani music and the songs of the so-called Pygmy peoples of Central Africa.)

The festival, organized by the drummer Pheeroan akLaff and produced by his nonprofit organization, Seed Artists, will be held this Friday and Saturday at Montclair State University. It will include some of those previously unperformed works, which Mr. Newton is reasonably sure come from the end of Dolphy’s life. It will also include other Dolphy-related music performed by several generations of musicians, including Andrew Cyrille, Henry Threadgill, Don Byron, Vernon Reid, Oliver Lake, Marty Ehrlich, David Virelles, James Brandon Lewis and Dolphy’s former bandmate the 84-year old bassist Richard Davis.
Continue reading the main story

Dolphy, born in 1928, played alto saxophone, bass clarinet and flute. He grew up in Los Angeles and didn’t move to New York until the age of 30 — not the standard narrative of most great figures in jazz during that time. He was an only child, and a prodigy: While still in junior high, he won a two-year scholarship to study at the music school of the University of Southern California, and his parents built him a music studio behind the house.

Dolphy came into a compositional style that used wide interval jumps in various ways, sensuous or fractured. He also organized an original improvising language, both in and out of traditional Western harmony and jazz convention. He was influenced by, among others, Parker, Art Tatum and Arnold Schoenberg, as well as the microtones and quick-pivoting phrasing of bird song.

“In my own playing,” he told the critic Martin Williams in 1960, “I am trying to incorporate what I hear. I hear other resolutions on the basic harmonic patterns, and I try to use them. And I try to get the instrument to more or less speak — everybody does.”

Toward the end of his life, Dolphy wasn’t getting enough work playing his own music. He’d been derided in the jazz press, especially after touring with Coltrane in 1961 and 1962. “He was getting criticized even by friends,” Ms. Smith said.

He left New York for Europe in early 1964, to tour with Charles Mingus. (He eventually quit that tour, determined to work on his own in Europe and to settle down with his fiancée, the dancer Joyce Mordecai, who was living in Paris.) Before leaving, he dropped off his papers and other things, including tapes and a reel-to-reel recorder, with the Smiths. The tapes yielded “Other Aspects,” an album released in 1987. But the sheet music, finally given to Mr. Newton in 2004, took a while longer to be sorted out.

Among the never previously performed pieces scheduled for the weekend are an untitled solo bass-clarinet work, to be played by Mr. Byron; a short piece for flute and bass, “To Tonio, Dead”; and “Song F.T.R.H.” and “On the Rocks,” for jazz ensembles.

Those last two were written without tempo markings, but Mr. Newton and Mr. akLaff agree that they are to be played slowly. Mr. akLaff said the pieces could be described as ceremonial music, having a “deep, dark grandeur.” (Dolphy seemed to like word puzzles; we don’t know what F.T.R.H. stands for, nor the meaning of words written in pencil on one version of the score: “Split clock birds drink wood’s angel through longhouse.”)

If Dolphy didn’t have enough cultural capital at his death to inspire a school of imitators, he became a model for how to be dedicated and curious. Mr. Lewis, 30, a saxophonist who will perform in an ensemble on Saturday, said that Dolphy suggests “a figure determined to say what he had to say at the highest level in which he had to say it.” (Like everyone who talks about Dolphy, at a certain point Mr. Lewis just had to indicate an example and listen, agog: He specified Dolphy’s bass-clarinet solo on Billy Strayhorn’s “Take the A Train,” live with Mingus in 1964, which can be easily found on YouTube. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuCbQCnoIzI) )

“He’s just amazing,” Mr. Lewis added. “He sounds completely different than anyone else on stage, but he sounds confident.”

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